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Online Program

Adventures Online: Croatia’s Dalmatian Coast, Dubrovnik & More

Program No. 24205RJ
From the Dalmatian Coast to the city of Dubrovnik, join our experts to explore the very best of Croatia during this live, online learning adventure!
Length
5 days
Rating (4.95)
Starts at
499

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DATES & PRICES

Online Program
Accommodation Details

Learn from the comfort of your own home.

DATES & PRICES

Online Program
Accommodation Details

Learn from the comfort of your own home.

At a Glance

Journey along the Dalmatian Coast to experience the wonders of Croatia during this live, online learning adventure! With experts including art historians and professors from Croatian universities, get a local’s look into the art, history and culture of this fascinating country. Embark on virtual field trips to the city of Dubrovnik and Diocletian’s Palace in Split, both UNESCO World Heritage Sites, to learn about two of Croatia’s most important historic landmarks. You’ll also join your experts for virtual explorations of of Sibenik, the Adriatic island of Hvar and the fortified town of Korcula to get a further look into Croatian culture and history. Through insightful lectures and lively discussions, learn about the influence of Greek and Roman civilizations, gain insight into local politics and important artworks, and most importantly, enjoy the camaraderie of your fellow Road Scholars.

Best of all, you’ll…

  • Explore Dubrovnik, a historic city and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, during an expert-led virtual field trip.
  • Enjoy a virtual field trip to Diocletian’s Palace and learn how the city of Split has grown around this important fortress and UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • Discover the town of Sibenik, the Adriatic island of Hvar and the fortified town of Korcula during virtual field trips with local experts.

General Notes

You’ll enjoy 2-3 hours of daily instruction, discussion and/or field trips, which includes sufficient breaks throughout the program. This online program is through Zoom, an easy-to-use web video service that includes closed captioning. All you need is an Internet connection and your computer. We’ll provide a how-to guide to make sure you’ll have a hassle-free experience. This session is offered live only and will not be available on demand. Please review the daily itinerary for start and end times to ensure you won’t miss a minute of this live experience. All times are listed in the EASTERN time zone. If you live in a different time zone, please adjust your schedule accordingly.
Featured Expert
All Experts
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Vedran Barbaric
Dr. Vedran Barbaric is an Assistant Professor and Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Split, Croatia. Throughout his professional career, he has dedicated himself to the research and communication of various aspects of cultural heritage of the Eastern Adriatic area. These interests provide his impetus for presenting the continuity of cultural change in this interesting area of the Mediterranean to Road Scholar groups.

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

Profile Image of Luci Duzevic
Luci Duzevic View biography
Luci Duzevic has a Master’s degree in Art History, French language and literature from the University of Zagreb, Croatia. She has studied at VERN University of Applied Sciences as well as the professional exam for local expert in Zagreb. Luci is a member of the Attaché’s Club in Zagreb, part of the Croatian Olympic Committee. She spent her childhood on the Island of Korcula where she has developed a deep interest in art, history, literature and traveling. She currently lives in Zagreb.
Profile Image of Lovro Kuncevic
Lovro Kuncevic View biography
Lovro Kuncevic received his PhD in medieval studies from Central European University, Budapest, in 2012. He is currently research associate at the Institute for Historical Sciences of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts in Regusa (Dubrovnik.) His main interests are the history of diplomacy and institutions of medieval and early modern city-republics, primarily Ragusa and Venice. His award-winning thesis focused on how Ragusans represented their city-state during its golden age. He has also taught courses of medieval history at the University of Dubrovnik.
Profile Image of Vedran Barbaric
Vedran Barbaric View biography
Dr. Vedran Barbaric is an Assistant Professor and Vice-Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Split, Croatia. Throughout his professional career, he has dedicated himself to the research and communication of various aspects of cultural heritage of the Eastern Adriatic area. These interests provide his impetus for presenting the continuity of cultural change in this interesting area of the Mediterranean to Road Scholar groups.
Profile Image of Alen Soldo
Alen Soldo View biography
Alen Soldo is a tenured professor at the Department of Marine Studies, University of Split. Currently, he is the head of Applied Marine Sciences postgraduate doctoral study. His areas of expertise are fisheries, marine biodiversity, management of living resources, marine biology and ecology, conservation, and scientific diving. He is also an expert on sharks and co-chair of the IUCN Shark Specialist Group for the Mediterranean. So far, he authored seven scientific books, more than a hundred research papers, and several hundred expert papers.
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Yugoslavia, Death of a Nation
by Laura Silber, Allan Little
Called "one of the finest volumes to come out of the war" by the New York Times, this book combines eyewitness reports, political commentary and documentary photographs to elucidate the origins and aftermath of the breakup of Yugoslavia.
Zagreb, A Cultural History
by Celia Hawkesworth
An illuminating account of the tumultuous but vibrant history of Croatia's capital, with a strong focus on the art and architecture of the city.
DK Eyewitness Top Ten Dubrovnik & Dalmatian Coast
by Eyewitness Guides
This slim guide, geared for visitors on a short stay, features color photographs and maps.
The Balkan Express
by Slavenka Drakulic
The celebrated Croatian writer describes life in Zagreb during the 1991-1995 Croatian War of Independence in this series of essays, detailing the ways the war encroached upon daily life and eliminated all sense of normality.
The Balkans, A Short History
by Mark Mazower
With eloquence and clarity, Mazower addresses issues of geography, nationalism and nation in this indispensable survey.
A Traveller's History of Croatia
by Benjamin Curtis
Curtis untangles with alacrity the complex history of this nation at the crossroads of Europe.
Eyewitness Guide Croatia
by Eyewitness Guides
Gorgeously illustrated and filled with excellent maps, this compact book offers a thorough overview of Croatia's history, traditions, cultures and sights.
How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed
by Slavenka Drakulic
These short essays capture the absurdity, struggle and day-to-day reality of being a woman in Yugoslavia under communism. Drakulic is an award-winning Croatian journalist and novelist.
Croatia Coast Map
by Freytag & Berndt
A nicely shaded map covering the Dalmatian Coast from Porec to Dubrovnik at a scale of 1:200,000, perfect for the complex coastline.
Black Lamb and Grey Falcon: A Journey Through Yugoslavia
by Rebecca West, Christopher Hitchens (Introduction)
First published in 1941, this monumental work explores the complex history of Yugoslavia, its heroes, politics and culture. It's a big, challenging book -- some call it the best ever written on the Balkans.
Croatia, A Nation Forged in War
by Marcus Tanner
A modern history of Croatia, from its medieval origins to Nazi occupation to the present day, written by the British correspondent who reported from the region during the events of 1993.
The Bridge on the Drina
by Ivo Andric, Lovette F. Edwards (Translator)
These linked stories by the Nobel Prize-winning author capture the history and complexity of Christian and Muslim relations during Ottoman occupation. Hewn of stone, the bridge dividing the town of Visegrad was Andric's inspiration.
City of Fortune, How Venice Ruled the Seas
by Roger Crowley
Crowley spins tales of three centuries of plunder and plague, imperial conquest and piracy in this riveting new history, chronicling the transformation of a tiny city of lagoon dwellers into the richest place on earth.
Balkan Ghosts, A Journey through History
by Robert D. Kaplan
Kaplan interweaves history, art and culture with his travels through Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Romania and Greece in this regional portrait.
Dubrovnik, A History
by Robin Harris
Harris, a journalist who writes frequently on the Balkans, presents a comprehensive portrait of the historically important maritime city-state in this nicely illustrated, scholarly and readable history of Dubrovnik.
Death and the Dervish
by Mesa Selimovic
The tale of Sheikh Nuruddin, the self-serving dervish of the title, set during Ottoman rule in 18th-century Bosnia. Selimovic (1910-1982) was a well-known Bosnian Muslim author.
The Hired Man
by Aminatta Forna
When Duro Kolak encounters a strange car in his small Croatian village of Gost, he offers its British occupants assistance in setting up a summer cottage. But tensions soon develop between the village residents and the foreigners, as painful memories from the Croatian War of Independence are revived.
Palgrave Concise Historical Atlas of the Balkans
by Dennis Hupchick
The changing borders and complex history of the Balkans are clearly and concisely shown through 50 double-page maps and accompanying essays, organized chronologically.
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5 days
DAY
1
Dalmatian history, Diocletian Palace and Split
From the comfort of your own home.

Activity note: All times noted are Eastern Time. Today’s session will begin at 11:00 a.m. and end at 2:40 p.m.

Morning: 11:00 a.m. Orientation & Introductions (40 minutes). Our Study Leader will greet everyone and provide an overview of the program and today’s schedule including Zoom protocol. We will then say hello to one another and share our interests and expectations. 11:30 a.m. Lecture (60 minutes). Our Study Leader will give us a historical review of Dalmatia, the region at the southern end of modern Croatia. It was named for the Dalmatae tribe that occupied the area in the 1st century CE. While it once controlled vast swaths of territory, Dalmatia later became concentrated along the Adriatic coast. With the Adriatic blending into the Mediterranean and vice-versa, there was extensive interaction between Dalmatians and people of other lands. We will learn about the first inhabitants, economic and political development, the arrival of Slavic tribes, and divisions of the territory as well as its position and hopes today.

Afternoon: 12:40 p.m. Break (20 minutes). 1:00 p.m. Virtual field trip (60 minutes). We will “explore” the living city of Split. Situated on the eastern shore of the Mediterranean, it was founded as a Greek settlement in ancient times. Its urban development was spurred by the building of a palace in 295 CE for the Roman emperor Diocletian, who had been born not far from here in Salona. We will see highlights of Diocletian’s Palace, one of the best-preserved Roman monuments in the world. Later inhabitants made modifications that changed the original appearance, but we can still marvel at Diocletian’s retirement home. It is part of the UNESCO-designated World Heritage Site. As we “stroll” around some of the streets, we’ll learn about the palace-fortress, its transformation within the original walls, and adaptation to modern life. 2:00 p.m. Interactive Q&A (40 minutes) with wrap-up and notes for tomorrow. 2:40 p.m. Today’s session will end.

DAY
2
Šibenik, UNESCO heritage, village of Draga, Ivan Mestrovic
From the comfort of your own home.

Activity note: All times noted are Eastern Time. Today’s session will begin at 11:00 a.m. and end at 2:05 p.m.

Morning: 11:00 a.m. Review of the day (5 minutes). 11:05 a.m. Virtual field trip (60 minutes). We will go on a virtual exploration of Šibenik in central Dalmatia, the first town on the Adriatic founded by Croats. We’ll learn about people from the local area who contributed to world history. As we explore, we will experience the charm and become acquainted with traditional housing and learn about local life. We’ll also see famed St. Jacob’s cathedral, an architectural masterpiece of the Renaissance that is a UNESCO-designated World Heritage Site. From the UNESCO inscription: “The Cathedral of St James in Šibenik (1431-1535), on the Dalmatian coast, bears witness to the considerable exchanges in the field of monumental arts between Northern Italy, Dalmatia and Tuscany in the 15th and 16th centuries.”

Afternoon: 12:05 p.m. Break (20 minutes). 12:25 p.m. Lecture (60 minutes). Ivan Mestrovic (1883-1962) was one of the most famous and influential Croatian artists, a creator of many important Croatian cultural landmarks who left a significant trace in American culture as well. We will learn the stories behind a number of exceptional masterworks both in Croatia and in the United States, where he emigrated after World War II. We will study stylistic and iconographic features of his art as well as details of his professional and personal life during one of the most turbulent times in history: the first half of the 20th century. 1:25 p.m. Interactive Q&A (40 minutes) with wrap-up and notes for tomorrow. 2:05 p.m. Today’s session will end.

DAY
3
Hvar& Stari Grad, Cultural overview from Greeks to present
From the comfort of your own home.

Activity note: All times noted are Eastern Time. Today’s session will begin at 11:00 a.m. and end at 2:05 p.m.

Morning: 11:00 a.m. Review of the day (5 minutes). 11:05 a.m. Virtual field trip (60 minutes). We will learn about the Adriatic island of Hvar, where Greek colonizers founded the ancient town of Faros — now Stari Gradi — circa 384 BCE. We’ll hear of Greek traces in the area and the economy of ancient Dalmatia as a base for today’s olive oil and wine production. We’ll also learn how people live on the island today with their local customs and traditions.

Afternoon: 12:05 p.m. Break (20 minutes). 12:25 p.m. Lecture (60 minutes). We will be joined by Professor Vedran Barbaric, a member of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Science at the University of Split, who will tell us about cultural dynamics on the central Dalmatian islands since antiquity. Their geographical position was the key to dynamic processes that shaped the cultural geography of this area. We will learn about changes that shaped early history and go from prehistoric seafarers to Greek ships sailing to the granaries of the northern Adriatic, to Romans selecting this as one of the desirable regions, and as the final frontier of Slavic expansion due south. 1:25 p.m. Interactive Q&A (40 minutes) with wrap-up and notes for tomorrow. 2:05 p.m. Today’s session will end.

DAY
4
Korcula & the Mediterranean Kaleidoscope, The Adriatic Sea
From the comfort of your own home.

Activity note: All times noted are Eastern Time. Today’s session will begin at 11:00 a.m. and end at 2:05 p.m.

Morning: 11:00 a.m. Review of the day (5 minutes). 11:05 a.m. Virtual field trip (60 minutes). During this virtual encounter, we will explore Korcula, a historic fortified town on the protected east coast of the island of the same name. It is an ancient place imbued with numerous legends. One is that it was founded by refugees from Troy; another is that Marco Polo was born here. The old city is surrounded by walls where narrow streets hold the rich history of palaces, people, churches, ships, and travels. Korcula has a venerable maritime history as well as a distinctive musical heritage. We will see the ruins of a house that was the purported home of Marco Polo and learn about Moreska, a sword dance performed here for centuries as highlight of local life.

Afternoon: 12:05 p.m. Break (20 minutes). 12:25 p.m. Lecture (60 minutes). Professor Alen Soldo of the Department of Marine Studies at the University of Split will join us for a presentation on the Adriatic Sea and its living resources. The Adriatic is a gulf in the northernmost part of the Mediterranean. During most of the Tertiary Age, this was part of the primeval Tethys Ocean. Today, the Adriatic is a relatively shallow sea, home to between 6,000 and 7,000 plant and animal species, although new species are constantly being discovered. There are more than 440 fish species and subspecies, approximately 70% of the known fish species and subspecies in the Mediterranean. 1:25 p.m. Interactive Q&A (30 minutes) with wrap-up and notes for tomorrow. 1:55 p.m. Today’s session will end.

DAY
5
Dubrovnik - Pearl of the Adriatic, Republic of Ragusa
From the comfort of your own home.

Activity note: All times noted are Eastern Time. Today’s session will begin at 11:00 a.m. and end at 2:05 p.m.

Morning: 11:00 a.m. Review of the day (5 minutes). 11:05 a.m. Virtual field trip (60 minutes). We will explore Dubrovnik — dubbed “the pearl of the Adriatic” by Lord Byron — and one of UNESCO’s most renowned World Heritage Sites. It was founded in the 7th century CE and then known as Ragusa. There were defensive walls from the earliest days. The magnificent stone ramparts we see today encircling the Old City were constructed from the 12th through the 17th centuries. We will learn about Ragusa as we “walk” through streets that have existed for centuries. Dubrovnik was its own free republic for more than 400 years in an exceptionally turbulent period in European history. We’ll become acquainted with its diplomatic and political achievements as well as its geopolitical importance on the border between western and Eastern world, and their effect on contemporary life. From the UNESCO inscription: “The ‘Pearl of the Adriatic’, situated on the Dalmatian coast, became an important Mediterranean sea power from the 13th century onwards. Although severely damaged by an earthquake in 1667, Dubrovnik managed to preserve its beautiful Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque churches, monasteries, palaces and fountains. Damaged again in the 1990s by armed conflict, it is now the focus of a major restoration programme co-ordinated by UNESCO.”

Afternoon: 12:05 p.m. Break (20 minutes). 12:25 p.m. Lecture (60 minutes). We will be joined by Professor Lovro Kuncevic, a researcher at the Institute for Historical Sciences of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts. He will provide a detailed picture of the Republica Ragusina — the Republic of Ragusa (Dubrovnik) — that existed from 1358 until 1808 and how this city-state managed to preserve its independence surrounded by superpowers such as the Ottoman Empire and the Venetian Republic. We’ll learn about the peculiar political system with one of the most rigidly aristocratic constitutions in European history, for centuries ruled by a closed hereditary patrician caste. A key to the republic’s success for almost five centuries was its enormous importance as a trading mediator between the Ottoman and Christian worlds. We may be surprised to learn of the elaborate system to deal with the prevention of epidemics, primarily the plague, with familiar ideas of quarantine, self-isolation, and lockdown. 1:25 p.m. Interactive Q&A (30 minutes) and wrap-up. We will also say our farells. 1:55 p.m. This concludes our program.






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