loading spinner
22586
Ireland

Ireland at a Slower Pace: Countryside & Culture, Galway to Dublin

Experience Ireland’s cities, villages, farms and nature, and interact with her people as you journey at a leisurely pace from the rural West through County Kerry and on to Dublin.
Rating (5)
Program No. 22586RJ
Length
11 days
Starts at
3,299
Flights start at
625
Ireland

Ireland at a Slower Pace: Countryside & Culture, Galway to Dublin

Experience Ireland’s cities, villages, farms and nature, and interact with her people as you journey at a leisurely pace from the rural West through County Kerry and on to Dublin.
Length
11 days
Starts at
3,299
Flights start at
625
Program No. 22586 RJ
Prefer to enroll or inquire by phone? 800-454-5768
airfare
Need airfare?
Our airfare tool can help. Check it out
climate
Plan ahead.
What kind of weather can you expect? Take a look!
Select your type of room
Price will update based on selection
Prices displayed below are based on per person,doubleoccupancy.
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Apr 22 - May 2, 2021
Starting at
3,299
May 20 - May 30, 2021
Starting at
3,299
Jun 3 - Jun 13, 2021
Starting at
3,299
Aug 12 - Aug 22, 2021
Starting at
3,299
Sep 16 - Sep 26, 2021
Starting at
3,399
Oct 7 - Oct 17, 2021
Starting at
3,399
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Apr 22 - May 2, 2021
Starting at
3,949
May 20 - May 30, 2021
Starting at
3,949
Jun 3 - Jun 13, 2021
Starting at
3,949
Aug 12 - Aug 22, 2021
Starting at
3,949
Sep 16 - Sep 26, 2021
Starting at
4,049
Oct 7 - Oct 17, 2021
Starting at
4,049

At a Glance

Experience Ireland’s cities, villages, farms and natural environments and interact with her people as you journey from the rural West through County Kerry and on to Dublin. Friendly locals accompany your discovery, moving at a relaxed pace that allows for thorough exploration of the Cliffs of Moher, Galway, Bunratty Castle and more, as well as for conversation in cozy pubs where lively traditional music is played.
Activity Level
On Your Feet
Walk a few blocks indoors and out, stand for up to an hour at a time, climb a few stairs.
Small Group
Small Group
Love to learn and explore in a small-group setting? These adventures offer small, personal experiences with groups of 10 to 24 participants.

Best of all, you'll ...

  • Learn about the natural forces behind the legendary beauty of Ireland’s wild spaces on expert-led discoveries of the Cliffs of Moher, the Burren and County Kerry.
  • Discover traditional Irish food on a local food trail.
  • Join locals to take part in customary Irish pastimes, including the country’s vibrant music and dance traditions.

General Notes

You may be interested in a more active version of this program, "Enchanting Ireland: Town and Country" (#21258).
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
See Dublin on foot, an architectural walking guide
by Julie Craig
For the Love of Ireland: A Literary Companion
by Susan Cahill (ed.)
A rich anthology of writing about Ireland by such Irish luminaries as James Joyce, William Butler Yeats, Seamus Heaney, William, Trevor, Frank McCourt, Edna O'Brien, and Samuel Beckett. The well-chosen excerpts, organized by province, evoke in wonderful literary detail the geography of Ireland. Highly recommended for any traveler, the anthology is also a fine introduction to Irish literature.
After the Famine: Irish Agriculture 1850-1914
by Michael Turner
After the Famine examines the recovery in Irish agriculture in the wake of the disastrous potato famine of the 1840s, and presents an annual agricultural output series for Ireland from 1850 to 1914. Michael Turner’s detailed study is in three parts: he analyses the changing structure of agriculture in terms of land use and peasant occupancy; he presents estimates of the annual value of Irish output between 1850 and 1914; and he assesses Irish agricultural performance in terms of several measures of productivity. These analyses are placed in the context of British and European agricultural development, and suggest that, contrary to prevailing orthodoxies, landlords rather than tenants were the main beneficiaries in the period leading up to the land reforms. After the Famine is an important contribution to an extremely controversial area of Irish social and economic history.
EXploring Rural Ireland
by A.Sanger
Ireland and the Irish
by John Ardagh
impressionistic portrait of the two Irelands, based on interviews with leaders and ordinary people from every walk of life, includes their insights and the author's own observations and analysis. Anatomy of the country, this book is a most useful guide for the visitor wanting a complete picture of modern Irish life and the prevailing social and economic trends.
The Secrets of Ireland
by Kevin Eyres
A breathtaking land of wildly varied landscapes, Ireland is shown here in all its awe-inspiring glory. From familiar tourist spots to seldom-seen vistas, this stunning new illustrated book captures the country as you've never seen it before. It covers the whole of the Emerald Isle from Ulster North to Munster South, from Giant's Causeway to the Cliffs of Moher.
Luck and the Irish: A Brief History of Change, 1970-2000
by Roy Foster
From 1970, things were changing in Ireland; the Celtic Tiger had finally woken, and the rules for everything from gender roles and religion to international relations were being entirely rewritten. Luck and the Irish examines how the country has weathered these last thirty years of change, and what these changes may mean in the long run. R. F. Foster also looks at how characters as diverse as Gerry Adams, Mary Robinson, Charles Haughey and Bob Geldof have contributed to Ireland's altered psyche, and uncovers some of the scandals, corruption and marketing masterminds that have transformed Ireland and its luck.
Ireland (Landscapes Countryside Guides)
by Peter Singer
This guide covers the Republic and Northern Ireland and includes: 13 car tours, 22 walks, 30 picnic suggestions; walking maps; timetables for public transport; pull-out touring maps; many short walks and picnic suggestions.
Ireland in the 20th Century
by Tim Pat Coogan
Ireland entered the twentieth century savaged by poverty and memories of the famine but inspired by the Celtic Dawn, a remarkable cultural renaissance led by Yeats, Synge and Lady Gregory. She left it in the era of the Celtic Tiger, with unparalleled prosperity and a new, confident, outward-looking view of herself and the world - although this prosperity and self-confidence is now giving way to uncertainty. In the intervening hundred years, Ireland has experienced more 'history' than almost any other country: beginning under the British crown, she was racked by revolution, the Anglo-Irish war, partition and civil conflict. Led by towering figures such as Michael Collins and De Valera, she has suffered terrible hardships and disputes but has nevertheless provided brilliant cultural and literary examples and is now a country of importance in the wider international community, providing leadership in a variety of moral and development issues. In this readable and authoritative study, Ireland's bestselling popular historian tells the extraordinary story of how contemporary Ireland came into existence. Covering both South and North and dealing with social and cultural history as well as political, this will surely become a definitive single-volume account of the making of modern Ireland.
Ireland : The Emerald Isle and Its People
by Mark Morris and Anthony Cassidy
Ireland, a Bicycle and a Tin Whistle
by D.Wilson
A Concise History of Ireland
by Marie O'Brien and Conor Cruise
7 Days in Dublin: Everything to See and Do
by Shane Kennedy
A Traveller's History of Ireland
by Peter Neville
From the Celts to the Norman invasions and modern-day Ireland, this short history is highly recommended for those who would like a brief overview of the Emerald Isle through the centuries
Walking Dublin
by Pat Liddy
13 Reviews
Sort by
Most Recent
  • Most Recent
  • Most Favorable
  • Least Favorable
5 Average
This reviewer did not give a star rating.

Excellent! A great guide who took fine care in every way. Itinerary was long on bus rides some days.

(5)

A terrific program with a wonderful Program Guide (Sinead). If you want to experience the land and diversity of Ireland then go on this Road Scholar trip.

(5)

This program combines a substantial view of rural country side, small towns and villages and the big city of Dublin. We experienced 10 of the 26 counties of the Republic of Ireland. The trip left a yearning to return once or twice to experience the remainder.

(5)

My husband and I are delighted that we decided to try a Road Scholar trip. Not only was the tour engaging, but all of the advance info and prep was extremely helpful.

(5)

I Will Be Doing Another RS Tour Next Summer!!! Way To Go Y'All!!!

(5)

This trip was a wonderful way to introduce an individual to beautiful Ireland. The group leader, local experts, food, accommodations, transportation, and site visits were exceptional. I had high expectations about the trip and those expectations were truly exceeded. Thank you for all the fantastic memories.

This reviewer did not give a star rating.

I had little to no trouble navigating the Road Scholar web site. Even my wife who hates computers and web sites could navigate it without too much grief.

(5)

"Ireland at a Slower Pace" was truly remarkable. I learned so much about Ireland and its history. Kinsale and the food tour, Cliffs of Mohre and the exhibition therin, Coole and Bunratty and The gardens at Blarney added so much to the experience. the Queentown Story exhibition is not to be missed. The comraderie just happened spontaneously, a welcome feature.. . Made a couple of friends (Moi !) And our leader was excellent, going above and beyond to help the participants. - Just Go !

(5)

Ireland's history offers so much more variety than I expected, particularly the Atlantic connections. Fascinating.

(5)

A visit to Ireland is a "must" and is delightful. The land is beautiful and filled with history and interesting sights of today's life there and the life of the past. Irish people are welcoming, helpful, and approachable. They clearly love their country and want visitors to love it as well.

(5)

The variety of educational experiences and sights visited was excellent! Ireland should be on everyone's "must see" list.

(5)

This tour was an excellent way to visit parts of a country I've never traveled before. I learned a great deal of Irish history of relevance to our experience of the Irish Diaspora in the USA. Because this tour catered to people of limited mobility, it was thoughtfully paced and still permitted some opportunities for participants to be more physically active if desired. It is not a tour for people who dislike prolonged sedentary activity. It was led by a young woman with an archeology background and who provided excellent, illuminating commentary. There was otherwise a paucity of formal academic presentations. The accommodations were excellent.

(5)

Ireland at a Slower Pace more than met my expectations. I learned so much about Ireland and its history and this makes me want to explore it more as well as other places around the world. The comraderie just added to the experience.






Your Well-Being is Our #1 Priority

We’re committed to making your experience as safe and enjoyable as possible.

See Our Safety Roadmap
Click here to provide website feedback
Website Feedback