loading spinner
Japan

Northern Japan: Ancient History and Scenic Beauty

Program No. 23090RJ
Experience a uniquely beautiful side of Japan as you venture back to its roots through ancient temples, elaborate shrines, and colorful gardens on expert-led excursions.

Enroll with Confidence

We want your Road Scholar learning adventure to be something to look forward to—not worry about. Learn more

Protecting the Environment

We offset a portion of the emissions created by your travel. Learn more

Prefer to enroll or inquire by phone? 800-454-5768
Select your type of room
Price will update based on selection
Prices displayed below are based on per person,doubleoccupancy.
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Filling Fast!
May 28 - Jun 10, 2024
Starting at
6,799
Itinerary Note

We stay in Lake Tazawa-ko, instead of Hanamaki Onsen, on this program date.

Filling Fast!
Sep 10 - Sep 23, 2024
Starting at
6,799
Itinerary Note

We stay in Lake Tazawa-ko, instead of Hanamaki Onsen, on this program date.

May 27 - Jun 9, 2025
Starting at
7,149
Sep 16 - Sep 29, 2025
Starting at
7,149
Sep 30 - Oct 13, 2025
Starting at
7,149
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
May 28 - Jun 10, 2024
Starting at
7,449
Itinerary Note

We stay in Lake Tazawa-ko, instead of Hanamaki Onsen, on this program date.

Sep 10 - Sep 23, 2024
Starting at
7,449
Itinerary Note

We stay in Lake Tazawa-ko, instead of Hanamaki Onsen, on this program date.

Filling Fast!
May 27 - Jun 9, 2025
Starting at
7,829
Sep 16 - Sep 29, 2025
Starting at
7,829
Filling Fast!
Sep 30 - Oct 13, 2025
Starting at
7,829

At a Glance

Tucked in the shadows of silver skyscrapers and swept aside by bustling city dwellers live the ancient traditions that are sometimes forgotten amidst Japan’s modern lifestyle. Take a step back and enjoy Northern Japan’s famously colorful landscapes as you explore winding stone pathways that lead to a rich history of indigenous people who settled here centuries ago. Learn from local historians as you travel through wildflower gardens leading to intricate shrines and discover temples once belonging to monks in ascetic retreat. Time stands still as you experience a side of Japan few have seen and learn about the ancient history and untouched beauty that blends into the modern country we know today.
Activity Level
Let's Go!
Walking up to 5 miles daily.
Small Group
Small Group
Love to learn and explore in a small-group setting? These adventures offer small, personal experiences with groups of 13 to 24 participants.

Best of all, you’ll…

  • Explore the intricate shrine complex in Nikko and learn the history behind them with local experts.
  • Follow the route of the famous Edo-period poet, Matsuo Basho on a boat ride to Matsushima, one of the most beautiful places in Japan.
  • Discover one of the most elaborately decorated Buddhist structures in the country, the Chuson-ji temple.
Featured Expert
All Experts
Profile Image
John McBride
After studying in Japan and Australia, John McBride began his career at the Australia-Japan Research Centre/Australian National University. He joined Ansett Australia and later became Chief Executive of News Corporation Japan. Returning to live in Sydney, John has continued his interest in matching texts about ancient, natural, and contemporary history with walking in both Australia and Japan. He was made a Member of the Order of Australia for his support of Australia-Japan cultural and business links, and for supporting young artists and arts institutions.

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

Profile Image of John McBride
John McBride View biography
After studying in Japan and Australia, John McBride began his career at the Australia-Japan Research Centre/Australian National University. He joined Ansett Australia and later became Chief Executive of News Corporation Japan. Returning to live in Sydney, John has continued his interest in matching texts about ancient, natural, and contemporary history with walking in both Australia and Japan. He was made a Member of the Order of Australia for his support of Australia-Japan cultural and business links, and for supporting young artists and arts institutions.
Profile Image of Kathleen Aoki
Kathleen Aoki View biography
Kathleen Aoki majored in Latin American Studies, but an opportunity to teach English in Japan led her to discover her second home — Nagasaki. A twenty-five career at a major Japanese electronics manufacturer in Tokyo followed, where Kathleen learned the business culture of corporate Japan. During this time she married, raised a family and did her stint of PTA duty. With her kids almost grown, Kathleen decided to begin a career as an instructor making the most of her interest in travel and knowledge of Japan.
Profile Image of Shima Enomoto
Shima Enomoto View biography
Shima Enomoto was born and raised in Tokyo. She has a master’s from Columbia Business School, working in finance at global investment banks for twenty years. Wishing to spend more time with her family, Shima relocated to Durham, N.C., where her husband was a professor at Duke University. While living abroad, Shima realized she wanted to share her home country with others, joining Walk Japan in 2013 and Road Scholar in 2016. She loves promoting the appreciation and consumption of sake when in the U.S.
Profile Image of Kaori Irwin
Kaori Irwin View biography
Kaori was born in Kyoto City and lived in Gifu and Aomori Prefectures in her youth. She showed great interest in foreign cultures from an early age and studied English literature and education at Kansai Gaidai, a university in Osaka. She lives on the outskirts of Yamagata City with her Northern Irish husband; she has taught English at the secondary level and established a private English language school. She has a great love of cooking which stems from her days helping in her parents' restaurant.
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
The Samurai
by Shusaku Endo
This historical novel by one of Japan's best-known modern writers is set in the world of the 17th-century Samurai. A Roman Catholic, Endo explored Christianity and morals in his many novels and stories.
Kyoto, A Cultural History
by John Dougill
A rich portrait and guide to the gardens, monasteries, art, history and culture of Kyoto, once Japan's capital, founded 1,200-years ago.
The Little Book of Japan
by Charlotte Anderson & Gorazd Vilhar
Veteran Japanophiles Vilhar and Anderson produced this illuminating collection of 44 essays on Japanese life and culture, which, even in the 21st century remains elusive and poorly understood.
Where the Dead Pause, and the Japanese Say Goodbye
by Marie Mutsuki Mockett
When her American father passes away, Mockett seeks consolation in her mother’s home country of Japan. She visits a radiation zone, a Buddhist school, temples and festivals in an effort to understand the Japanese way of grieving, to bury her dead and find healing.
Hiroshima
by John Hersey
This classic book, first published in 1946, has been hailed as the greatest piece of journalism in the 20th century. Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Hersey puts a human face on the Hiroshima tragedy through interviews with survivors.
Culture Smart! Japan
by Paul Norbury
A concise, no-nonsense guide to local customs, etiquette and culture, this is a helpful travel tool for visitors to Japan.
Japan Adventure Map
by National Geographic Society
Printed on waterproof and tear-resistant paper, this double-sided map shows all the islands of Japan at a scale of 1:1,300,000.
Eyewitness Guide Japan
by Eyewitness Guides
Dazzling illustrations, architectural cutaways and color photographs, along with useful local maps, give this guide to Japan's many attractions a distinct edge.
Learning to Bow, Inside the Heart of Japan
by Bruce Feiler
As surprising, helpful and informative as it is funny, this is an insightful account of travels and teaching in Japan. Feiler presents anecdotes on the rituals, personality traits and cultural peccadilloes of the Japanese.
A Traveller's History of Japan
by Richard Tames
A lively and concise narrative history of Japan and its transformation from Shinto, Shogun and Samurai traditions to 20th-century powerhouse.
Lonely Planet Japanese Phrasebook
by Yoshi Abe
A handy palm-sized guide to pronunciation, basic grammar and essential vocabulary for the traveler.
Walking the Kiso Road: A Modern-Day Exploration of Old Japan
by William Scott Wilson
William Scott Wilson travels along the ancient Kiso Road, historically used by samurai and warlords and relatively unchanged today. As he makes his way, Wilson engagingly ruminates on Japanese history, culture and folklore.
The Book of Tokyo: A City in Short Fiction
by Michael Emmerich (Editor)
This anthology of contemporary Japanese short stories was edited with the traveler in mind. The ten pieces of literature, mystery, science fiction and horror form an imaginary tour of the city of Tokyo.
The Inland Sea
by Donald Richie
Richie's masterpiece, more than a travel account, is a beautiful reflection on all things Japanese by one of its most acute observers.
The Dog Shogun: The Personality and Policies of Tokugawa Tsunayoshi
by Beatrice Bodart-Bailey
Largely focusing on the so-called Dog Shogun, this book also covers the history before and after and argues that his policies are to a large extent responsible for Japan's rapid modernization in the 19th century.
In Praise of Shadows
by Junichiro Tanizaki
This extended essay by the great Japanese novelist, first published in 1933, offers tremendous insight into traditional Japanese art, architecture and design.
Super Sushi Ramen Express
by Michael Booth
Using keen insight and sarcastic wit, Booth describes the cuisine and culture of Japan as he recaps the nearly three months-long foodie road trip he and his family took through the island nation. A fun journey, sure to both entertain and inform.
The Book of Tea
by Kakuzo Okakura
A graceful, witty meditation on Japanese aesthetics and culture as reflected through the tea ceremony. A celebrity and cultural ambassador, Okakura was a curator at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts.
Memoirs of a Geisha, A Novel
by Arthur Golden
The runaway best-selling novel about a geisha in the celebrated Gion district of Kyoto. A major feat of literary impersonation, the novel is rich in period detail and ceremony.
Thousand Cranes
by Yasunari Kawabata, Edward G. Seidensticker (Translator)
This novella by the great Kawabata may be Japan's best-known literary work, a story of love, grief and redemption. Kawabata's prose is as economical as the tea ceremony itself and very beautiful.
Japan's Cuisines
by Eric C. Rath
This illustrated overview charts the transformation of Japanese cuisine over the ages, revealing the influences of private and public institutions, exploring the rise of tea and showing how lunch became a gourmet meal.
The Art of Setting Stones & Other Writings from the Japanese Garden
by Marc P. Keane
In these lyrical essays, Kyoto resident and landscape architect Marc Peter Keane uses eight Japanese gardens as bases for essays on nature, religion and aesthetics. His rich, meditative excursions find beauty in garden composition - every element gaining importance and interconnectedness.
Bending Adversity, Japan and the Art of Survival
by David Pilling
Financial Times Asia editor Pilling captures the dynamism and diversity of Japan after the 2011 tsunami. He interviews, among many, novelist Haruki Murakami, former prime minister Junichiro Koizumi, industrialists, bankers, activists and artists, teenagers and octogenarians.
Tokyo, A Biography
by Stephen Mansfield
In his 500-year history of Tokyo, Mansfield presents the Japanese capital as an "indestructible organism" that has survived bombs, earthquakes and radiation and continues to thrive. An easy introduction to a fascinating city.
Kaempfer's Japan: Tokugawa Culture Observed
by Beatrice Bodart-Bailey
A good account of what it was like to travel in the Tokugawa period.
Print All
Map details are not available for this location.
View Map
Expand All
14 days
13 nights
30 meals
12 B 9 L 9 D
DAY
1
In Transit to Program
In Flight
DAY
2
Arrive Tokyo, Check-in, Orientation, Welcome Dinner
Tokyo
D
Hotel Kazusaya

Activity note: Hotel check-in available from 2:00 p.m. Meet group in hotel lobby at 6:45 p.m.

Afternoon: Transfer to and settle into the hotel. This program will be accompanied by both a Group Leader, who will primarily handle logistics, and a Study Leader who will lead most lectures and field trips, unless otherwise specified. Meals will include water and tea; other beverages will be available for purchase. Periods in the daily schedule designated as “Free time” and “At leisure” offer opportunities to do what you like and make your experience even more meaningful and memorable according to your personal preferences. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions. Program activities, schedules, personnel, and indicated distances or times may change due to local circumstances/conditions. In the event of changes, we will alert you as quickly as possible. Thank you for your understanding.

Dinner: At the hotel, we’ll have a tasty buffet meal for our Welcome Dinner, plus coffee, tea, water; other beverages available for purchase.

Evening: At leisure. Continue getting to know your fellow Road Scholars, settle in, and get a good night’s rest for the day ahead.

DAY
3
A Modern Metropolis with a touch of traditional Japan
Tokyo
B,L,D
Hotel Kazusaya

Activity note: Walking approximately 5 to 6 miles throughout the day; gentle pace. Use of transportation including assorted rail and subway transfers; about 2 hours total; some stairs, flat city streets, elevators/escalators sometimes available. Shoes may need to be removed to visit some of the sites today.

Breakfast: At the hotel, we’ll enjoy a breakfast buffet with juice, coffee, tea, water.

Morning: We’ll begin in a lecture room in the hotel with orientation, where we will review the up-to-date program schedule, discuss roles and responsibilities, and logistics, followed by a talk given by our Study Leader on the mega metropolis of Tokyo. Afterwards, we will use Tokyo's efficient train system to go to Shinjuku, one of the city's most interesting areas, where many of the movie "Lost in Translation" scenes were filmed. Passing through the "Skyscraper District", we will head up to the Observation Deck in the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building for 360 degree views of the city.

Lunch: In a local restaurant.

Afternoon: Following our Study Leader, we’ll head out to spend the afternoon walking through the Omotesando neighborhood of Tokyo. Originally made as the main approach to Meiji Shrine, Omotesando is reminiscent of an Eurporean Boulevard, lined with trees and trendy shops. As we walk, we will see some fascinating architecture before visiting a nearby art museum, whose impressive collection will allow us a glimpse into the fine arts of the region.

Dinner: At a local restaurant.

Evening: At leisure.

DAY
4
Japanese Food & Cooking, Asakusa
Tokyo
B,L
Hotel Kazusaya

Activity note: Walking approximately 4 to 5 miles throughout the day; gentle pace. Use of transportation including assorted rail and subway transfers; about 2 hours total; some stairs, flat city streets, elevators/escalators sometimes available. Shoes may need to be removed to visit some of the sites today.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: We start the day with a presentation on Japanese food. Textures and smells are just as important as taste in Japanese cooking and we learn about why this is as well as the history of Japanese food. This is followed by an excursion to a part of Tokyo with a focus on the culinary delights of 'Washoku' Japanese cuisine.

Lunch: In a local restaurant.

Afternoon: We carry on to Asakusa, once the cultural and social epicenter of pre-War Tokyo, and still home to the oldest temple, Senso-ji, in the city. In addition to the hustle and bustle of the temple grounds, we will get a taste of “Old Tokyo” and how much of the city still lives. The journey into Japanese food, particularly traditional snacks, continues throughout our afternoon. We will then return to the hotel with some time to freshen up before your free evening in Tokyo.

Dinner: This meal has been excluded from the program cost and is on your own to enjoy what you like. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions.

Evening: At leisure. Be sure to prepare for check-out and transfer in the morning. Main luggage will be collected in the morning and sent to Sendai via overnight courier; be sure to pack overnight belongings in a daypack for our stay in Utsunomiya.

DAY
5
Train to Nikko, Toshogu Shrine, Tokugawa Resting Place
Utsunomiya
B,L,D
Candeo Hotel Utsunomiya

Activity note: Luggage will be sent by overnight courier before check-out and transfer; be sure to pack overnight belongings in a daypack as we will be without main luggage in Utsunomiya. Train ride to Nikko is about 100 miles; approx. 2.5 hours. Train ride to Utsunomiya is 40 minutes. Walking about 3 to 4 miles throughout the day; gentle pace. Shoes may need to be removed to visit some of the sites.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: An early start this morning. Once checked out of the hotel, we will take taxis to the train station for our transfer by rail from Tokyo to Nikko.

Lunch: At a local restaurant.

Afternoon: After lunch, we will head for Toshogu Shrine. Led by our Study Leader along an impressive path lined with ancient cedar trees that visitors and pilgrims would traditionally have taken to approach, we’ll arrive at Toshogu Shrine, a lavishly decorated complex that is the final resting place of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the first Shogun of the Edo-period (1603 – 1868). After our field trip we will transfer back to Utsunomiya by train to our accommodation and check in.

Dinner: At a local restaurant.

Evening: At leisure. Be sure to prepare for check-out and transfer in the morning.

DAY
6
Japan's Northern Provinces
Sendai
B,L,D
Daiwa Roynet Hotel Sendai

Activity note: Bullet train ride to Sendai is approx. 160 miles; about 1 hour. Walking about 3 miles total throughout the day in museum and fortress ruins; mostly flat and even, some stairs. Shoes may need to be removed to visit some of the sights today.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: Another early start this morning. After checking out of the hotel, we’ll transfer by Shinkansen bullet train from Utsunomiya to Sendai and the nearby Sendai City Museum where we will enjoy a lecture about the city given by our Study Leader. Following the lecture, local volunteers will guide through the comprehensive exhibitions, with the opportunity to explore independently thereafter.

Lunch: At a local restaurant.

Afternoon: We’ll then go on an exploratory walk with our Study Leader through the ruins of Aoba Castle. Built in 1600 by the Date (Dah-teh) clan, the castle stood on Mt. Aoba, 100 meters high, overlooking Sendai.

Dinner: At a restaurant near to our centrally located hotel.

Evening: At leisure.

DAY
7
Matsuo Basho's Bays of Japan, Matsushima, Zuigan-ji Temple
Sendai
B,L
Daiwa Roynet Hotel Sendai

Activity note: Train rides roundtrip total approx. 25 miles; about 1 hour combined. Boat ride to Matsushima is about 6 miles; approx. 1/2 hour. Walking approx. 2 to 3 miles throughout the day; mostly flat roads/pavement, some steps. Shoes may need to be removed to visit some of the sights today.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: A short local rail journey will take us from Sendai to Matsushima-Kaigan port, where we will board a boat that will take us in and around the islands of Matsushima Bay, partially tracing the route that the famous Edo-period poet, Matsuo Basho, took on his sea journey to Matsushima, renowned for being one of the three most beautiful places in Japan.

Lunch: In a local restaurant.

Afternoon: Arriving in Matsushima, we’ll take a stroll through the precincts of Matsushima’s historic (and UNESCO registered) Zen temple, Zuigan-ji, where caves carved into a rock face once accommodated monks in ascetic retreat. Then we’ll move on to the nearby Entsu-in, famed for its beautiful gardens and pond, before returning by rail to Sendai.

Dinner: On your own to explore the local fare.

Evening: Evening – At leisure. Be sure to prepare for check-out and transfer in the morning. Main luggage will be collected in the morning and sent to Hanamaki via overnight courier; be sure to pack overnight belongings in a daypack for the first night of our stay in Hanamaki.

DAY
8
Reign of the Fujiwara, Hiraizumi, Konjiki-do “Golden Hall”
Hanamaki Onsen
B,L,D
Hotel Shidotaira

Activity note: Bullet Train Ride, approximately 30 minutes; driving approx.. 45 miles, 65 minutes. Walking approximately 3~4 miles throughout the day; mostly flat, but some paved inclines and some steps. Shoes may need to be removed to visit some of the sites.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: After checking out of the hotel, we will board the shinkansen bullet train for a short journey to Ichinoseki. After arrival, we visit an indigo dyeing studio, for a hands-on experience making our own “tenegui” hand towels made using traditional dyeing methods in a very traditional deep blue color. Boarding our coach, we transfer to Hiraizumi, one of mainland Japan's newest UNESCO World Heritage Sites. During the reign of the Fujiwara clan (866-1184), Hiraizumi was said to rival Kyoto in grandeur and sophistication. Now though, the only significant reminders of this past glory are the temples of Chuson-ji and Motsu-ji. Upon arrival, our first stop will be the excellent new World Heritage Visitor Center where we will learn from our Study Leader about the decline of the Fujiwaras, the demise of Hiraizumi as a cultural and religious center, and Japan’s Warring States Period (approx.1450-1600).

Lunch: At a nearby restaurant.

Afternoon: Our next site visit will be to the Konjiki-do, or Golden Hall of Chuson-ji, which has been reconstructed and is probably the most elaborately decorated Buddhist structure in Japan. Konjiki-do is a National Treasure and the only 12th century structure to have survived at Chuson-ji Temple. We’ll then travel onward to Hanamaki, and our Japanese accommodation, a ryokan, for two nights.

Dinner: Buffet dinner at the ryokan or Kaiseki meal at the ryokan. Tea and water included; other beverages available for purchase.

Evening: At leisure.

DAY
9
Traditional Architecture, Local History and Literature
Hanamaki Onsen
B,L,D
Hotel Shidotaira

Activity note: Transfer by private shuttle, driving approx. 55 miles throughout the day, about 2 hours total; 28 miles and 50 minutes in the morning and 27 miles and 65 minutes in the afternoon. Walking approx. 4 miles during the day. Mostly flat, some steps.

Breakfast: At the ryokan, we’ll be treated to a tasty breakfast buffet.

Morning: Transferring via coach, we’ll travel to a nearby open air architectural “History Theme Park”, where will be able to walk through traditional Japanese buildings from various time periods and social classes. Also well-known for its seasonal flora, as well as being used as locations for many period films and TV shows.

Lunch: At a local restaurant.

Afternoon: Again boarding our bus, we head back to Hanamaki, where we stop by a museum dedicated to local author, Miyazawa Kenji, famed novelist, poet, and social activist. He is particular well-known and beloved as a author of children’s literature. After that, we will visit a local history museum, where we will get a chance to explore the rhythms of the region’s lifestyles. A neighboring Sake Brewer’s museum affords the opportunity to sample the local tipple for those inclined.

Dinner: plated meal at the ryokan. Tea and water included; other beverages available for purchase.

Evening: At leisure. Be sure to prepare for check-out and transfer in the morning.

DAY
10
Sannai Maruyama Archaeological Site, Aomori Museum of Art
Aomori
B,L,D
Daiwa Roynet Aomori

Activity note: Luggage will be sent by overnight courier before check-out and transfer; be sure to pack overnight belongings in a daypack as we will be without main luggage for our first night in Aomori. Train ride is approx. 120 miles to Aomori; about 2 hours. Walking approx. 3 miles around the exhibition center and art museum. Shoes may need to be removed to visit some of the sites.

Breakfast: Ryokan buffet.

Morning: Once checked out of our ryokan and taking the shuttle bus to the train station, we’ll transfer by rail from Lake Tazawa-ko to Aomori.

Lunch: At a local restaurant.

Afternoon: After lunch, we visit the Sannai Maruyama Archaeological Site and the adjacent Jomon Jiyukan exhibition center for another look into the lives of the earliest inhabitants of Japan. The area comprises one of the largest and best-preserved Jomon Era (13000 – 300BC) settlements in Japan. Then we're off to the Aomori Museum of Art, which was designed in the style of a Jomon-period building. We will have time to view the permanent collections here together with our Study Leader and have some time to explore independently before making our way to our accommodation in the center of the city.

Dinner: At a local restaurant.

Evening: At leisure. Be sure to prepare for check-out and transfer in the morning.

DAY
11
Hirosaki Castle and the Fujita Memorial Garden
Aomori
B,L
Daiwa Roynet Aomori

Activity note: 1.5 hour round-trip, approx 50 miles, local train ride to Hirosaki. Short taxi transfers to the castle and back. Walking approx. 5 miles through the castle, the grounds and the garden, throughout the day. Shoes may need to be removed to visit some of the sights today.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: After breakfast we transfer to Hirosaki by local train. Upon arrival we visit Hirosaki castle. Constructed in 1611, it was the seat of the Tsugaru clan during the Edo period. We take a stroll around the castle grounds, donated and turned into a park in 1895, before heading to lunch.

Lunch: Plated lunch in a local restaurant.

Afternoon: We explore the delightful Fujita Memorial Garden before transferring back to Hirosaki station. We take the train back to Aomori in the mid to late afternoon where you will enjoy a free evening.

Dinner: On your own to enjoy what you like.

Evening: At leisure.

DAY
12
Nebuta Museum Wa Rasse, Mountain scenery
Misawa
B,D
Hoshino Resort Aomoriya

Activity note: Luggage will be sent by overnight courier, to Tokyo, before check-out; be sure to pack overnight belongings in a daypack as we will be without main luggage in Misawa. Coach drive to Misawa, with stops, 50 miles, approx. 2 hours. Walking approximately 2 to 3 miles throughout the day; mostly flat, city sidewalks and roads, some steps.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: Once checked out, we’ll start the day by visiting Aomori’s impressive Nebuta (Festival Float) Museum Wa Rasse. While here, we’ll learn from our Study Leader about Japanese festivals, what some of them mean to the culture and society of Japan, and about the floats. Weather permitting we will take a stroll around the port area of the city.

Lunch: Free to eat what you like on your own.

Afternoon: Transfer via coach to Misawa and our accommodation for the night. We will take a mountainous route and hopefully, on a clear day, we will have views of the impressive Mt Hakkoda, one of Japan's 100 famous mountains. Misawa is home to the Misawa U.S. Air Base, housing three U.S. military services. Your study leader will talk about the presence of the U.S. military in Japan on your journey. We arrive in the mid afternoon at our accommodation, an onsen resort, with a lake in the grounds for those wishing to stretch their legs after the coach journey.

Dinner: In our accommodation.

Evening: Evening at leisure. Be sure to prepare for check-out and transfer in the morning.

DAY
13
Tokyo, Nihonbashi, City of Townspeople, Farewell Dinner
Tokyo
B,D
Hotel Kazusaya

Activity note: Train ride to Tokyo is approx. 400 miles; about 4 hours. Walking up to approximately 3 miles throughout the day; gentle pace, flat city streets, elevators/escalators sometimes available.

Breakfast: Hotel buffet.

Morning: After checking out of the hotel, we take a local train to Hachinohe station where we transfer for the three hour bullet train ride back to Tokyo.

Lunch: Purchase lunch to eat on the train.

Afternoon: After leaving our overnight bags at the hotel, or checking in if the rooms are ready, we set out on a walking exploration of the Nihonbashi district of Tokyo with our Study Leader. Edo, as Tokyo used to be known in the feudal period, was the de facto political and military center of Japan. Nihonbashi was Edo’s heart with the five main highways of Japan terminating here. The remainder of the afternoon will be free for independent exploration and preparations for onwards journeys.

Dinner: We’ll enjoy our celebratory farewell dinner. Share some of your favorite experiences from the program with new Road Scholar friends.

Evening: At leisure. Be sure to prepare for check-out and departures in the morning.

DAY
14
Program Concludes
In Flight
B

Activity note: Hotel check-out by 10:00 a.m. Train transfer to Narita International Airport, approx 1 hour. See your program’s travel details regarding transfers.

Breakfast: Hotel plated meal.

Morning: After checking out of the hotel, we’ll transfer by train to Narita Airport. This concludes our program. If you are returning home, safe travels. If you are staying on independently, have a wonderful time. If you are transferring to another Road Scholar program, detailed instructions are included in your Information Packet for that program. We hope you enjoy Road Scholar learning adventures and look forward to having you on rewarding programs in the future. Please join our Facebook page and share photos of your program. Visit us at www.facebook.com/rsadventures. Best wishes for all your journeys!






Important registration tip:
If you want to attend the live lecture, please do not wait until the last minute to enroll.
If you enroll after a lecture is complete, we’ll send you a recording of the event.