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1475
Louisiana

New Orleans at a Slower Pace: A City of History, Culture and Celebration

Discover artistry and heritage in New Orleans as you explore the city’s historic districts, learn about Cajun cooking and attend a performance at the Jazz National Park Museum.
Rating (5)
Program No. 1475RJ
Length
6 days
Starts at
1,149
Louisiana

New Orleans at a Slower Pace: A City of History, Culture and Celebration

Discover artistry and heritage in New Orleans as you explore the city’s historic districts, learn about Cajun cooking and attend a performance at the Jazz National Park Museum.
Length
6 days
Starts at
1,149
Program No. 1475 RJ
Prefer to enroll or inquire by phone? 800-454-5768
climate
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DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Oct 3 - Oct 8, 2021
Starting at
1,149
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Oct 3 - Oct 8, 2021
Starting at
1,399

At a Glance

New Orleans beckons with three centuries of history and culture. Become immersed in this rich heritage as expert instructors lead you on an exploration of the city’s architectural styles, literary heroes, political figures, music and food. Learn about festivals that are both self-expression and a celebration of life, from Mardi Gras to Jazz Fest. Take field trips to Lake Pontchartrain, the French Quarter, the Garden District, the Mississippi River, Congo Square and the Treme area. Other highlights include the amazing Sculpture Garden in City Park and the world class National World War II Museum.
Activity Level
Easy Going
Moderate walking up to eight blocks, flat terrain.

Best of all, you'll ...

  • Hear a musical performance at the Jazz National Park Museum and venture into the French Quarter to visit the Mardi Gras Museum.
  • Admire historic New Orleans homes as you ride along historic St. Charles Avenue and walk into the Garden District.
  • Learn the tricks of Cajun and Creole cooking at a popular culinary arts school, complete with recipes for you to take home.

General Notes

You may enjoy a more active program "Signature City New Orleans: City Of Mystery & Intrigue" (#2856) or a more active, small-group program "Jazz, Jambalaya and Joie de Vivre in New Orleans" (#21665); both based in the French Quarter.
Featured Expert
All Experts
Profile Image
Brian Altobello
Brian is a native of New Orleans with a master’s in U.S. History and 29 years of experience teaching at the high school level. He is a U.S. Army veteran and author of two books: “New Orleans Goes to War” and “Into the Shadows Furious,” a narrative on the U.S. invasion of New Georgia Island. Currently, Brian is the Director of Curriculum and Instruction for Social Studies at Renew Schools, a five-school charter organization in New Orleans. He is married to a travel-writing English teacher.

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

Profile Image of Brian Altobello
Brian Altobello View biography
Brian is a native of New Orleans with a master’s in U.S. History and 29 years of experience teaching at the high school level. He is a U.S. Army veteran and author of two books: “New Orleans Goes to War” and “Into the Shadows Furious,” a narrative on the U.S. invasion of New Georgia Island. Currently, Brian is the Director of Curriculum and Instruction for Social Studies at Renew Schools, a five-school charter organization in New Orleans. He is married to a travel-writing English teacher.
Profile Image of Nellie Watson
Nellie Watson View biography
Nellie Watson’s love of architecture was born at an early age, growing up in the unique environment of New Orleans’ old neighborhoods. Studying architecture and design in college, her career began at two architecture firms before establishing her own company — Watson & Withrow, Inc. After working the Louisiana World Exposition in 1984, she founded Watson Models, working on major development projects around the world. Nellie gives workshops on the art of model making and enjoys sharing her love for the local culture and architecture.
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Creole New Orleans Race and Americanization
by Arthur Hirsch and John Logsdon
This collection of six original essays explores the peculiar ethnic composition and history of New Orleans, which the authors persuasively argue is unique among American cities. The focus of Creole New Orleans is on the development of a colonial Franco-African culture in the city, the ways that culture was influenced by the arrival of later immigrants, and the processes that led to the eventual dominance of the Anglo-American community.
Life On The Mississippi
by Mark Twain
An invaluable companion to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Life on the Mississippi is Mark Twain's inimitable portrait of 'the great Father of Waters'. Part memoir, part travelogue, it expresses the full range of Twain's literary personality, and remains the most vivid, boisterous and provocative account of the cultural and societal history of the Mississippi Valley, from 'the golden age' of steamboating to the violence wrought by the Civil War.
Why New Orleans Matters
by Tom Piazza
In the aftermath of Katrina and the disaster that followed, promises were made, forgotten, and renewed. Now what will become of New Orleans in the years ahead? What do this proud, battered city and its people mean to America and the world? Award-winning author and longtime New Orleans resident Tom Piazza illuminates the storied culture and uncertain future of this great and neglected American metropolis by evoking the sensuous rapture of the city that gave us jazz music and Creole cooking; examining its deep undercurrents of corruption, racism, and injustice; and explaining how its people endure and transcend those conditions. And, perhaps most important, he asks us all to consider the spirit of this place and all the things it has shared with the world: its grace and beauty, resilience and soul.
Rising Tide
by John Barry
An American epic of science, politics, race, honor, high society, and the Mississippi River, Rising Tide tells the riveting and nearly forgotten story of the greatest natural disaster this country has ever known -- the Mississippi flood of 1927. The river inundated the homes of nearly one million people, helped elect Huey Long governor and made Herbert Hoover president, drove hundreds of thousands of blacks north, and transformed American society and politics forever.
Confederacy of Dunces
by John Kennedy Toole
A Confederacy of Dunces is a picaresque novel written by American novelist John Kennedy Toole, published by Louisiana State University Press in 1980, eleven years after the author's suicide. The book, published through the efforts of writer Walker Percy (who also contributed a revealing foreword) and Toole's mother Thelma Toole, quickly became a cult classic, and later a mainstream success. Toole posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1981. It is now considered a canonical work of modern Southern literature, in the USA. The title derives from the epigraph by Jonathan Swift: "When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him." The story is set in New Orleans in the early 1960s. The central character is Ignatius J. Reilly, an educated but slothful 30-year-old man still living with his mother in the city's Uptown neighborhood, who, due to an incident early in the book, must set out to get a job. In his quest for employment he has various adventures with colorful French Quarter characters.
All the Kings Men
by Robert Penn Warren
All the King's Men traces the rise and fall of demagogue Willie Stark, a fictional character loosely based on Governor Huey ""Kingfish"" Long of Louisiana. Stark begins his political career as an idealistic man of the people but soon becomes corrupted by success and caught between dreams of service and an insatiable lust for power.
A Streetcar Named Desire
by Tennessee Williams
Widely considered a landmark play, A Streetcar Named Desire deals with a culture clash between two characters, Blanche DuBois, a relic of the Old South, and Stanley Kowalski, a rising member of the industrial, urban working class. American playwright Tennessee Williams received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1948.
Meals
13 Meals
5 Breakfasts
4 Lunches
4 Dinners
The following choices may be available when requested in advance: Vegetarian, Gluten Free
Lodging
Lodgings may differ by date. Select a date to see the lodgings specific to that date.
Display
Oct 03, 2021 - Oct 08, 2021
  • Oct 03, 2021 - Oct 08, 2021
5 nights
New Orleans
The first sounds of jazz were heard in the dance halls on the very blocks surrounding the hotel. Magnificent jazz murals commemorating this historic neighborhood including a 150-foot clarinet mural...New Orleans' newest landmark! The hotel, in the heart of downtown, is 6 blocks from the French Quarter. True Southern hospitality will make you feel right at home while still close to all the action. Multi-lingual staff.





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