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With over 355 miles of trails, Rocky Mountain National Park is known as a must-explore for hikers. So lace up your boots and get ready to learn a lot — this one is not to be missed!
Rating (5)
Program No. 4819RJ
Length
6 days
Starts at
1,549
Colorado

Hiking Rocky Mountain National Park

With over 355 miles of trails, Rocky Mountain National Park is known as a must-explore for hikers. So lace up your boots and get ready to learn a lot — this one is not to be missed!
Length
6 days
Starts at
1,549
Program No. 4819 RJ
Prefer to enroll or inquire by phone? 800-454-5768
climate
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Prices displayed below are based on per person,doubleoccupancy.
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Jun 20 - Jun 25, 2021
Starting at
1,549
Jul 5 - Jul 10, 2021
Starting at
1,549
Aug 29 - Sep 3, 2021
Starting at
1,549
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Jun 20 - Jun 25, 2021
Starting at
2,039
Jul 5 - Jul 10, 2021
Starting at
2,039
Aug 29 - Sep 3, 2021
Starting at
2,039

At a Glance

Experience a hiking adventure in Rocky Mountain National Park, home to emerald-tinted lakes and thick forests of the Continental Divide. Led by naturalists, hike the area's unique ecosystems and the heart of the National Park as you observe wildlife and majestic scenery. Travel past glistening streams and waterfalls and above the forests to a landscape opening to the barren moonscape of Mills Lake and the fragile treeless tundra of the Longs Peak massif. A special treat is a drive over Trail Ridge Road, America's highest continuous road at 12,100 feet, where herds of elk graze along the roadside.
Activity Level
Outdoor: Challenging
Daily hikes of 6-12 miles over varied terrain. Elevations of 8,000-13,000 feet.
Small Group
Small Group
Love to learn and explore in a small-group setting? These adventures offer small, personal experiences with groups of 10 to 24 participants.

Best of all, you'll ...

  • Discover Rocky Mountain National Park’s pristine and less-traveled southern portion known as Wild Basin.
  • Hike the headwaters of the Big Thompson River to Cub Lake and the amazing alpine glacial valleys Glacier Gorge and Loch Vale.
  • Explore areas where elk, coyotes, deer, snowshoe hares and many other mammals inhabit year round.

General Notes

For a women-only version of this program, see "Hiking Rocky Mountain National Park for Women" (#17551). Due to the nature of this program, listening devices are not available.
Featured Expert
All Experts
Profile Image
Peter McCarville
Peter McCarville is a consulting geologist, geological instructor and educator who has lived in Colorado on the western slope since 1995. He also works as an instructor and program designer for Mountains and Plains Institute (MPILLS), leading hiking and skiing excursions, while making cameo appearances as a geology expert on other programs. He has a wonderful ability to convey complex natural history in layman's terms.

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

Profile Image of Len Ewy
Len Ewy retired recently after 31 years as a captain in the Fort Collins Fire Department. He served in many roles including training officer and public outreach. For the last three years, Len has served as a seasonal interpretive guide for the city of Fort Collins natural areas, interpreting geology, ecology, and cultural history for many visitors. He has written articles published in regional and national publications with an emphasis on combining science with personal observations to create stories that can be of interest and appreciated by the general public. Len has further volunteered in Rocky Mountain National Park and has extensively hiked and backpacked in the Park and the Rockies.
Profile Image of Peter McCarville
Peter McCarville View biography
Peter McCarville is a consulting geologist, geological instructor and educator who has lived in Colorado on the western slope since 1995. He also works as an instructor and program designer for Mountains and Plains Institute (MPILLS), leading hiking and skiing excursions, while making cameo appearances as a geology expert on other programs. He has a wonderful ability to convey complex natural history in layman's terms.
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Rocky Mountain National Park: The Complete Hiking Guide
by Lisa Foster
The complete experience of hiking Rocky Mountain National Park has finally been captured in one comprehensive volume. All 400 named features in the Park are explored and two-thirds of this book covers off-trail hikes not commonly found in guidebooks. Extensively field-checked and accompanied by striking photography and USGS maps, this amazing collection draws upon Foster's over 7,000 hours of backcountry expertise. From casual strolls to class 4 climbing, no other book has tackled the entire park in such an in-depth and exciting way.
Recollections of a Rocky Mountain Ranger
by Jack Moomaw
From about 1920 to 1945 Jack Moomaw rangered at Rocky Mountain National Park. This is a collection of short stories of the unusual or outstanding events that occurred during his tenure as a ranger. There are quaint stories of colorful people he met or knew, and stories of rescues and tragedies. Jack was an extremely hardy soul; he loved winter patrols and survived in cold weather that sent others to the hospital. He dabbled in archaeology and was a huge chauvinist. Stories are short (just a few pages) and interesting. This is a fun read.
A Lady's Life in the Rocky Mountains
by Isabella Bird
In 1872, Isabella Bird, daughter of a clergyman, set off alone to the Antipodes 'in search of health' and found she had embarked on a life of adventurous travel. In 1873, wearing Hawaiian riding dress, she rode her horse through the American Wild West, a terrain only newly opened to pioneer settlement. The letters that make up this volume were first published in 1879. They tell of magnificent, unspoiled landscapes and abundant wildlife, of encounters with rattlesnakes, wolves, pumas and grizzly bears, and her reactions to the volatile passions of the miners and pioneer settlers. A classic account of a truly astounding journey.
Geology Underfoot along Colorado's Front Range
by Lon Abbott and Terri Cook
The transition from the relatively flat Great Plains to the craggy peaks of Colorado s Front Range is one of North America s most abrupt topographical contrasts. The epic, 1,800-million-year geologic story behind this amazing landscape is even more awe inspiring. In Geology Underfoot along Colorado s Front Range, the most recent addition to the Geology Underfoot series, authors (and geoscientists) Lon Abbott and Terri Cook narrate the Front Range s tale, from its humble beginnings as a flat, nondescript seafloor through several ghostly incarnations as a towering mountain range. The book s 21 chapters, or vignettes, lead you to easily accessible stops along the Front Range s highways and byways, where you ll meet the apatosaur and other dinosaurs who roamed the floodplains and beaches that once covered the Front Range; look for diamonds in rare, out-of-the-way volcanic pipes; learn how America s mountain, Pikes Peak, developed from molten magma miles below the surface only to become an important visual landmark for early Great Plains travelers; and walk the Gangplank, a singularly important plateau for both nineteenth-century westward expansion and our understanding of the Front Range s most recent exhumation. A healthy dose of full-color illustrations and photos demystify the concepts put forth in the authors elegant, insightful prose. With Geology Underfoot along Colorado s Front Range in hand, you ll feel like you re traveling through time as you explore the Front Range s hidden geologic treasures.





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