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Japan

Awesome Asia: The Best of Japan With Your Family

Program No. 23480RJ
Japan is a country filled with contrasts—from lively cities to quiet temples. Alongside your family, explore the best of Japan on an awesome learning adventure from Tokyo to Hiroshima.
Length
14 days
Rating
New
Activity Level
Starts at
5,999 / ADULT
4,749 / CHILD
Flights start at
1,725

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Age 10 - 18
ROOMING OPTION PRICING
The figures below indicate the rooming options available.
DATES
Jun 14 - Jun 27, 2023
Per Adult
5,999
Per Child
4,749
Select
Jun 14 - Jun 27, 2023
-
5,999
/ Adult
4,749
/ Child
6,499
/ Adult
4,749
/ Child
SOLD OUT
Jun 28 - Jul 11, 2023
Per Adult
5,999
Per Child
4,749
Select
Jun 28 - Jul 11, 2023
-
5,999
/ Adult
4,749
/ Child
6,499
/ Adult
4,749
/ Child
Limited Space

At a Glance

As soon as you and your family step off the plane in Japan, you will realize you are stepping into a world completely unlike your own. The bright lights of Tokyo and the thriving city life are sure to be the first things that catch your eye, but just a short journey away are serene temples offering a welcome from a giant, smiling Buddha. Alongside your family, discover a country full of surprises from ninjas and Zen gardens to castles and shrines. Learn about the facets of Japanese culture that are so different from our own, such as how to become a geisha. Discuss the atomic bombs that were dropped on Japan to end WWII and what it means today. Join local experts on this exciting two-week Asian learning adventure.
Activity Level
Keep the Pace
Small Group
Small Group
Love to learn and explore in a small-group setting? These adventures offer small, personal experiences with groups of 13 to 24 participants.

Best of all, you’ll…

  • Stroll through shrines surrounded by forest and venture to temples that are unlike anything you have ever seen, as you learn how important they are to the locals.
  • Explore one of the best-preserved castles in Japan and learn how it was built to fend off invaders.
  • Get a real taste of Japanese life during a sushi-making class and in a fun manga drawing class.
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Super Sushi Ramen Express: A Culinary Adventure Through Japan
by Michael Booth
A fascinating and funny culinary journey through Japan. Japan is arguably the preeminent food nation on earth; it's a mecca for the world's greatest chefs and has more Michelin stars than any other country. The Japanese go to extraordinary lengths and expense to eat food that is marked both by its exquisite preparation and exotic content. Their creativity, dedication, and courage in the face of dishes such as cod sperm and octopus ice cream are only now beginning to be fully appreciated in the sushi- and ramen-saturated West, as are the remarkable health benefits of the traditional Japanese diet.
Diary of a Tokyo Teen: A Japanese-American Girl Travels to the Land of Trendy Fashion, High-Tech Toilets and Maid Cafes
by Christine Mari Inzer
A book for comic lovers and Japanophiles of all ages, Diary of a Tokyo Teen presents a unique look at modern-day Japan through a young woman's eyes.
Culture Smart! Japan
by Paul Norbury
A quick guide to the customs and etiquette of Japan.
Kitchen
by Banana Yoshimoto
The first novel of one of Japan's contemporary literary stars to be translated in to English.
Japan: A Guide of Japan for Teenagers
by Constance Noziere
Upon arrival in Japan, one inevitably undergoes culture shock. The Japanese way of life is so unique that it appears incomprehensible. Foreigners, or "gaijins" as they are commonly referred to, are initially disoriented and mystified. The author has written this travel guide to help teenagers discover Japan and decipher its inhabitants' customs and habits.
A Traveller's History of Japan
by Richard Tames
A history of Japan and its transformation from Shinto, Shogun and Samurai traditions to 20th-century powerhouse.
A Geek in Japan Revised and Expanded: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony
by Hector Garcia
Created specifically for fans of Japanese cool culture, A Geek in Japan is one of the most iconic, hip, and concise cultural guides available. Reinvented for the internet age, it is packed with personal essays and hundreds of photographs and presents all the touchstones of traditional and contemporary culture in an entirely new way.
You Gotta Have Wa
by Robert Whiting
A hilarious, yet informative, account of Japanese baseball and the cultural clashes that ensued when Americans began playing there professionally.
Cool Japan Guide: Fun in the Land of Manga, Lucky Cats and Ramen
by Abby Denson
Traveling to Japan has never been so much fun - visit the land of anime, manga, cosplay, hot springs and sushi! This graphic Japan travel guide is the first of its kind exploring Japanese culture from a cartoonist's perspective.
Rice, Noodle, Fish: Deep Travels Through Japan's Food Culture
by Matt Goulding
An innovative new take on the travel guide, Rice, Noodle, Fish decodes Japan's extraordinary food culture through a mix of in-depth narrative and insider advice, along with 195 color photographs. In this 5000-mile journey through the noodle shops, tempura temples, and teahouses of Japan, Matt Goulding, co-creator of the enormously popular Eat This, Not That! book series, navigates the intersection between food, history, and culture, creating one of the most ambitious and complete books ever written about Japanese culinary culture from the Western perspective.
The Tale of Genji
by Murasaki Shikibu
Completed in the early 11th century, Genji Monogatari is considered a masterpiece of Japanese prose literature, and one of the world's earliest novels. Although its exact origins remain elusive, it is believed that the female author spent many years in service to the royal family of the time.
Hiroshima
by John Hersey
First published in 1946, this recounts the events of August 6, 1945 through the observations of survivors.
The Tales of the Heike
by Burton Watson (translator) & Haruo Shirane (editor)
The Tales of the Heike is one of the most influential works in Japanese literature and culture, remaining even today a crucial source for fiction, drama, and popular media. Originally written in the mid-thirteenth century, it features a cast of vivid characters and chronicles the epic Genpei war, a civil conflict that marked the end of the power of the Heike and changed the course of Japanese history.
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14 days
13 nights
25 meals
11 B 9 L 5 D
DAY
1
Depart USA, In Transit to Program
In Flight

Activity note: Please note that this program is for grandchildren aged 11 - 14.

DAY
2
Arrive Tokyo, Check In
Tokyo
Akasaka Excel Hotel Tokyu

Activity note: Check in from 4:00 p.m.

Afternoon: After checking in to the hotel and getting your room, take some time to freshen up and relax.

Dinner: As many flights from USA are likely to arrive this evening, dinner is at own arrangements tonight. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions.

Evening: Continue getting to know your fellow Road Scholars, settle in, and get a good night’s rest for the day ahead. As we will discuss during our Orientation session tomorrow morning, Tokyo is a vast city. To make the most of our experience, we will do as locals do and use the large, complex, public transit system. You will be provided with pre-loaded debit cards (Pasmo) that will cover all of the included program transportation. This card can be reloaded with additional amounts and can be used for free time in Tokyo and other cities as well. We will also provide instructions on how to download and use the dedicated Road Scholar program “App” to make the most of free time and opportunities for independent exploration.

DAY
3
Asakusa: Understanding Japan, Cooking Class Lunch, Sensoji
Tokyo
B,L,D
Akasaka Excel Hotel Tokyu

Activity note: Travel by public transit; stairs and escalators. Walking up to 5 miles throughout the day and standing. Shoes must be removed multiple times. Sitting on low chairs in tatami room during demonstration.

Breakfast: At the hotel, the breakfast buffet offers a variety of traditional Japanese and Western breakfast items.

Morning: We will walk from the hotel with our Group Leader and take the subway from Ginza to the Asakusa neighborhood. There, we walk to a small local Shinto shrine and gather in a private room. Orientation: The Group Leader will greet everyone and lead introductions. We will review the schedule and any changes, discuss roles and responsibilities, logistics, safety guidelines, emergency procedures, and answer questions. The high-speed Shinkansen “bullet train" we will use to transfer between some cities can reach speeds of nearly 200 miles (320 kilometres) per hour. A number of meals will be on your own to enjoy the cuisine of your choice. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions. Periods in the schedule designated as “Free time” and “At leisure” offer opportunities to do what you like and make your experience even more meaningful and memorable according to your personal preferences. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions. Program activities, schedules, personnel, and indicated distances or times may change due to local circumstances/conditions. In the event of changes, we will alert you as quickly as possible. Thank you for your understanding. After Orientation, we will meet a local resident who will give us a demonstration of ikebana, which illustrates how Shinto beliefs converged with the introduction of Buddhism from China, forming the basis of the Japanese psyche. We will set out and walk through Asakusa, where residents take pride in being “edokko” — people of Edo, the pre-modern name for Japan.

Lunch: Arriving at the workshop home of a local couple, we will participate in a hands on sushi-making class then have what we’ve made for lunch.

Afternoon: After lunch, we will walk down “Kitchen Street” Kappabashi, to see stores for knives, Japanese tableware, and “sampuru” plastic food samples. We will then be met by rickshaws and ride through the streets of Asakusa to Sensoji, the city’s oldest and busiest temple. At Sensoji Temple, we will learn about Buddhism in the daily lives of Japanese people. We will return to the hotel by subway and have the remainder of the afternoon at leisure.

Dinner: We will meet in the lobby and walk from the hotel to a casual Japanese “izakaya” (tavern) for a family-style meal of small plates with a variety of foods and beverage choices of beer, wine, soft drinks, tea.

Evening: Returning to the hotel, the remainder of the evening is at leisure.

DAY
4
Meiji Shrine, Omotesando, Harajuku, Free Time
Tokyo
B,L
Akasaka Excel Hotel Tokyu

Activity note: Travel by public transit; stairs and escalators. Walking up to 5 miles throughout the day and standing.

Breakfast: Hotel buffet.

Morning: We will take the subway to the Meiji Shrine. Dedicated to the late 19th-century emperor Meiji who opened Japan to the West, the shrine is situated in a serene forest oasis. The 40-foot-high torii gate at the entrance is made of 1,500-year-old cypress. From a local expert, we will learn about the history of the shrine and some basics of Shinto — a belief system unique to Japan. Incidentally, you cannot become a Shinto, you must be Japanese and born in Japan. Next, just steps outside of Meiji Shrine, we will move from tradition and into the ultra-modern in Harajuku, the center of Japanese youth culture and fashion, and down Omotesando, the tree-lined “Champs Elysees” of Tokyo, This neighborhood is the location for haute couture brands. Even more impressive than fashion brand names are the stunning, architecturally-ambitious buildings by great modern architects who have been the recipients of more Pritzker Prizes than anywhere else in the world.

Lunch: At a local café in the Harajuku area.

Afternoon: Free time. This block of time has been set aside for your personal independent exploration to see and do what interests you most. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions. The Group Leader will accompany those who wish to return to the hotel via public transportation.

Dinner: This meal has been excluded from the program cost and is on your own to enjoy what you like. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions.

Evening: At leisure.

DAY
5
Edo Open Air Architectural Museum, Nakano
Tokyo
B,L
Akasaka Excel Hotel Tokyu

Activity note: Travel by coach, public transit; stairs and escalators. Walking up to 5 miles throughout the day and standing.

Breakfast: Hotel buffet.

Morning: We travel by motorcoach to the Edo Open Air Architectural Museum where a local expert will lead our exploration. The museum vividly illustrates the capital city from 1624-1643 as shaped by shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543-1616). We will learn how the city was divided by the Edo Castle and the origins of the shogun and leading families. In contrast, we will also examine the daily life of the common people. The Edo period was one of immense transformation that impacted every corner of the island nation.

Lunch: At a local restaurant.

Afternoon: We will drive to the Nakano neighborhood for a walk through the meandering pedestrian streets where small businesses are jumbled with modern pop culture. In a local school, we’ll learn the history of “manga” — a uniquely Japanese art form, then learn how to draw our own in a hands-on activity. We will leave this neighborhood to return to the hotel via subway, breaking our journey en route for a view of the busiest intersection in the world: Shibuya Crossing. Those who wish to do so are welcome to stay out and explore independently.

Dinner: On your own to explore local fare and enjoy what you like.

Evening: At leisure. Prepare for check-out and transfer in the morning.

DAY
6
Shinkansen to Nagoya, Ninja History, Mie Prefecture
Misugi
B,D
Misugi Resort Hotel

Activity note: Early departure. Getting on/off bullet train; the ride to Nagoya is approximately 1.5 hours. Getting on/off a motorcoach; driving to Iga about 60 miles (95 kilometres), approximately 2 hours; driving to Misugi about 30 miles (48 kilometres), approximately 1 hour. Walking approximately 1 mile, standing up to 2 hours; paved and unpaved ground. Shoes must be removed at entrance of rooms in Japanese hotel. Sitting on low chairs for dining; sleeping on Japanese futons on the floor.

Breakfast: This morning your larger luggage item will be sent ahead to Kyoto. Please have your luggage down to reception by 7am. Plan to keep your smaller luggage with you for travel by train. Breakfast boxes will be provided for our early morning departure.

Morning: After checking out of the hotel, we will take taxis to the train station and catch the 7:30 a.m. Shinkansen “bullet” train to Nagoya. Upon arrival at the Nagoya train station, we will board a motorcoach, and drive from Nagoya to Mie Prefecture.

Lunch: On your own to have what you like at a roadside food court.

Afternoon: At a local municipal centre, we will engage in a hands-on activity and learn how to make Iga Kumihimo, braided silk cords combined with silver or gold threads. The craft has a centuries-old history, with skills and designs handed down through many generations. We will make a key ring or bracelet in a choice of colors, to take home. Next we will visit the Ninja Museum of Igaryu. Not just the stuff of action movies, ninja were the secret spy network for shoguns. They employed martial arts, physical prowess, and secret disguises to carry out their missions and evade danger. Iga is the center of historical study of ninja. At the museum, we will learn about their weapons, history, and meet actual ninjas. Even today, their skill is passed on from parent to child, which we will see in an entertaining performance of their skills. Continuing by motorcoach to Misugi, we will check in to our “ryokan” (Japanese hotel), with tatami rooms. If you like, you may change into the provided “yukata” (casual kimono).

Dinner: In the hotel restaurant, we have a buffet dinner.

Evening: At leisure. You might like to use the onsen — the traditional, communal Japanese bath divided into male and female sections. Japanese culture is particular about manners; bath etiquette will be detailed in preparatory materials sent following enrollment. Note: There is a cultural taboo against tattoos. People with tattoos are not permitted in Japanese communal baths.

DAY
7
Traditional Life & Culture in Misugi
Misugi
B,L,D
Misugi Resort Hotel

Breakfast: In the hotel.

Morning: We will drive to the village of Misugi and walk through the town, meeting local people and getting insights into local life. We also learn about the family who owns our hotel, how they grow some of their own produce for use in the restaurant, and even brew their own beer.

Lunch: For lunch, we will have a typical Japanese camping lunch that we will cook ourselves.

Afternoon: After lunch we will have a walk in the local forest. We will then have some free time to enjoy the local on-site onsen before we learn how to make a traditional Japanese cake.

Dinner: In a private tatami room at the hotel, we will have a traditional kaiseki dinner featuring seasonal and regional produce.

Evening: At leisure. Prepare for check-out and transfer tomorrow.

DAY
8
Transfer to Nara, Todaiji Temple, Kyoto
Kyoto
B,L
Kyoto Tokyu Hotel

Activity note: Getting on/off a motorcoach; driving to Nara about 50 miles (75 kilometres), approximately 2 hours; driving from Nara to Kyoto about 30 miles (50 kilometres). Walking approximately 2 miles throughout the day.

Breakfast: In the hotel.

Morning: We will check out of the hotel mid-morning, board the motorcoach with our Group Leader, and drive to Nara.

Lunch: At a local restaurant.

Afternoon: We will transfer to Todaiji Temple, constructed in 752 as the chief temple of all provincial Buddhist temples of Japan. It grew so powerful that the capital was moved from Nara to Nagaoka in 784 in order to lower the temple's influence on government affairs. Todaiji's main hall, the Daibutsuden (Big Buddha Hall), is the world's largest wooden building, despite the fact that the present reconstruction of 1692 is only two thirds of the original temple hall's size. The massive building houses one of Japan's largest bronze statues of the Buddha (Daibutsu), more than 49 feet high. The temple is situated in Nara’s Deer Park. Deer were traditionally perceived to be the messengers of the gods, so were not hunted and developed a tame relationship with humans. Today, the deer roam freely and enthusiastically seek snacks from visitors who can purchase “deer crackers” from local vendors. Moving on to Kyoto, we will check in to our hotel.

Dinner: On your own to have what you like. The area around the hotel provides a multitude of dining options.

Evening: At leisure.

DAY
9
Ginkakuji Temple, Zen Garden, Tea Ceremony
Kyoto
B,L,D
Kyoto Tokyu Hotel

Activity note: Getting on/off a motorcoach. Walking up to 5 miles throughout the day. Taiko drumming is as physical as you wish to make it, and does not require any special clothing or equipment.

Breakfast: Hotel buffet.

Morning: We will be joined by a local expert, board a motorcoach, and ride to the north-west side of Kyoto into the Higashiyama neighborhood. There, we will set out on a walking field trip through the manicured Zen garden of Ginkakuji (silver pavilion) Temple. In temple gardens, the core beliefs of Shinto and Buddhism are modeled in three dimensions. We will follow the path uphill to take in views over the city, then walk along the river path — known as the Philosophers’ Path that was used for contemplation — through local neighborhoods. The taiko, sometimes called wadaiko, is a traditional type of drum native to Japan. In feudal Japan the moving thump of the drum was used to bolster warriors' morale, set a marching pace and relay orders, but taiko drums have also been used in traditional arts as well as festivals and is enjoyed by all ages. We will take up the bachi (wooden sticks) and learn the basic rhythms.

Lunch: At a local restaurant.

Afternoon: Next, we will visit Kodaiji Temple and take part in a traditional tea ceremony. It is said that to truly understand Japanese culture, you must first understand the Japanese tea ceremony. A combination of nourishment and a meditation on imperfection, it is designed to lead its participants towards a communion of man and nature. We will return to the hotel with some time to freshen up before dinner. We then head out by public transport to the historic entertainment area of Gion, the city’s best-known geisha district. Geisha translates as “arts person” and these talented ladies are highly trained in traditional Japanese arts. We will stroll down the lovely Shirakawa Dori (white river street). As we walk through tree-lined streets, we might even glimpse geisha and maiko — apprentice geisha — on their way to evening appointments.

Dinner: At a restaurant in Gion, we will have a traditional Kaiseki dinner, and as a special highlight, enjoy entertainment by a maiko.

Evening: Returning to the hotel, the remainder of the evening is at leisure.

DAY
10
Golden Pavilion, Arashiyama, Bamboo Grove
Kyoto
B,L
Kyoto Tokyu Hotel

Breakfast: Hotel buffet.

Morning: With a local expert, we will head out early this morning and travel by private motorcoach to the exquisite “Golden” Kinkakuji Temple, whose picturesque reflection on a pond makes it one of the most appealing landscapes in Kyoto. We will move on to Arashiyama on the outskirts of Kyoto and walk through the rustling Bamboo Grove, then visit the gardens of Tenryuji Temple. Tenryuji is the head temple of its own school within the Rinzai Zen sect of Japanese Buddhism. Although the temple buildings have been rebuilt multiple times, Tenryuji's garden survived the centuries in its original form. The beautiful landscape garden features a central pond surrounded by rocks, pine trees and the forested Arashiyama mountains.

Lunch: At the Tenryuji Temple, we will have a vegan Buddhist meal.

Afternoon: Returning to Kyoto, the remainder of the afternoon is free.

Dinner: On your own to explore local fare and enjoy what you like.

Evening: At leisure. Prepare for check-out and transfer to Hiroshima in the morning.

DAY
11
Shinkansen to Hiroshima, Peace Park
Hiroshima
B,L
Hotel Granvia Hiroshima

Activity note: Getting on/off a bullet train; the ride from Kyoto to Hiroshima is approximately 2 hours. Walking approximately 5 miles throughout the day; walking and standing about 1.5 hours at the Peace Museum and Peace Park.

Breakfast: Hotel buffet. This morning your larger luggage item will be sent ahead to Osaka. Please have your luggage down to reception by 8am.

Morning: Checking out of the hotel, we will walk to the train station and take the bullet train from Kyoto to Hiroshima. Upon arrival at the station in Hiroshima, we meet our local expert and transfer by motorcoach to a local restaurant for lunch.

Lunch: At one of Hiroshima’s iconic okonomiyaki restaurants, our lunch will be prepared tableside on special steel griddles. Okonomiyaki was originally a snack food but after the A-bomb, when food was scarce, survivors used loose pieces of sheet metal as makeshift griddles to cook whatever scraps they could find such as cabbage, vegetables and egg for protein. In 1945, the American occupation brought boatloads of surplus wheat to a starving nation, beginning the culture of ramen, udon, and adding a thin crepe to create the now signature dish, okonomiyaki.

Afternoon: After lunch we transfer to the Peace Memorial Park. We will first go to the Atomic Bomb Dome near the epicenter of the explosion site, whose ruins have been retained as a tangible reminder of the destruction. We will walk through the Peace Park, passing the memorial statues, to the Museum. The Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum is in the forefront of the global movement towards nuclear disarmament and lasting world peace. At the Peace Memorial Museum, we will hear a presentation in English by a local survivor of the atomic bomb, then explore the museum, guided by the local docents. We will have time for some individual exploration of this thought-provoking institution. We then transfer to our hotel and check in. The remainder of the afternoon and evening is free.

Dinner: On your own to explore local fare and enjoy what you like.

Evening: At leisure.

DAY
12
Miyajima
Hiroshima
B
Hotel Granvia Hiroshima

Activity note: Getting on/off a train; riding about 1/2 hour to/from Miyajima. Getting on/off a large car ferry, with steps from the deck up to the enclosed seating area, and steps to an additional upper, outdoor, covered seating area. Walking approximately 5 miles throughout the day.

Breakfast: Hotel buffet.

Morning: We will meet our local guide, transfer to the train station and board the train to Miyajima-guchi, from where we will walk two blocks from the train station to the ferry wharf, for the 10-minute ferry ride to Miyajima, known as the island of the gods. As the ferry approaches the island, on the right-hand side we will have a water view of the famous torii gates of Itsukushima Shinto Shrine — another UNESCO-designated World Heritage Site — that appear to float on water at high tide. Disembarking the ferry, we will begin a walk with a local expert into the small village, ending at Daisho-in, the main Buddhist temple. The remainder of our time at Miyajima is free time allowing you to explore the island at your leisure.

Lunch: On your own. The main street of Miyajima is lined with food stalls, restaurants, and cafés, even a micro-brewery, with many choices for a snack or a sit down meal.

Afternoon: Free time. You might like to take the cable-car up the mountain for more scenery, hike, or stroll the beach by the torii gates We will rendezvous with our Group Leader at an appointed time and place, then return to Hiroshima via ferry and train.

Dinner: On your own to explore local fare and enjoy what you like.

Evening: At leisure. Prepare for check-out and transfer in the morning.

DAY
13
Himeji Castle, Osaka, Farewell Dinner
Osaka
L,D
Osaka Excel Hotel Tokyu

Activity note: Getting on/off a bullet train; the ride to Himeji is approximately 1 hour. Getting on/off a motorcoach; driving about 60 miles (100 kilometres), approximately 2 hours. Walking approximately 2 miles; standing at Himeji Castle approximately 1.5 hours; steep stairways; removing shoes.

Morning: We will leave Hiroshima by bullet train for the one-hour ride to Himeji. At Himeji Station, we will meet our local expert, board a motorcoach, and ride through town to Himeji Castle. Regarded as the finest surviving example of prototypical Japanese castle architecture, it comprises a network of 83 buildings with advanced defensive systems from the feudal period. The castle was one of the first UNESCO-designated World Heritage Sites in Japan for its stone and wood construction. At the castle, those who prefer not to climb the steep stairs may remain in the gardens with seating areas that have beautiful views. We will then walk about 300 yards to the adjacent Kokoen Gardens and stroll through the charming landscape, divided into nine walled gardens in designs from the Edo Period

Lunch: At a local restaurant.

Afternoon: We will board our motorcoach, drive to Osaka, check in to our hotel, and reclaim our large suitcases. We will have some time to freshen up and relax before dinner.

Dinner: We will walk to a nearby restaurant for a typical contemporary Japanese dinner in a private room. Share favorite experiences with new Road Scholar friends during our farewell dinner and enjoy karaoke — developed in Japan!

Evening: Returning to the hotel, prepare for check-out and departure tomorrow.

DAY
14
Program Concludes
In Flight
B

Activity note: Hotel check-out 11:00 a.m. Airport transfer at 12:30 p.m.

Breakfast: Hotel buffet.

Morning: Free time. Go out for some independent exploration or just relax. Luggage may be stored at the reception desk after hotel check-out time.

Lunch: On your own. Osaka is a food lover’s paradise. The streets are full of restaurants large and small, and food stalls with local specialties.

Afternoon: We will meet back at the hotel before we have a motorcoach transfer to Osaka Airport (formally known as Kansai International Airport) at 12:30 p.m. This concludes our program. If you are returning home, safe travels. If you are staying on independently, have a wonderful time. If you are transferring to another Road Scholar program, detailed instructions are included in your Information Packet for that program. We hope you enjoy Road Scholar learning adventures and look forward to having you on rewarding programs in the future. Don’t forget to join our Facebook page and follow us on Instagram. Best wishes for all your journeys!






Important registration tip:
If you want to attend the live lecture, please do not wait until the last minute to enroll.
If you enroll after a lecture is complete, we’ll send you a recording of the event.