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New York

Women’s Suffrage: Fighting for the Vote in New York State

Journey to the homeland of the American Women’s Suffrage Movement to learn about some of the most influential Suffragists and visit important landmarks of the fight for equal rights.
Rating (5)
Program No. 23474RJ
Length
6 days
Starts at
1,599
New York

Women’s Suffrage: Fighting for the Vote in New York State

Journey to the homeland of the American Women’s Suffrage Movement to learn about some of the most influential Suffragists and visit important landmarks of the fight for equal rights.
Length
6 days
Starts at
1,599
Program No. 23474 RJ
climate
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At a Glance

The 19th Amendment passed in the United States Senate in 1919 and was ratified in 1920 — just 100 years ago. This monumental victory did not come without a lot of hard work, strength and determination of countless women across the country. Celebrate the centennial of women’s suffrage in the United States as you take a trip to the homeland of the movement — Seneca Falls, New York — and pay homage to some of the most important figures in the fight for equal rights. During lectures with local experts, find out how New York became the focal point, and examine the complex intersection of race and Women’s Suffrage. Plus, visit the Women’s Rights Historical Park and other spots important to the fight for equal rights.
Small Group
Small Group
Love to learn and explore in a small-group setting? These adventures offer small, personal experiences with groups of 10 to 24 participants.

Best of all, you'll ...

  • Learn about some of the most important leaders of the Women’s Suffrage Movement — Susan B. Anthony, Harriet Tubman and Elizabeth Cady Stanton – during visits to their homes.
  • Stand where 300 women stood in Wesleyan Chapel for the first Women’s Rights convention in 1848.
  • Meet a leader of the suffrage movement during a historical reenactment, and learn more about the contributions of American women throughout history at the National Women’s Hall of Fame.
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton: An American Life
by Lori D. Ginzberg
In this subtly crafted biography, the historian Lori D. Ginzberg narrates the life of a woman of great charm, enormous appetite, and extraordinary intellectual gifts who turned the limitations placed on women like herself into a universal philosophy of equal rights. Few could match Stanton's self-confidence; loving an argument, she rarely wavered in her assumption that she had won. But she was no secular saint, and her positions were not always on the side of the broadest possible conception of justice and social change. Elitism runs through Stanton's life and thought, defined most often by class, frequently by race, and always by intellect. Even her closest friends found her absolutism both thrilling and exasperating, for Stanton could be an excellent ally and a bothersome menace, sometimes simultaneously. At once critical and admiring, Ginzberg captures Stanton's ambiguous place in the world of reformers and intellectuals, describes how she changed the world, and suggests that Stanton left a mixed legacy that continues to haunt American feminism.
Women Will Vote: Winning Suffrage in New York State
by Susan Goodier and Karen Pastorello
Women Will Vote celebrates the 2017 centenary of women’s right to full suffrage in New York State. Susan Goodier and Karen Pastorello highlight the activism of rural, urban, African American, Jewish, immigrant, and European American women, as well as male suffragists, both upstate and downstate, that led to the positive outcome of the 1917 referendum. Goodier and Pastorello argue that the popular nature of the women’s suffrage movement in New York State and the resounding success of the referendum at the polls relaunched suffrage as a national issue. If women had failed to gain the vote in New York, Goodier and Pastorello claim, there is good reason to believe that the passage and ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment would have been delayed. Women Will Vote makes clear how actions of New York’s patchwork of suffrage advocates heralded a gigantic political, social, and legal shift in the United States. Readers will discover that although these groups did not always collaborate, by working in their own ways toward the goal of enfranchising women they essentially formed a coalition. Together, they created a diverse social and political movement that did not rely solely on the motivating force of white elites and a leadership based in New York City. Goodier and Pastorello convincingly argue that the agitation and organization that led to New York women’s victory in 1917 changed the course of American history.
Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom
by Catherine Clinton
Celebrated for her courageous exploits as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, Harriet Tubman has entered history as one of nineteenth-century America's most enduring and important figures. But just who was this remarkable woman? To John Brown, leader of the Harpers Ferry slave uprising, she was General Tubman. For the many slaves she led north to freedom, she was Moses. To the slaveholders who sought her capture, she was a thief and a trickster. To abolitionists, she was a prophet. Now, in a biography widely praised for its impeccable research and its compelling narrative, Harriet Tubman is revealed for the first time as a singular and complex character, a woman who defied simple categorization.
America’s Women: 400 Years of Dolls, Drudges, Helpmates and Heroines (P.S.)
by Gail Collins
America's Women tells the story of more than four centuries of history. It features a stunning array of personalities, from the women peering worriedly over the side of the Mayflower to feminists having a grand old time protesting beauty pageants and bridal fairs. Courageous, silly, funny, and heartbreaking, these women shaped the nation and our vision of what it means to be female in America.
African American Women and the Vote, 1837-1965
by Ann D. Gordon
Written by leading scholars of African American and women's history, the essays in this volume seek to reconceptualize the political history of black women in the United States by placing them "at the center of our thinking." The book explores how slavery, racial discrimination, and gender shaped the goals that African American women set for themselves, their families, and their race and looks at the political tools at their disposal. By identifying key turning points for black women, the essays create a new chronology and a new paradigm for historical analysis. The chronology begins in 1837 with the interracial meeting of antislavery women in New York City and concludes with the civil rights movement of the 1960s. The contributors focus on specific examples of women pursuing a dual ambition: to gain full civil and political rights and to improve the social conditions of African Americans. Together, the essays challenge us to rethink common generalizations that govern much of our historical thinking about the experience of African American women.
Susan B Anthony: Biography of a Singular Feminist
by Kathleen Barry
Barry, noted feminist sociologists and author of, Female sexual slavery, offers an enlightening biography of perhaps the most unconventional woman of her century. By drawing upon letters, diaries, and other documents, she integrates Anthony's personal story into the political, economic, and cultural milieu of 19th c. America.
Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women’s Rights Movement
by Sally McMillen
In the quiet town of Seneca Falls, New York, over the course of two days in July, 1848, a small group of women and men, led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, held a convention that would launch the women's rights movement and change the course of history. In Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement, Sally McMillen reveals, for the first time, the full significance of that revolutionary convention and the enormous changes it produced. The book covers 50 years of women's activism, from 1840 to 1890, focusing on four extraordinary figures--Mott, Stanton, Lucy Stone, and Susan B. Anthony. McMillen tells the stories of their lives, how they came to take up the cause of women's rights, the astonishing advances they made during their lifetimes, and the far-reaching effects of the work they did. At the convention they asserted full equality with men, argued for greater legal rights, greater professional and education opportunities, and the right to vote--ideas considered wildly radical at the time. Indeed, looking back at the convention two years later, Anthony called it "the grandest and greatest reform of all time.





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