loading spinner
11077
Massachusetts

New England Maritime Sampler

Voyage along Cape Ann’s beautifully rugged coast, exploring unique wildlife, classic New England charm, traditional cuisine and the region’s famed history of shipbuilding.
Rating (5)
Program No. 11077RJ
Length
6 days
Starts at
1,349
Special Offer
Click on Dates & Prices below to see special offer details.
Massachusetts

New England Maritime Sampler

Voyage along Cape Ann’s beautifully rugged coast, exploring unique wildlife, classic New England charm, traditional cuisine and the region’s famed history of shipbuilding.
Length
6 days
Starts at
1,349
Special Offer
Click on Dates & Prices below to see special offer details.
Program No. 11077 RJ
Prefer to enroll or inquire by phone? 800-454-5768
climate
Plan ahead.
What kind of weather can you expect? Take a look!
Select your type of room
Price will update based on selection
Prices displayed below are based on per person,doubleoccupancy.
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Jun 20 - Jun 25, 2021
Starting at
1,349
Special Offer

No extra cost for single rooms! Free singles sell out quickly, so be sure to enroll early.

Jul 11 - Jul 16, 2021
Starting at
1,449
Aug 8 - Aug 13, 2021
Starting at
1,449
Sep 12 - Sep 17, 2021
Starting at
1,349
Special Offer

No extra cost for single rooms! Free singles sell out quickly, so be sure to enroll early.

DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Jun 20 - Jun 25, 2021
Starting at
1,349
Special Offer

No extra cost for single rooms! Free singles sell out quickly, so be sure to enroll early.

Jul 11 - Jul 16, 2021
Starting at
1,849
Aug 8 - Aug 13, 2021
Starting at
1,849
Sep 12 - Sep 17, 2021
Starting at
1,349
Special Offer

No extra cost for single rooms! Free singles sell out quickly, so be sure to enroll early.

At a Glance

On an adventure by land and sea on Boston’s North Shore, discover the stunning beauty of Cape Ann as you explore its quaint harbors, artistic charm and picturesque villages. Aboard a lobster boat, see a lobsterman hoist his catch from chilly seawaters. Learn about the famous Gloucester fishing fleet. Experience the Rocky Neck art colony and view seascapes created by Winslow Homer and Fitz Henry Lane, who called Cape Ann home. At the Essex Shipbuilding Museum, let craftsmen lead you through the history of master shipbuilding. Bite into a mouthwatering fried clam. Experience a whale watch, learn about the witch trials in historic Salem and pass by gilded mansions on the shores of Marblehead and Manchester-by-the-Sea.
Activity Level
On Your Feet
Walking 3-5 blocks over smooth surfaces; some stairs; embark/disembark boats & coach bus.

Best of all, you'll ...

  • Voyage on Cape Ann's vibrant shoreline and a tidal river on five distinctive boats as you inhale salt air, marvel at lighthouses and view the unique wildlife attracted to the rugged coast.
  • Experience a whale watch, boating three miles to Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary in hopes of spotting a finback, minke or humpback breaching the waters.
  • Sail on one of Essex’s iconic schooners, learning from the captain about the construction of this magnificent wooden vessel.
Featured Expert
All Experts
Profile Image
Jim McAllister
Jim McAllister is a Salem historian, photographer, author and teacher, and serves as a historic consultant to the City of Salem and the Hawthorne Hotel. A graduate of Stonehill College, his photographs of Salem have appeared in numerous publications, and he is the author of “Salem: From Naumkeag to Witch City” and co-author of “Salem: Cornerstones of a Historic City.” Jim has appeared on both the “History Channel” and “Home and Garden TV.”

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

Profile Image of Jim McAllister
Jim McAllister View biography
Jim McAllister is a Salem historian, photographer, author and teacher, and serves as a historic consultant to the City of Salem and the Hawthorne Hotel. A graduate of Stonehill College, his photographs of Salem have appeared in numerous publications, and he is the author of “Salem: From Naumkeag to Witch City” and co-author of “Salem: Cornerstones of a Historic City.” Jim has appeared on both the “History Channel” and “Home and Garden TV.”
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
The Perfect Storm
by Sebastian Junger
Meteorologists called the storm that hit North America's eastern seaboard in October 1991 a "perfect storm" because of the rare combination of factors that created it. For everyone else, it was perfect hell. In The Perfect Storm, author Sebastian Junger conjures for the reader the meteorological conditions that created the "storm of the century" and the impact the storm had on many of the people caught in it. Chief among these are the six crew members of the swordfish boat the Andrea Gail, all of whom were lost 500 miles from home beneath roiling seas and high waves. Working from published material, radio dialogues, eyewitness accounts, and the experiences of people who have survived similar events, Junger attempts to re-create the last moments of the Andrea Gail as well as the perilous high-seas rescues of other victims of the storm. Like a Greek drama, The Perfect Storm builds slowly and inexorably to its tragic climax. The book weaves the history of the fishing industry and the science of predicting storms into the quotidian lives of those aboard the Andrea Gail and of others who would soon find themselves in the fury of the storm. Junger does a remarkable job of explaining a convergence of meteorological and human events in terms that make them both comprehensible and unforgettable. (Amazon.com)
Lone Voyager
by Joseph Garland
Like countless Gloucester fishermen before and since, Howard Blackburn and Tom Welch were trawling for halibut on the Newfoundland banks in an open dory in 1883 when a sudden blizzard separated them from their mother ship. Alone on the empty North Atlantic, they battled towering waves and frozen spray to stay afloat. Welch soon succumbed to exposure, and Blackburn did the only thing he could: He rowed for shore. He rowed five days without food or water, with his hands frozen to the oars, to reach the coast of Newfoundland. Yet his tests had only begun. So begins Joe Garland's extraordinary account of the hero fisherman of Gloucester. Incredibly, though Blackburn lost his fingers to his icy misadventure, he went on to set a record for swiftest solo sailing voyage across the Atlantic that stood for decades. Lone Voyager is a Homeric saga of survival at sea and a thrilling portrait of the world's most fabled fishing port in the age of sail. (Product description)
Essex Shipbuilding (MA) (Images of America)
by Ellis Peckham
For three centuries, shipbuilding flourished in Essex, a small village wrapped around a shallow tidal estuary that flows into Ipswich Bay. From sturdy little Chebacco boats to the tough but graceful fishing schooners that plied the Grand Banks, Essex vessels became known throughout the maritime world as swift and strong fishermen, and Essex shipbuilding became synonymous with craftsmanship of the highest order. More than four thousand ships slid down the ways destined for ports such as Gloucester, Boston, and New York. By the middle of the twentieth century, however, the industry had vanished and this extraordinary chapter in American maritime history was closed. Essex Shipbuilding recalls an era when dozens of vessels in different stages of construction lined the Essex River and the shipyard gangs worked six days a week, year-round, in any weather. Featuring the photograph collection of Dana A. Story, Essex Shipbuilding illustrates the firms of A.D. Story and Tarr & James, who built the famous racing schooners Mayflower, Columbia, and Gertrude L. Thebaud, and the high-lining fishermen Elsie and Adventure. Essex Shipbuilding also depicts these vessels at sea-fishing, racing, or pursuing more unusual work, from Arctic exploration to naval service in both world wars to rumrunning during Prohibition.
The Last Fish Tale
by Mark Kurlansky
Starred Review. Bestselling author Kurlansky (Cod; The Big Oyster) provides a delightful, intimate history and contemporary portrait of the quintessential northeastern coastal fishing town: Gloucester, Mass., on Cape Anne. Illustrated with his own beautifully executed drawings, Kurlansky's book vividly depicts the contemporary tension between the traditional fishing trade and modern commerce, which in Gloucester means beach-going tourists. One year ago, a beach preservation group enraged fishermen by seeking to harvest 105 acres of prime fishing ground for sand to deposit on the shoreline. Wealthy yacht owners compete with fishermen for prime dockage, driving up prices. Fishermen also contend with federal limits on their catches in an effort to maintain sustainable fisheries. But while cod are protected from extinction, the fishermen are not. Some boats must go 100 or more miles out to sea—a danger for small boats with few crew members. Tragedies abound, while one, that of the swordfish boat Andrea Gail, documented by Sebastian Junger in A Perfect Storm, brought even more tourists to Gloucester. (Publishers Weekly)
The Hungry Ocean
by Linda Greenlaw
She's smart, hard-working and good at what she does, though sometimes she wishes she had a life. Greenlaw is captain of the Hannah Boden, sister ship to the Andrea Gail, the sword-fishing boat whose disappearance was described with agonizing verisimilitude in Sebastian Junger's bestseller, The Perfect Storm. Greenlaw tells a comparatively quotidian tale, "the true story of a real, and typical, sword-fishing trip, from leaving the dock to returning." Not trying to compete with Junger's operatic tale of death on the high seas, Greenlaw deals with stormy personalities rather than with bad weather. She rounds out the story with her gimlet-eyed description of a captain's biggest headache after nature itself: the crew. Racism, drug use, baffling illnesses: these are all elements of a 30-day journey for six people crammed aboard a 100-ft. boat designed less for human comfort than to carry the 50,000 pounds or more of fish it will eventually take on. But Greenlaw picks her sailors carefully and, through her own example, inspires a fierce loyalty among the men such as the one who extracted his own abscessed tooth rather than return to shore ("In my experience," she notes, "very few men are willing to pull their own teeth"). Greenlaw's narrative should foster an abiding respect in anyone who has tossed a swordfish steak on the grill, and it is certain to induce jaw-dropping admiration among personnel managers everywhere. (Publishers Weekly)
Print All
Map details are not available for this location.
View Map
Expand All
6 days
5 nights
14 meals
5 B 5 L 4 D
DAY
1
Check-in, Registration, Orientation, Welcome Dinner
Rockport
D
Rockport Inn & Suites

Activity note: Hotel check-in 3:00 p.m.

Afternoon: Program Registration. After you have your room assignment, come over to the Road Scholar table to register with the program staff and get your welcome packet containing your name-tag, up-to-date schedule that reflects any changes, other important information, and to confirm when and where the Orientation session will take place. If you arrive late, please ask for your packet when you check in. Orientation. The Group Leader will greet everyone and lead introductions. We will review the up-to-date program schedule, discuss roles and responsibilities, logistics, safety guidelines, emergency procedures, and answer questions. Please notes that due to the amount of boat activities included in this program, time and dates of activities are subject to change depending on tides and weather. Some activities may be substituted for others in the situation of inclement weather or ocean/river conditions. Depending on tides, ramps for embarking and disembarking vessels may be steep. Periods in the daily schedule designated as “Free time” and “At leisure” offer opportunities to do what you like and make your experience even more meaningful and memorable according to your personal preferences. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions. Program activities, schedules, personnel, and indicated distances or times may change due to local circumstances/conditions. In the event of changes, we will alert you as quickly as possible. Thank you for your understanding.

Dinner: At the hotel, buffet provided by a local restaurant.

Evening: At leisure. Optional video screening on the Schooner Thomas E. Lannon.

DAY
2
Schooner Sail, Rocky Neck Artist Colony, Journey Cape Ann
Rockport
B,L,D
Rockport Inn & Suites

Activity note: Walking up to 1/2 mile at a time on pavement and some uneven surfaces. Walk 50 yards on pavement from motorcoach to dock. Walk up a marine ramp with hand rails to wooden dock, walk 5 steps up and 2 steps down over gap to board boat. There is a bathroom on board, but it is down a steep flight of wooden steps so using the restroom on land before the boat departs is highly recommended. Schooner has sails and wooden benches.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: We will board a motorcoach for an educational journey around Cape Ann. This charming 2 hour drive will encompass some of the region's most stunning vistas, including Gloucester's "back shore", the winding wooded roads of Lanesville and Annisquam, the cluttered, colorful Gloucester waterfront, the famous Rocky Neck and Rockport art colonies, and the famed Gloucester Fisherman Statue. A local expert will enhance our experience with tales of early settlers and fishermen, famous artists, the inventors Clarence Birdseye and John Hays Hammond, and weird goings-on in Dogtown. We will expand our knowledge of Cape Ann artists on a historical art walk with a local expert through the Rocky Neck artist colony. We will walk in the footsteps of Winslow Homer, Fitz Henry Lane, Edward Hopper and a host of other pioneering American artists, to see first hand the iconic land and seascapes that gave rise to their illustrious artistic output.

Lunch: At a local restaurant in Rocky Neck, plated and served.

Afternoon: We will set sail aboard the Thomas E. Lannon, a ship modeled after schooners built in Essex, MA over a hundred years ago. The length of her deck is approximately 65 feet, and she drafts 9 feet. Thomas E. Lannon sails out of Gloucester harbor and offers an authentic opportunity to learn from an expert about the Gloucester fishing industry history and the role schooners played in supporting the sea side economy.

Dinner: At a local restaurant in the historic seaside town of Rockport.

Evening: At leisure.

DAY
3
Whale Watch, Lecture on Maritime Life
Rockport
B,L,D
Rockport Inn & Suites

Activity note: Embark and disembark vessel using ramps and/or stairs.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: We will listen to a lecture by a local fisherman on maritime life. Next we will depart for the Gloucester harbor. On a whale watch, we'll learn about large aquatic baleen and toothed whales from a qualified naturalists. We will have the opportunity to interact one-on-one with researchers working as trained crew members onboard the vessel. We will see real whale artifacts, and even have a chance to participate in plankton tows, water visibility analysis, and temperature measurements.

Lunch: Aboard the whale watch, boxed lunches will be provided to enjoy at your leisure.

Afternoon: Continue our exploration at sea.

Dinner: At the hotel, buffet provide by a local restaurant.

Evening: Entertaining talk by local historian and storyteller.

DAY
4
Historic Salem Harbor, Free Time
Rockport
B,L
Rockport Inn & Suites

Activity note: Walk 50 yards on pavement from motorcoach to dock. Walk on a gangplank with hand rails to dock (depending on tide the gangplank may be level or downhill). Walk 25 yards on a wooden dock to the boat, then step over gap to board boat.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: We will leave Rockport and head to historic Salem, which dates back to 1626. Here, we will enjoy a narrated cruise that brings Salem Sound to life. We will see the lovely shorelines of Salem, Marblehead, Beverly, Manchester-By-The-Sea and the Misery Islands. We’ll learn about town history, the boom and bust of the local maritime industry, ocean life, historic landmarks and the latest on the multi-million dollar estates lining the sound.

Lunch: In Salem, MA at a local restaurant, plated and served.

Afternoon: Free time. Take this opportunity for personal independent exploration to see and do what interests you most. Please refer to the list of Free Time Opportunities. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions.

Dinner: This meal has been excluded from the program cost and is on your own to enjoy what you like. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions. You might dine in Salem, Gloucester, Rockport or one of Cape Ann's other beautiful towns. All are accessible by the MBTA rail system.

Evening: At leisure.

DAY
5
Cruise on the Essex River, Essex Shipbuilding Museum
Rockport
B,L,D
Rockport Inn & Suites

Activity note: Walk along a paved ramp to a floating dock, step over a gap to board the boat. There are padded seats on the boat.

Breakfast: At hotel.

Morning: Cruise on the Essex River, located in the village of Essex, Massachusetts. Essex is one of the four communities that comprise Cape Ann, along with Gloucester, Rockport and Manchester by the Sea.

Lunch: In Essex at a classic New England restaurant who's legacy dates back to July 3, 1916 when Lawrence "Chubby" Woodman, decided to fry up a few clams at his roadside stand in Essex, creating the original fried clams.

Afternoon: We will discover the history of Essex's shipbuilding industry at the Essex Shipbuilding museum. This museum was established in 1976 as part of the town's observation of the American Revolutionary Bicentennial. It provides Essex families a local repository for their ancestors' shipbuilding artifacts, keeping them from being acquired by other museums, being sold to private collectors, or degrading in private homes. Its collections include over 7,000 rare shipbuilding artifacts, photographs, tools, documents, builder's half-models and rigged ship models

Dinner: At the hotel, farewell buffet provided by a local restaurant.

Evening: We will learn more about seafaring life and maritime stories of New England.

DAY
6
Gloucester Harbor Cruise, Program Concludes
Rockport
B,L

Activity note: Need to be able to climb 2-3 stairs to embark and disembark vessel. Check-out 11:00 a.m.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: We will find out how lobsters are harvested on a cruise aboard the Lady Jillian. On this 1-1/4 hour exploration and demonstration, we'll learn all about lobsters and lobstering.

Lunch: We will provide boxed lunches to take away with you. This concludes our program. If you are transferring to another Road Scholar program, detailed instructions are included in your Information Packet for that program. We hope you enjoy Road Scholar learning adventures and look forward to having you on rewarding programs in the future. Don’t forget to join our Facebook page and follow us on Instagram. Best wishes for all your journeys!






Your Well-Being is Our #1 Priority

We’re committed to making your experience as safe and enjoyable as possible.

See Our Safety Roadmap
Click here to provide website feedback
Website Feedback