22824
Minnesota
Spring in the Mississippi River Valley: Birds and Wildflowers
The Mississippi River Valley in Minnesota is the largest of North America’s major flyways. Join naturalists to witness warbler migrations, blooming wildflowers and bald eagles!
Program No. 22824RJ
Length
7 days
Starts at
1,675
Getting There
See travel details and required documents

At a Glance

Spring in Minnesota’s Mississippi River Valley spells a time of dramatic changes. Flocks of warblers serenade from the treetops as they migrate north. Blooming wildflowers brighten the riverbanks with vibrant yellows and reds. And while waterfowl take to the river, bald eagles soar majestically overhead. Explore a portion of the upper Mississippi River and discover gorgeous city and state parks and fascinating National Parks and Wildlife Refuges. Learn about the habitats of the Upper Mississippi River with seasoned naturalists as you explore the best of the Mississippi in spring.
Activity Level
Active
Walking on paved, gravel, or crushed limestone trails and paved trails up to 2 miles a day in state and city parks. One boat trip on the Mississippi.
Small Group
Love to learn and explore in a small-group setting? These adventures offer small, personal experiences with groups of 10 to 24 participants.

Best of all, you'll ...

  • Explore Frontenac State Park, known as a famous warbler migration site and a premier birding destination.
  • Learn firsthand about bald eagles at the world-class National Eagle Center and search for waterfowl at Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge.
  • Discover the spectacular Minnehaha Falls, inspiration for Longfellow’s epic poem “Hiawatha,” and St. Anthony Falls, the only waterfalls on the mighty Mississippi
Featured Expert
All Experts
Mike Link
Mike Link has dedicated his career to environmental education, and served as the founding director of the Audubon Center of the North Woods for 38 years. During that time, he not only developed a successful residential environmental learning center, but aided in the success of many other environmental education endeavors — including starting over 15 Charter Schools that emphasized environmental education. He was an integral part of the teams that created degree programs in outdoor and environmental education at both Northland College and Hamline University. He continues to teach numerous courses for Hamline’s Master’s Degree in natural science. Mike has also been involved in many organizations, and helped to create the Minnesota Naturalist Association (MNA) in the early 1970’s. He is the author of over 1,000 newspaper and magazine articles, in addition to publishing more than a dozen books.
Kate Crowley
Mike Link