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1088
Arizona

On the Road: Sedona's Red Rock Country and the Grand Canyon

Set out on a larger-than-life learning adventure to experience Sedona’s Red Rocks and the Grand Canyon, joining experts for an insider’s view on these two monumental sites!
Rating (4.95)
Program No. 1088RJ
Length
7 days
Starts at
1,499
Arizona

On the Road: Sedona's Red Rock Country and the Grand Canyon

Set out on a larger-than-life learning adventure to experience Sedona’s Red Rocks and the Grand Canyon, joining experts for an insider’s view on these two monumental sites!
Length
7 days
Starts at
1,499
Program No. 1088 RJ
Prefer to enroll or inquire by phone? 800-454-5768
climate
Plan ahead.
What kind of weather can you expect? Take a look!
Select your type of room
Price will update based on selection
Prices displayed below are based on per person,doubleoccupancy.
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
May 9 - May 15, 2021
Starting at
1,549
Sep 27 - Oct 3, 2021
Starting at
1,549
Oct 11 - Oct 17, 2021
Starting at
1,549
Nov 7 - Nov 13, 2021
Starting at
1,499
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
May 9 - May 15, 2021
Starting at
1,899
Sep 27 - Oct 3, 2021
Starting at
1,899
Oct 11 - Oct 17, 2021
Starting at
1,899
Nov 7 - Nov 13, 2021
Starting at
1,849

At a Glance

The Colorado Plateau in Arizona claims two of North America’s most beautiful canyons. Explore the geology, ecology and human heritage of these spectacular canyon landscapes: Sedona’s Oak Creek Canyon and the incomparable Grand Canyon. In Sedona, enjoy a spectacular “Pink” Jeep trip into its stunning red-rock back country, exploring vistas seldom seen by visitors. Overnight in Grand Canyon National Park while soaking in the breathtaking panorama of this world heritage site. Travel an epic road to the bottom of the Grand Canyon, through its multiplicity of layered rock and time, with the reward of a picnic on the banks of the mighty Colorado River.
Activity Level
Keep the Pace
Walking up to one mile on varied terrain. Some time for personal hiking at Grand Canyon. Bumpy jeep and van rides on slick rock, dirt and gravel roads. Elevations up to 7,000 feet.
Small Group
Small Group
Love to learn and explore in a small-group setting? These adventures offer small, personal experiences with groups of 10 to 24 participants.

Best of all, you'll ...

  • Visit Montezuma Castle National Monument, a five-story cliff dwelling of the prehistoric Sinagua people.
  • Go off-the-beaten path on the Hualapai Indian Reservation on old Route 66, in western Grand Canyon.
  • At Grand Canyon National Park, explore the South Rim’s dramatic viewpoints and trails with regional experts.
Featured Expert
All Experts
Profile Image
Stanley S. Beus
From his early days growing up on a dairy farm in Idaho, Dr. Stanley Beus quickly became fascinated with nature. He earned a Ph.D. in geology from UCLA before beginning a career as an exploration geologist, and later became the first head of the Geology Department at Northern Arizona University. Dr. Beus has been both a field and class instructor for Road Scholar programs for over 20 years, and has enjoyed bringing geology to life for literally thousands of participants.

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

Profile Image of Ken Mikell
Ken Mikell View biography
Ken Mikell is part of a music duo with his wife, Lynn. They play a wide range of traditional music, with particular attention to the Celtic roots of cowboy music. Using harp, guitar, recorder, fiddle and harmonica, they animate and illuminate the music that followed the trail west. From old time trail songs to the golden era of the radio and silver screen cowboy, they have an extensive knowledge of the history of Western music and enjoy sharing it with audiences.
Profile Image of Paul Johnson
Paul Johnson View biography
Paul Johnson is a recent transplant to Sedona after retiring from a career as a CEO of a non-profit focused on community development. He is a lifelong student of history and has traveled extensively in the US, Europe, Mexico, and elsewhere. Paul loves to share the history and culture of his adopted State of Arizona and enjoys hiking with his wife and dog, playing golf and exploring the wonderful red rock paradise of Sedona.
Profile Image of Carrie Calisay Cannon
Carrie Calisay Cannon View biography
Carrie Calisay Cannon is a member of the Kiowa tribe of Oklahoma and also is of Oglala Lakota descent. She has a B.S. in Wildlife Biology and an M.S. in Resource Management. She is currently employed as an Ethnobotanist for the Hualapai Department of Cultural Resources. She administers a number of department projects and programs which promote the intergenerational teaching of Hualapai ethnobotanical knowledge. She works towards ensuring tribal ethnobotanical knowledge persists as a living practice and tradition.
Profile Image of Stanley Beus
Stanley S. Beus View biography
From his early days growing up on a dairy farm in Idaho, Dr. Stanley Beus quickly became fascinated with nature. He earned a Ph.D. in geology from UCLA before beginning a career as an exploration geologist, and later became the first head of the Geology Department at Northern Arizona University. Dr. Beus has been both a field and class instructor for Road Scholar programs for over 20 years, and has enjoyed bringing geology to life for literally thousands of participants.
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Ancient Peoples of the American Southwest
by Steve Plog
The American Southwest is home to some of the most remarkable monuments of America's prehistoric past, such as Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde. Stephen Plog, who has spent decades working in the region, provides the most readable and up-to-date account of the predecessors of the modern Hopi and Pueblo Indian cultures in this well-received account. Chaco Canyon became the center of a thriving Anasazi cultural tradition. It was the hub of a trading network extending over hundreds of miles, whose arteries were a series of extraordinary roads that are still being discovered and mapped. Interweaving the latest archaeological evidence with early first-person accounts, Professor Plog explains the rise and mysterious fall of Southwestern cultures. 224pp.
Carving Grand Canyon: Evidence, Theories, and Mystery
by Ranney, Wayne
Ranney explains how rivers in general can physically carve canyons, looks chronologically at the numerous theories that have been presented by successive generations of geologists regarding the Grand Canyon's formation, and describes a plausible sequence of geologic events that could create such a landscape. Numerous color photographs, detailed illustrations, and maps are provided. Annotation ©2005 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR 160pp; 2nd edition 2012.
Grand Canyon Geology
by Beus, Stanley
This second edition of the leading book on Grand Canyon geology contains the most recent discoveries and interpretations of the origin and history of the canyon. It includes two entirely new chapters: one on debris flow in the Canyon and one on the impact of water flow releases from the Glen Canyon Dam. All chapters have been updated where necessary and all photographs have been replaced or re-screened for better resolution. Written by acknowledged experts in stratigraphy, paleontology, structural geology, geomorphology, volcanism and seismology, this book offers a wealth of information for geologists and general readers interested in acquiring an understanding of the geological history of this great natural wonder. 423pp
We are an Indian Nation: A History of the Hualapai People (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies)
by Shepherd, Jeffrey P.
This book focuses on the historical construction of the Hualapai Nation in the face of modern American colonialism. Shepherd shows that Hualapai nation-building was a complex process shaped by band identities, competing visions of the past, creative reactions to modernity, and resistance to state power. He analyzes how the Hualapais transformed an externally imposed tribal identity through nationalist discourses of protecting aboriginal territory; and he examines how that discourse strengthened the Hualapais’ claim to land and water while simultaneously reifying a politicized version of their own history. Drawing on recent work in American Indian history and Native American studies, Shepherd shows how the Hualapai have strived to reclaim a distinct identity and culture in the face of ongoing colonialism.
Sedona through time: Geology of the Red Rocks
by Ranney, Wayne
Visitors to the towering red rock cliffs near Sedona seldom realize that the area was once a broad river floodplain that lay beyond the Ancestral Rocky Mountains. Or that this same place was later buried in a vast, Sahara-like desert, still later to lie beneath the waters of a warm tropical sea filled with ancient life forms. Sedona Through Time is an eminently readable story of the evolution of this fantastic landscape through the eons of geologic time.
Field Guide to the Grand Canyon
by Whitney, Stephen R
This book describes and illustrates the area's plants and animals, and offers fascinating in-depth information on the natural history and geology of this dramatic region. 272pp
Secret Sedona: Sacred Moments in the Landscape
by Larry Lindahl
This book provides an overview of the terrain, ancestral Indian ruins and petroglyphs found in Sedona's wilderness areas. Extraordinary photography from one of the nations most photogenic areas. 80 pages.
Living at the Edge: Explorers, Exploiters, and Settlers of the Grand Canyon Region
by Anderson, Michael F
A comprehensive look at the pioneer history of the Grand Canyon Region, from its earliest residents to the creation of the national park at the end of the pioneer era (circa 1920). Included are close to two hundred historic photographs, many never published before, and 12 custom maps of the region. 184pp
The Archaeology of Ancient Arizona
by Jefferson Reid and Stephanie Whittlesey
General overview of the archaeology of Arizona written by archaeologists with combined experience of over half a century of a combination of laboratory and fieldwork.
An Introduction to Grand Canyon Prehistory
by Coder, Christopher M.
People have inhabited Grand Canyon for the past twelve thousand years. Evidence of their lives exists throughout the canyon; but it is up to their ancestors and archaeologists to interpret those remains for us. This book provides a popular look at the architecture, art, and tools of prehistoric Puebloan peoples, as well as information about modern-day Native American tribes. With illustrations and color photographs.
Meals
16 Meals
6 Breakfasts
4 Lunches
6 Dinners
The following choices may be available when requested in advance: Vegetarian, Gluten Free
Lodging
Lodgings may differ by date. Select a date to see the lodgings specific to that date.
Display
Nov 07, 2021 - Nov 13, 2021 (Sedona, AZ to Departures)
  • May 09, 2021 - May 15, 2021 (Sedona, AZ to Departures)
  • Sep 27, 2021 - Oct 03, 2021 (Sedona, AZ to Departures)
  • Oct 11, 2021 - Oct 17, 2021 (Sedona, AZ to Departures)
  • Nov 07, 2021 - Nov 13, 2021 (Sedona, AZ to Departures)
3 nights
Sedona
This centrally located hotel, just 3 miles from “Uptown” Sedona, offers access to many of the amenities that make Sedona such a magical place – hiking trails, art galleries, restaurants, and red rock views. Discover the comfort and convenience of the Andante Inn Sedona.
1 night
Grand Canyon
At Yavapai Lodge®, natural beauty meets the magic of convenience. Set within the incredible scenery of the park, this Grand Canyon hotel occupies a prime location in the canyon. It's about a one-mile walk from the canyon's South Rim and steps from the general store, bank and post office. Of course, it's more than just the perfect place to start your adventure. Its newly-remodeled main lodge makes it a great place to relax and recharge, thanks to cozy seating areas and an outdoor patio. The park’s free shuttle-bus service has a stop directly in front of the lodge that provides access to park viewpoints, Grand Canyon Village and Visitor Center. Rooms in Yavapai West are located in 10, single-story Mid-Century Modern buildings from the heyday of Route 66. These rooms are built on a single story, and contain a ceiling fan to help keep you cool.
2 nights
Peach Springs
Grand Canyon Caverns' Inn is a fun and funky historic Route 66 motel. It has a landscaped "backyard" area with shaded patio and convenience market adjacent to lobby. Grand Canyon Caverns, the largest dry caverns in the United States, is part of the same 800 acre property located in the midst of true Arizona ranch land. The complex also has a restaurant and gift shop. Several miles of developed walking trails wind through the property with both flat and hilly terrain on mixed grassland and woodland at 5500' elevation. The Inn is set back from the highway and provides a safe environment for families. More information at gccaverns.com.
3 nights
Sedona
This centrally located hotel, just 3 miles from “Uptown” Sedona, offers access to many of the amenities that make Sedona such a magical place – hiking trails, art galleries, restaurants, and red rock views. Discover the comfort and convenience of the Andante Inn Sedona.
1 night
Grand Canyon
At Yavapai Lodge®, natural beauty meets the magic of convenience. Set within the incredible scenery of the park, this Grand Canyon hotel occupies a prime location in the canyon. It's about a one-mile walk from the canyon's South Rim and steps from the general store, bank and post office. Of course, it's more than just the perfect place to start your adventure. Its newly-remodeled main lodge makes it a great place to relax and recharge, thanks to cozy seating areas and an outdoor patio. The park’s free shuttle-bus service has a stop directly in front of the lodge that provides access to park viewpoints, Grand Canyon Village and Visitor Center. Rooms in Yavapai West are located in 10, single-story Mid-Century Modern buildings from the heyday of Route 66. These rooms are built on a single story, and contain a ceiling fan to help keep you cool.
2 nights
Peach Springs
Grand Canyon Caverns' Inn is a fun and funky historic Route 66 motel. It has a landscaped "backyard" area with shaded patio and convenience market adjacent to lobby. Grand Canyon Caverns, the largest dry caverns in the United States, is part of the same 800 acre property located in the midst of true Arizona ranch land. The complex also has a restaurant and gift shop. Several miles of developed walking trails wind through the property with both flat and hilly terrain on mixed grassland and woodland at 5500' elevation. The Inn is set back from the highway and provides a safe environment for families. More information at gccaverns.com.
3 nights
Sedona
This centrally located hotel, just 3 miles from “Uptown” Sedona, offers access to many of the amenities that make Sedona such a magical place – hiking trails, art galleries, restaurants, and red rock views. Discover the comfort and convenience of the Andante Inn Sedona.
1 night
Grand Canyon
At Yavapai Lodge®, natural beauty meets the magic of convenience. Set within the incredible scenery of the park, this Grand Canyon hotel occupies a prime location in the canyon. It's about a one-mile walk from the canyon's South Rim and steps from the general store, bank and post office. Of course, it's more than just the perfect place to start your adventure. Its newly-remodeled main lodge makes it a great place to relax and recharge, thanks to cozy seating areas and an outdoor patio. The park’s free shuttle-bus service has a stop directly in front of the lodge that provides access to park viewpoints, Grand Canyon Village and Visitor Center. Rooms in Yavapai West are located in 10, single-story Mid-Century Modern buildings from the heyday of Route 66. These rooms are built on a single story, and contain a ceiling fan to help keep you cool.
2 nights
Peach Springs
Grand Canyon Caverns' Inn is a fun and funky historic Route 66 motel. It has a landscaped "backyard" area with shaded patio and convenience market adjacent to lobby. Grand Canyon Caverns, the largest dry caverns in the United States, is part of the same 800 acre property located in the midst of true Arizona ranch land. The complex also has a restaurant and gift shop. Several miles of developed walking trails wind through the property with both flat and hilly terrain on mixed grassland and woodland at 5500' elevation. The Inn is set back from the highway and provides a safe environment for families. More information at gccaverns.com.
3 nights
Sedona
This centrally located hotel, just 3 miles from “Uptown” Sedona, offers access to many of the amenities that make Sedona such a magical place – hiking trails, art galleries, restaurants, and red rock views. Discover the comfort and convenience of the Andante Inn Sedona.
1 night
Grand Canyon
At Yavapai Lodge®, natural beauty meets the magic of convenience. Set within the incredible scenery of the park, this Grand Canyon hotel occupies a prime location in the canyon. It's about a one-mile walk from the canyon's South Rim and steps from the general store, bank and post office. Of course, it's more than just the perfect place to start your adventure. Its newly-remodeled main lodge makes it a great place to relax and recharge, thanks to cozy seating areas and an outdoor patio. The park’s free shuttle-bus service has a stop directly in front of the lodge that provides access to park viewpoints, Grand Canyon Village and Visitor Center. Rooms in Yavapai West are located in 10, single-story Mid-Century Modern buildings from the heyday of Route 66. These rooms are built on a single story, and contain a ceiling fan to help keep you cool.
2 nights
Peach Springs
Grand Canyon Caverns' Inn is a fun and funky historic Route 66 motel. It has a landscaped "backyard" area with shaded patio and convenience market adjacent to lobby. Grand Canyon Caverns, the largest dry caverns in the United States, is part of the same 800 acre property located in the midst of true Arizona ranch land. The complex also has a restaurant and gift shop. Several miles of developed walking trails wind through the property with both flat and hilly terrain on mixed grassland and woodland at 5500' elevation. The Inn is set back from the highway and provides a safe environment for families. More information at gccaverns.com.





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