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24227
Online Program

Adventures Online: Industry in Cleveland, Detroit & Pittsburgh

Learn how iron and steel powered America’s Industrial Revolution in Detroit, Pittsburgh and Cleveland during this live, online learning adventure!
New
Program No. 24227RJ
Length
4 days
Starts at
399
Online Program

Adventures Online: Industry in Cleveland, Detroit & Pittsburgh

Learn how iron and steel powered America’s Industrial Revolution in Detroit, Pittsburgh and Cleveland during this live, online learning adventure!
Length
4 days
Starts at
399
Program No. 24227 RJ
Prefer to enroll or inquire by phone? 800-454-5768
Select your number of enrollees
Price will update based on selection
Prices displayed below are based on per person

DATES & PRICES

Online Program
Details
Accommodation Details
Learn from the comfort of your own home.

DATES & PRICES

Online Program
Details
Accommodation Details
Learn from the comfort of your own home.

At a Glance

Iron and steel were mainstays of American industry that shaped the cities of Cleveland, Detroit and Pittsburgh into what they are today. Immerse yourself in the history of America’s Industrial Revolution during this four-day, online learning adventure! Get an in-depth look at the steel industry in Pittsburgh and learn how Cleveland and Detroit were shaped by industrial growth in the late 1800’s. Consider the impact of immigrants on each city and learn about the traditions, foods and communities that they introduced. Get to know your fellow Road Scholars as you take in insightful presentations and lectures from local historians, and marvel at the stories from this iconic time in American history.

Best of all, you’ll…

  • Learn how the Industrial Revolution impacted Detroit and gave life to the famed American auto industry.
  • Get insight into how immigrants shaped the iron and steel industries in Pittsburgh, and enjoy a virtual field trip to Carrie Blast Furnaces National Historic Landmark to learn about iron-making technology and the factory’s workers.
  • Trace the impact of industry and immigration on the development of Cleveland and learn the history of Millionaire’s Row, home to 130 mansions that belonged to industry giants.

General Notes

You’ll enjoy 2-3 hours of daily instruction, discussion and/or field trips, which includes sufficient breaks throughout the program. Please review the daily itinerary for start and end times to ensure you won’t miss a minute of this live experience. This online program is through Zoom, an easy-to-use web video service that includes closed captioning. All you need is an Internet connection and your computer. We’ll provide a how-to guide to make sure you’ll have a hassle-free experience. This session is offered live only and will not be available on demand.
Featured Expert
All Experts
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Chad Malkamaki
Chad Malkamaki is the public programs manager at the Western Reserve Historical Society. Chad joined WRHS in 2001 as a museum educator and has led and developed programs that are inquiry-based, hands-on, and correlate to the current Ohio Academic Content Standards. For the past three years Chad has worked with Roads Scholar providing lectures on the history of Cleveland and walking excursions of downtown architecture and history. Chad attended Bowling Green State University studying secondary education with minors in history and political science.

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

Profile Image of Chad Malkamaki
Chad Malkamaki View biography
Chad Malkamaki is the public programs manager at the Western Reserve Historical Society. Chad joined WRHS in 2001 as a museum educator and has led and developed programs that are inquiry-based, hands-on, and correlate to the current Ohio Academic Content Standards. For the past three years Chad has worked with Roads Scholar providing lectures on the history of Cleveland and walking excursions of downtown architecture and history. Chad attended Bowling Green State University studying secondary education with minors in history and political science.
Profile Image of Lynde Vespoli
Lynde Vespoli View biography
Lynde Vespoli was born in Cleveland and raised in Chicago. She and her husband raised their children in Cincinnati, Chile, and Cleveland before moving to Minneapolis. Lynde earned a degree in urban and regional planning and has certificates in travel & tourism as well as event & meeting planning. She has worked with Road Scholar since 2012 and has lead programs in the United States, Canada, and Cuba. When not working, Lynde and her husband enjoy traveling, competing in curling tournaments, and spoiling their granddaughters.
Profile Image of Robin Boyle
Robin Boyle View biography
Robin Boyle is a Professor of Urban Planning at Wayne State University, and has served as chair of the Geography and Urban Planning Department, and as Associate Dean. Born and educated in Scotland, Robin worked as a visiting professor at several international schools including the Melbourne School of Design in Australia. For more than 30 years, Professor Boyle was also a member of the UK Royal Town Planning Institute. Recently, he completed a study of surface transportation options between Detroit Metro airport and downtown.
Profile Image of Ron Baraff
Ron Baraff View biography
Ron Baraff, a Pittsburgh native, has served as Director of Historic Resources and Facilities for Rivers of Steel since 1998. He supervises Rivers of Steel’s preservation and historic interpretation efforts, oversees its museum and archives programs, unique preservation projects, and heritage sites including the Carrie Blast Furnaces National Historic Landmark in Rankin and Swissvale, the historic Pump House in Munhall, the Bost Building National Historic Landmark in Homestead, and the W.A. Young & Sons Foundry and Machine Shop in Rices Landing, a National Historic Landmark.
Profile Image of Brianna Horan
Brianna Horan View biography
Brianna Horan is Manager of Visitor Experience at Rivers of Steel. A Pittsburgh native, she loves the city’s spirit of reinvention and connection to its roots. Brianna enjoys exploring the city’s woods and neighborhoods, learning about the region’s people and stories. She is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, where she studied Political Science and Journalism with a minor in French. Her experience includes seven years as a manager at the Fairmont Pittsburgh hotel and more than ten years as a freelance features writer-editor.
Profile Image of Chris McGinnis
Chris McGinnis View biography
Chris McGinnis is co-founder and Chief Curator of Rivers of Steel Arts, a community art program based in the Carrie Furnaces National Historic Landmark. An artist, curator, and educator, he has exhibited extensively nationally and internationally. Chris has created projects for the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, SPACE Pittsburgh, Urban Institute of Contemporary Art, the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, and The Rivers of Steel Heritage Corporation. His art and writing have been published in Sculpture Magazine, ArtSlant, the National Studio Visit Magazine, and more.
Profile Image of Susie Toman
Susie Toman View biography
Susie Toman joined Rivers of Steel as an educator for student programs. She led public groups at the Carrie Blast Furnaces and on the Explorer riverboat, also helping to develop programs for audiences of all ages. With a background in environmental science, biology, and a degree from Slippery Rock University, she spent much of her career spent in the public realm. She served as a Park Ranger and Resource Manager for the Army Corps of Engineers and as Executive Director for the Kiski Valley YMCA.
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Steel: Worker Diary of a Furnace Worker
by Charles Rumford Walker
"In the summer of 1919, a few weeks before the Great Steel Strike, I bought some second-hand clothes and went to work on an open-hearth furnace near Pittsburgh to learn the steel business. I was a graduate of Yale, and a few weeks before had resigned a commission as first-lieutenant in the regular army...In these chapters I have put down what I saw, felt, and thought as a steel-worker in 1919." --from the Foreward
Pittsburgh: The Story of an American City
by Stefan Lorant
Pittsburgh: The Story of an American City follows Pittsburgh from its frontier beginnings through its evolution into the most heavily industrialized city in the world, to the city's renewal of itself as "America's Most Livable City." This beautiful volume though, is much more than the story of a single city; it is the history of the United States. This book is based on years of research and includes contributions by such noted American historians as Henry Steele Commager and Oscar Handlin. More than 1100 pictures recreate the city's dramatic 200+year history. Featured are photographs by W. Eugene Smith, Margaret Bourke-White, Norman W. Schumm, Lorant himself and others. A chronology of events from 1717 offers historical snapshots in the day to day life of the archetypical American city.
Remaking the Rust Belt: The Postindustrial Transformation of North America
by Tracy Neumann
Cities in the North Atlantic coal and steel belt embodied industrial power in the early twentieth century, but by the 1970s, their economic and political might had been significantly diminished by newly industrializing regions in the Global South. This was not simply a North American phenomenon—the precipitous decline of mature steel centers like Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Hamilton, Ontario, was a bellwether for similar cities around the world. Contemporary narratives of the decline of basic industry on both sides of the Atlantic make the postindustrial transformation of old manufacturing centers seem inevitable, the product of natural business cycles and neutral market forces. In Remaking the Rust Belt, Tracy Neumann tells a different story, one in which local political and business elites, drawing on a limited set of internationally circulating redevelopment models, pursued postindustrial urban visions. They hired the same consulting firms; shared ideas about urban revitalization on study tours, at conferences, and in the pages of professional journals; and began to plan cities oriented around services rather than manufacturing—all well in advance of the economic malaise of the 1970s. While postindustrialism remade cities, it came with high costs. In following this strategy, public officials sacrificed the well-being of large portions of their populations. Remaking the Rust Belt recounts how local leaders throughout the Rust Belt created the jobs, services, leisure activities, and cultural institutions that they believed would attract younger, educated, middle-class professionals. In the process, they abandoned social democratic goals and widened and deepened economic inequality among urban residents.
The People's Tycoon: Henry Ford and the American Century
by Steven Watts
The real Henry Ford was a tangle of contradictions. He set off the consumer revolution by producing a car affordable to the masses, all the while lamenting the moral toll exacted by consumerism. He believed in giving his workers a living wage, though he was entirely opposed to union labor. He had a warm and loving relationship with his wife, but sired a son with another woman. A rabid anti-Semite, he nonetheless embraced African American workers in the era of Jim Crow. Uncovering the man behind the myth, situating his achievements and their attendant controversies firmly within the context of early 20th century America, Watts has given us a comprehensive, illuminating, and fascinating biography of one of America’s first mass-culture celebrities.
Cleveland: A Concise History
by Carol Poh Miller & Robert Wheeler
This highly successful short history of Cleveland has now been revised and brought up to date through 1996, the bicentennial year, including two new chapters, and new illustrations and charts.
Driving Detroit: The Quest for Respect in the Motor City
by George Galster
For most of the twentieth century, Detroit was a symbol of American industrial might, a place of entrepreneurial and technical ingenuity where the latest consumer inventions were made available to everyone through the genius of mass production. Today, Detroit is better known for its dwindling population, moribund automobile industry, and alarmingly high murder rate. In Driving Detroit, author George Galster, a fifth-generation Detroiter and internationally known urbanist, sets out to understand how the city has come to represent both the best and worst of what cities can be, all within the span of a half century. Galster invites the reader to travel with him along the streets and into the soul of this place to grasp fully what drives the Motor City. With a scholar's rigor and a local's perspective, Galster uncovers why metropolitan Detroit's cultural, commercial, and built landscape has been so radically transformed. He shows how geography, local government structure, and social forces created a housing development system that produced sprawl at the fringe and abandonment at the core. Galster argues that this system, in tandem with the region's automotive economic base, has chronically frustrated the population's quest for basic physical, social, and psychological resources. These frustrations, in turn, generated numerous adaptations—distrust, scapegoating, identity politics, segregation, unionization, and jurisdictional fragmentation—that collectively leave Detroit in an uncompetitive and unsustainable position. Partly a self-portrait, in which Detroiters paint their own stories through songs, poems, and oral histories, Driving Detroit offers an intimate, insightful, and perhaps controversial explanation for the stunning contrasts—poverty and plenty, decay and splendor, despair and resilience—that characterize the once mighty city.





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