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Pennsylvania

A Week With the Scientists at Penn State University

Program No. 14314RJ
Discover the science behind weather forecasting, searching for planets and how to detect black holes — captivating discussions and exciting excursions with Penn State experts.
Length
6 days
Rating (4.67)
Activity Level
Starts at
1,399

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climate
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itinerary
Please Note:
The itinerary for this program is different on certain dates.
Select your type of room
Price will update based on selection
Prices displayed below are based on per person,doubleoccupancy.
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Jun 4 - Jun 9, 2023
Starting at
1,399
Itinerary Note

Meteorology: Weather Patterns, Predictions and Climate Change.

Jun 11 - Jun 16, 2023
Starting at
1,399
Itinerary Note

Astronomy: Planets, Stars, Galaxies and the Universe.

May 19 - May 24, 2024
Starting at
1,449
Itinerary Note

Physics: Illusions, Radiation & Gravitational Waves, Electric Circuits.

Jun 2 - Jun 7, 2024
Starting at
1,449
Itinerary Note

Meteorology: Weather Patterns, Predictions and Climate Change.

Jun 9 - Jun 14, 2024
Starting at
1,449
Itinerary Note

Astronomy: Planets, Stars, Galaxies and the Universe.

DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Jun 4 - Jun 9, 2023
Starting at
1,729
Itinerary Note

Meteorology: Weather Patterns, Predictions and Climate Change.

Jun 11 - Jun 16, 2023
Starting at
1,729
Itinerary Note

Astronomy: Planets, Stars, Galaxies and the Universe.

May 19 - May 24, 2024
Starting at
1,749
Itinerary Note

Physics: Illusions, Radiation & Gravitational Waves, Electric Circuits.

Jun 2 - Jun 7, 2024
Starting at
1,749
Itinerary Note

Meteorology: Weather Patterns, Predictions and Climate Change.

Jun 9 - Jun 14, 2024
Starting at
1,749
Itinerary Note

Astronomy: Planets, Stars, Galaxies and the Universe.

6 days
5 nights
13 meals
5B 4L 4D
View Full Itinerary

At a Glance

The sky is not the limit on this learning adventure! Choose your week to study astronomy, meteorology, or Physics alongside some of the nation’s leading scientists at Penn State University. Behind-the-scenes excursions and expert-led discussions allow for the exploration of weather patterns or asteroid impacts, while using the most cutting-edge technology the university has to offer. Discover how the universe was created and learn about detecting black holes and neutron star and visit a Nuclear Reactor with Penn State experts.
Activity Level
Easy Going
A trolley is available to transport participants from the hotel to the campus.

Best of all, you’ll…

  • Choose the Meteorology date and learn how to read radar, observational networks and understand numerical weather prediction with demonstrations from expert meteorologists.
  • Choose the Astronomy date and learn from knowledgeable astronomers about Mars in 3-D and dark energy while searching for planets and life around other stars.
  • Choose the Physics date and learn about detecting black holes and neutron star, and visit a Nuclear Reactor.
Featured Expert
All Experts
Profile Image
Chris Palma
Chris Palma is the associate dean for undergraduate students in the Eberly College of Science at Penn State University. He earned a B.S. in astronomy and astrophysics from Penn State and a Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Virginia. For his research, he studies dwarf galaxies near the Milky Way as well as educational practices for introductory astronomy. He is actively involved in the training of K-12 science teachers.

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

Profile Image of Michael Smitka
Michael T. Smitka View biography
Michael is an assistant teaching professor of physics at Penn State University. He earned his BS in physics from Shippensburg University, MS in physics from Bowling Green State University and Ph.D. in physics from Texas A&M University. He has researched Type Ia supernovae explosions and variable stars, and developed data analysis procedures for the Swift space telescope. He teaches introductory level physics courses and creates physics- and astronomy-themed artwork.
Profile Image of Stephen Van Hook
Stephen J. Van Hook View biography
Stephen is an associate teaching professor of physics at Penn State University. He earned his MA in physics from the University of California at Berkeley and his PhD in physics from the University of Texas at Austin. He has done research on gravitational wave detection, pulsar timing, pattern formation in fluids, chaos, K-12 science teacher preparation and effective teaching strategies for physics. He has directed and taught summer science camps on physics and the arts, physics and toys and physics and CAD/3D printing.
Profile Image of Kirstin Purdy Drew
Kirstin Purdy Drew View biography
Kirstin Purdy Drew is an associate teaching professor of physics at Penn State University. She earned her MA and PhD in physics from Brandeis University. Her scientific research interests lie at the interface between biology and physics. Her current interests are developing and applying strategies for teaching the future generation of physical scientists necessary laboratory and research skills. She has directed, designed and taught workshops for summer research programs for both undergraduate students and K-12 science teachers.
Profile Image of Jon Nese
Jon M. Nese View biography
Jon is associate head of undergraduate programs and a teaching professor in the Department of Meteorology and Atmospheric Science at Penn State, where he teaches a variety of undergraduate courses. He was previously chief meteorologist at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia and on-air storm analyst at The Weather Channel. He has co-authored two books: "The Philadelphia Area Weather Book," which received the 2005 Louis J. Battan Author’s Award from the American Meteorological Society, and a college-level introductory textbook, "A World of Weather: Fundamentals of Meteorology."
Profile Image of Chris Palma
Chris Palma View biography
Chris Palma is the associate dean for undergraduate students in the Eberly College of Science at Penn State University. He earned a B.S. in astronomy and astrophysics from Penn State and a Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Virginia. For his research, he studies dwarf galaxies near the Milky Way as well as educational practices for introductory astronomy. He is actively involved in the training of K-12 science teachers.
Profile Image of Kevin Luhman
Kevin Luhman View biography
Kevin Luhman is a professor at Penn State University. He earned B.S. degrees in astronomy and physics from the University of Texas and a Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Arizona. For his research, he studies brown dwarfs and the birth of stars and planets.
Profile Image of Jane Charlton
Jane Charlton View biography
Jane Charlton graduated from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1983 with a B.S. in chemistry and physics. She received her Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from the University of Chicago in 1987. After postdoctoral positions at Cornell University and the University of Arizona, she came to Penn State in 1992. She is now a professor of astronomy and astrophysics, working on a variety of topics including galaxy evolution, interacting galaxies, and quasars. Charlton developed a science fiction story-based online course in Astronomy for Penn State undergraduates.
Profile Image of Jon Nese
Jon Nese is the associate head of undergraduate programs, and a teaching professor in the Department of Meteorology and Atmospheric Science at Penn State, where he teaches a variety of undergraduate courses. He also hosts and writes for Penn State’s weather magazine show, 'Weather World', for which he won an Emmy in 2015. Prior to joining the Penn State faculty, he was chief meteorologist at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia and on-air storm analyst at The Weather Channel. Dr. Nese has co-authored two books.
Profile Image of Bill Syrett
Bill Syrett View biography
Bill Syrett was born in Bristol, Connecticut and has been fascinated by "bad" weather since he was five years old. He received his B.S. and M.S. in meteorology and was then hired by Penn State as a research assistant. In 1995, he began his tenure as the manager of Penn State's University Park weather observatory, now the Joel N. Myers Weather Center. In that position, he oversees the daily recording of official cooperative weather observations for State College, Pennsylvania.
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Our Universe: An Astronomer’s Guide
by Jo Dunkley
Dunkley takes her readers on a grand tour of space and time, from our nearest planetary neighbors to the edge of the observable Universe. The book follows a well-trodden path, starting with an overview of the history of astronomy and a description of our Solar System. Stellar evolution is next, followed by galaxies, clusters and the mystery of dark matter. The birth, evolution and future of the Universe are discussed in the final chapters. Explanations are always clear, metaphors are to the point and arguments easy to follow. If you feel like refreshing your background knowledge, or are looking for a present for your curious niece or nephew, this little gem certainly won’t disappoint.
A Brief History of Time
by Stephen Hawking
A landmark volume in science writing by one of the great minds of our time, Stephen Hawking’s book explores such profound questions as: How did the universe begin—and what made its start possible? Does time always flow forward? Is the universe unending—or are there boundaries? Are there other dimensions in space? What will happen when it all ends? Told in language we all can understand, A Brief History of Time plunges into the exotic realms of black holes and quarks, of antimatter and “arrows of time,” of the big bang and a bigger God—where the possibilities are wondrous and unexpected. With exciting images and profound imagination, Stephen Hawking brings us closer to the ultimate secrets at the very heart of creation.
Constellations: The Story of Space Told Through the 88 Known Star Patterns in the Night Sky
by Govert Schilling
This lavishly adorned guide to all 88 constellations in the night sky, complete with an illustrated star map for each one by esteemed stellar cartographer Wil Tirion, provides the exact location of every constellation, the details of its structure, and data on its surrounding astronomical neighbors. Award-winning astronomy writer Govert Schilling takes us on this splendid visual tour, offering a complete history of astronomy via the lens of the constellations themselves. Organized alphabetically by constellation, his stargazing companion profiles each shining formation and includes basic info including size, visibility, and number of stars, as well as information on the discovery and official naming of the constellations and associated legends surrounding them.
The Martian: A Novel
by Andy Weir
Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars. Now, he’s sure he’ll be the first person to die there. After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth that he’s alive—and even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone long before a rescue could arrive. Chances are, though, he won’t have time to starve to death. The damaged machinery, unforgiving environment, or plain-old “human error” are much more likely to kill him first.
The Backyard Astronomer’s Guide – 4th Edition
by Terence Dickenson and Alan Dyer
This classic, groundbreaking guide has been the go-to field guide for both beginning and experienced amateur astronomers for nearly 30 years. The fourth edition brings Terence Dickinson and Alan Dyer's invaluable manual completely up-to-date. Setting a new standard for astronomy guides, it will serve as the touchstone for the next generation of stargazers as well as longtime devotees.
The Stargazer's Sister
by Carrie Brown
Based on the life of Caroline Herschel, sister of famed astronomer William Herschel, who discovered several comets but struggles to be seen as anything more than her brother's sister.
Space: 10 Things You Should Know
by By Dr. Becky Smethurst
This book is for anyone who wants to easily understand the mind-blowing fundamentals of our extraordinary, expanding universe. Written by Oxford astrophysicist Dr Becky Smethurst and composed of ten captivating, simple essays, it guides you swiftly through the galaxies, explaining the mysteries of black holes, dark matter and what existed before the Big Bang, presenting the evidence as to whether we really are alone, illuminating what we still don't know, and much more besides. If you have big questions about Space, this book will provide you with the answers in an engaging and succinct way.





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If you want to attend the live lecture, please do not wait until the last minute to enroll.
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