2856
Louisiana

Signature City New Orleans

Get to know the real New Orleans through full days of excursions to historic landmarks, artists’ haunts and jazz venues. Plus, sample cuisine at the New Orleans School of Cooking!
Rating (4.92)
Program No. 2856RJ
Length
6 days
Starts at
1,599

At a Glance

With over 300 years of colorful culture under its belt, New Orleans revels in its giddy blend of European refinement and carefree effervescence, a place where virtue and vice are celebrated in equal measure. On this introduction to New Orleans, we’ve planned a full schedule of activities, so you can experience the intoxicating charms of “the Crescent City” that have long fascinated artists, writers, musicians and scholars. Experience live New Orleans jazz, and take field trips inside and outside the French Quarter and Garden District. Get perspectives on architectural and literary landmarks, and enjoy unique culinary adventures as well as the National World War II Museum.
Activity Level
On Your Feet
Moderate walking and standing.

Best of all, you'll ...

  • On a bus excursion, see Lake Pontchartrain, Bayou St. John, the city’s famed above-ground cemeteries and St. Charles Avenue, including a walk in the Garden District to take in its historic architecture.
  • Delve into the local literary history as you study Tennessee Williams, John Kennedy Toole, William Faulkner and more impressive writers with an expert.
  • Enjoy a cooking demonstration as you dine at the New Orleans School of Cooking.

General Notes

You may enjoy a slower-paced program, "New Orleans at a Slower Pace: A City of History, Culture and Celebration" (#1475), or a more active, Small Group program with more free time "Jazz, Jambalaya and Joie de Vivre in New Orleans" (#21665).
Featured Expert
All Experts
Profile Image
Doreen Ketchens
Doreen Ketchens is a musician whose primary interest lies in spreading the culture and traditional music of New Orleans all over the world, through performances and education. As the leader of the jazz band Doreen’s Jazz New Orleans, she has been called "Queen Clarinet", "The female Louis Armstrong", and “Lady Louie” by critics who have heard her perform. Her husband, Lawrence, plays the tuba, valve trombone and piano with the group. Doreen's Jazz New Orleans has represented New Orleans around the world, performing in Africa, Asia, Canada, Europe, South America, Russia and the U.S. They have played for four U.S. presidents, including Bill Clinton, George Bush Sr., Ronald Reagan and Jimmy Carter. It is almost impossible to sit through a performance of Doreen's Jazz New Orleans without moving in your seat, shouting, clapping, or tapping your feet — we think you’ll agree!

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

Profile Image
Nellie Watson
View biography
<%= Bio %>
Profile Image
Doreen Ketchens
View biography
<%= Bio %>
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Creole New Orleans Race and Americanization
by Arthur Hirsch and John Logsdon
This collection of six original essays explores the peculiar ethnic composition and history of New Orleans, which the authors persuasively argue is unique among American cities. The focus of Creole New Orleans is on the development of a colonial Franco-African culture in the city, the ways that culture was influenced by the arrival of later immigrants, and the processes that led to the eventual dominance of the Anglo-American community.
Rising Tide
by John Barry
An American epic of science, politics, race, honor, high society, and the Mississippi River, Rising Tide tells the riveting and nearly forgotten story of the greatest natural disaster this country has ever known -- the Mississippi flood of 1927. The river inundated the homes of nearly one million people, helped elect Huey Long governor and made Herbert Hoover president, drove hundreds of thousands of blacks north, and transformed American society and politics forever.
Life On The Mississippi
by Mark Twain
An invaluable companion to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Life on the Mississippi is Mark Twain's inimitable portrait of 'the great Father of Waters'. Part memoir, part travelogue, it expresses the full range of Twain's literary personality, and remains the most vivid, boisterous and provocative account of the cultural and societal history of the Mississippi Valley, from 'the golden age' of steamboating to the violence wrought by the Civil War.
A Streetcar Named Desire
by Tennessee Williams
Widely considered a landmark play, A Streetcar Named Desire deals with a culture clash between two characters, Blanche DuBois, a relic of the Old South, and Stanley Kowalski, a rising member of the industrial, urban working class. American playwright Tennessee Williams received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1948.
Why New Orleans Matters
by Tom Piazza
In the aftermath of Katrina and the disaster that followed, promises were made, forgotten, and renewed. Now what will become of New Orleans in the years ahead? What do this proud, battered city and its people mean to America and the world? Award-winning author and longtime New Orleans resident Tom Piazza illuminates the storied culture and uncertain future of this great and neglected American metropolis by evoking the sensuous rapture of the city that gave us jazz music and Creole cooking; examining its deep undercurrents of corruption, racism, and injustice; and explaining how its people endure and transcend those conditions. And, perhaps most important, he asks us all to consider the spirit of this place and all the things it has shared with the world: its grace and beauty, resilience and soul.
Confederacy of Dunces
by John Kennedy Toole
A Confederacy of Dunces is a picaresque novel written by American novelist John Kennedy Toole, published by Louisiana State University Press in 1980, eleven years after the author's suicide. The book, published through the efforts of writer Walker Percy (who also contributed a revealing foreword) and Toole's mother Thelma Toole, quickly became a cult classic, and later a mainstream success. Toole posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1981. It is now considered a canonical work of modern Southern literature, in the USA. The title derives from the epigraph by Jonathan Swift: "When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him." The story is set in New Orleans in the early 1960s. The central character is Ignatius J. Reilly, an educated but slothful 30-year-old man still living with his mother in the city's Uptown neighborhood, who, due to an incident early in the book, must set out to get a job. In his quest for employment he has various adventures with colorful French Quarter characters.
All the Kings Men
by Robert Penn Warren
All the King's Men traces the rise and fall of demagogue Willie Stark, a fictional character loosely based on Governor Huey ""Kingfish"" Long of Louisiana. Stark begins his political career as an idealistic man of the people but soon becomes corrupted by success and caught between dreams of service and an insatiable lust for power.





Click here to provide website feedback
Website Feedback