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Alaska

Discover Alaska by Rail: A Traveling Adventure

Program No. 1014RJ
Learn about the Alaska Railroad while journeying its entire length. Explore a cross-section of Alaska life (and wildlife) in Fairbanks, Denali, Anchorage and Seward.
Length
11 days
Rating (4.94)
Activity Level
Starts at
6,349

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DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Jun 2 - Jun 12, 2023
Starting at
6,349
Jun 5 - Jun 15, 2023
Starting at
6,349
Jun 23 - Jul 3, 2023
Starting at
6,349
Jun 26 - Jul 6, 2023
Starting at
6,349
Jul 14 - Jul 24, 2023
Starting at
6,349
Jul 17 - Jul 27, 2023
Starting at
6,349
Aug 4 - Aug 14, 2023
Starting at
6,349
Aug 7 - Aug 17, 2023
Starting at
6,349
Aug 25 - Sep 4, 2023
Starting at
6,349
Aug 28 - Sep 7, 2023
Starting at
6,349
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
Jun 2 - Jun 12, 2023
Starting at
7,689
Jun 5 - Jun 15, 2023
Starting at
7,689
Jun 23 - Jul 3, 2023
Starting at
7,689
Jun 26 - Jul 6, 2023
Starting at
7,689
Jul 14 - Jul 24, 2023
Starting at
7,689
Jul 17 - Jul 27, 2023
Starting at
7,689
Aug 4 - Aug 14, 2023
Starting at
7,689
Aug 7 - Aug 17, 2023
Starting at
7,689
Aug 25 - Sep 4, 2023
Starting at
7,689
Aug 28 - Sep 7, 2023
Starting at
7,689

At a Glance

All Aboard! Journey the entire 470-mile length of the historic Alaska Railroad from Fairbanks to Seward. Along the way you'll learn about life in the North and its people, culture and wildlife. Ride to Denali National Park- home of North America’s tallest mountain, 20,310-foot Denali where you'll explore its trails with one of Denali Education Center's educators. Then you'll head to Anchorage and experience the cultures of Alaska’s Native groups before heading to the harbor town of Seward to take in the grandeur of Kenai Fjords National Park.
Activity Level
On Your Feet
Minimal walking and standing. Optional walks of up to three miles. Elevations on your bus trip up to 3,900 feet.

Best of all, you’ll…

  • View stunning scenery and wildlife on a journey into Denali National Park.
  • Visit the Alaska Native Heritage Center to learn about Alaska's diverse array of cultures and traditions.
  • Explore Kenai Fjords National Park by boat to spot glaciers, marine mammals, birds and the rugged coast.
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Denali's Howl
by Andy Hall
In the summer of 1967, twelve young men ascended Alaska’s Mount McKinley—known to the locals as Denali. Engulfed by a once-in-a-lifetime blizzard, only five made it back down. Andy Hall, a journalist and son of the park superintendent at the time, was living in the park when the tragedy occurred and spent years tracking down rescuers, survivors, lost documents, and recordings of radio communications. In Denali’s Howl, Hall reveals the full story of the expedition in a powerful retelling that will mesmerize the climbing community as well as anyone interested in mega-storms and man’s sometimes deadly drive to challenge the forces of nature.
Alaska Native Cultures and Issues
by Edited by Libby Roderick
Making up more than ten percent of Alaska's population, Native Alaskans are the state's largest minority group. Yet most non-Native Alaskans know surprisingly little about the histories and cultures of their indigenous neighbors, or about the important issues they face. This concise book compiles frequently asked questions and provides informative and accessible responses that shed light on some common misconceptions. With responses composed by scholars within the represented communities and reviewed by a panel of experts, this easy-to-read compendium aims to facilitate a deeper exploration and richer discussion of the complex and compelling issues that are part of Alaska Native life today.
Coming Into the Country
by John McPhee
Coming into the Country is an unforgettable account of Alaska and Alaskans. It is a rich tapestry of vivid characters, observed landscapes, and descriptive narrative, in three principal segments that deal, respectively, with a total wilderness, with urban Alaska, and with life in the remoteness of the bush.
Rhythm of the Wild
by Kim Heacox
Rhythm of the Heart is a memoir about Kim Heacox’s 30+ year relationship with the most iconic landscape in Alaska, Denali National Park. Woven throughout the personal narrative are stories on the human and natural histories of the Park, garnished with a conservation polemic. Heacox shows how a place like Denali can touch a life, even save a life, quietly, profoundly, day after day, year after year, and how that saving multiplied by millions of lives over a century makes the world a better place. Heacox makes the argument, through his beautiful and impassioned prose, that we must save these places so they in turn will save us. Denali National Park is the most accessible subarctic sanctuary in the world, and has awakened millions of people to what’s authentic, priceless and true.
The Wilderness of Denali
by Charles Sheldon
Originally published by Charles Scribner's Sons in 1930, The Wilderness of Denali is a memoir of three years of hunting the area of Alaska surrounding Mt. McKinley. It is a classic of American adventure—a book written by a man who was willing to risk his life in pursuit of grizzly bears and the elusive mountain sheep. The account was written each night by campfire as Sheldon discovered what is still regarded as the most scenic wilderness in America.
Two Old Women: An Alaskan Legend of Betrayal, Courage and Survival
by Velma Wallis
Based on an Athabascan Indian legend passed along for many generations from mothers to daughters of the upper Yukon River Valley in Alaska, this is the suspenseful, shocking, ultimately inspirational tale of two old women abandoned by their tribe during a brutal winter famine. Though these women have been known to complain more than contribute, they now must either survive on their own or die trying. In simple but vivid detail, Velma Wallis depicts a landscape and way of life that are at once merciless and starkly beautiful. In her old women, she has created two heroines of steely determination whose story of betrayal, friendship, community, and forgiveness "speaks straight to the heart with clarity, sweetness, and wisdom" (Ursula K. Le Guin)
Snapshots from the Past: A Roadside History of Denali National Park
by Jane Bryant
Visitors come to Denali National Park and Preserve for many reasons - spectacular scenery, wildlife, the continent's highest peak, and the cultural experiences. This amazing book does a wonderful job of presenting snapshots of Denali's past and telling many of the stories that have shaped its history. This book included user-friendly maps of the Park's road and innumerable historic photos to highlight its content. It is arranged to follow the park road from east to west, from the park entrance to Kantishna, and is a must-read for anyone interested in delving into the Park's rich history.
Shopping for Porcupine A Life in Arctic Alaska
by Seth Kantner
Seth Kantner returns to the setting of his debut novel , Ordinary Wolves, with an autobiographical account of his own life growing up in Northern Alaska. Beginning with his parents’ migration to the Alaskan wilderness in the 1950s and extending to his own attempts to balance hunting with writing, Kantner recalls cold nights wrapped in caribou hides, fur-clad visitors arriving on dog sleds, swimming amidst ice floes for wounded waterfowl, and his longstanding respect for the old Iñupiaq ways. Captured in words and images, these details combine to reveal a singular landscape at a pivotal moment in its history. Both an elegy and a romp, the book illuminates a world few will see as Kantner has.
Two in the Far North
by Margaret Murie
This enduring story of life, adventure, and love in Alaska was written by a woman who embraced the remote Alaskan wilderness and became one of its strongest advocates. In this moving testimonial to the preservation of the Arctic wilderness, Mardy Murie writes from her heart about growing up in Fairbanks, becoming the first woman graduate of the University of Alaska, and marrying noted biologist Olaus J. Murie. So begins her lifelong journey in Alaska and on to Jackson Hole, Wyoming where along with her husband and others, they founded The Wilderness Society. Mardy's work as one of the earliest female voices for the wilderness movement earned her the Presidential Medal of Freedom.
Last New Land
by Wayne Mergler
Through time, tales both oral and written have immortalized America's last wilderness. Editor Wayne Mergler scoured Alaska's literary tradition for the best writing the state has to offer and did not come up empty-handed. From the Native legends of the Creation to Jack London's stirring stories of frontier survival, to John Haines's more contemporary reflections on homesteading. The Last New Land gathers a rich and comprehensive sampling of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry about the Northland.
Arctic Dreams
by Barry Lopez
Based on Barry Lopez’s years spent traveling the Arctic regions in the company of Eskimo hunting parties and scientific expeditions alike, Arctic Dreams investigates the unique terrain of the human mind, thrown into relief against the vastness of the tundra and the frozen ocean. Eye-opening and profoundly moving, it is a magnificent appreciation of how wilderness challenges and inspires us.
The Seventymile Kid: The Lost Legacy of Harry Karstens and the First Ascent of Mount McKinley
by Tom Walker
The Seventymile Kid tells the remarkable account of Harry Karstens, who was the actual—if unheralded—leader of the Hudson Stuck Expedition that was the first to summit Mount McKinley in Alaska. All but forgotten by history, a young Karstens arrived in the Yukon during the 1897 Gold Rush, gained fame as a dog musher hauling U.S. Mail in Alaska, and eventually became the first superintendent of Mount McKinley National Park (now known as Denali National Park and Preserve). Aided by Karstens's own journals, longtime Denali writer and photographer Tom Walker uncovered archival information about the Stuck climb, and reveals that the Stuck "triumph" was an expedition marred by significant conflict. Without Karstens's wilderness skills and Alaska-honed tenacity, it is quite possible Hudson Stuck would never have climbed anywhere near the summit of McKinley. Yet the two men had a falling out shortly after the climb and never spoke again. In this book, Walker attempts to set the record straight about the historic first ascent itself, as well as other pioneer attempts by Frederick Cook and Judge Wickersham.
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11 days
10 nights
25 meals
10 B 7 L 8 D
DAY
1
Check-in, Registration, Orientation, Welcome Dinner
Fairbanks
D
River's Edge Resort

Activity note: Welcome to Alaska! Check into your hotel, meet fellow participants and Group Leader, and kick off your learning adventure.

Dinner: At the hotel.

Evening: Orientation. After dinner, the Group Leader will greet everyone and lead introductions. This is a great time to get to know your fellow Road Scholars. We will review the up-to-date program schedule, discuss roles and responsibilities, logistics, safety guidelines, emergency procedures, and answer questions. We will review COVID-19 protocols and will adhere to local COVID-19 guidelines and requirements throughout the program.Here are some topics that will be covered during your orientation: evening presentation topics and local presenters, free time options, and any changes to scheduled programming. Periods in the schedule designated as “Free time” and “At leisure” offer opportunities to do what you like and make your experience even more meaningful and memorable according to your personal preferences. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions. Program activities, schedules, personnel, and indicated distances or times may change due to local circumstances or conditions. In the event of changes, we will alert you as quickly as possible. Thank you for your understanding.

DAY
2
Fairbanks Mining History, Cultural Center
Fairbanks
B,L
River's Edge Resort

Activity note: Getting on/off a motorcoach; Drive 35 miles total over the course of the day. Light walking up to 2 miles; mostly paved, 1-4 steps possible, minimal elevation change. Some standing, no more than 15 minutes at a time.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: We'll board a motorcoach and head to the Tanana Valley to learn about Fairbanks rich mining history. Fairbanks was founded in 1901, the same year gold was discovered in the hills north of the Chena and Tanana rivers. The resulting rush of hopeful miners and the gold they found helped build Fairbanks into the city it is today. You'll have a chance to see artifacts from that first gold rush and learn how mining practices have changed over the years. Before we depart, you'll be able to look for a little pay dirt of your own and pan for gold.

Lunch: At a local restaurant.

Afternoon: We'll head to the Morris Thompson Cultural Center to learn about the native peoples who have called the Fairbanks area home for thousands of years. The Center is also home to the Public Lands Information Center and features interactive exhibits, artwork, and films. We'll talk with a local expert about the culture and history of Interior Alaskan Native people and have time to explore the Center on our own.

Dinner: This dinner has been excluded from the program cost and is on your own to enjoy what you'd like. Ask your Group Leader for suggestions or strike out on your own to find some flavorful local fare.

Evening: At leisure. Pack and prepare for check-out and transfer to Denali via train in the morning.

DAY
3
Train to Denali; Welcome to the Subarctic
Denali National Park
B,L,D
Denali Education Center

Activity note: Getting on and off a motorcoach; 5 miles total over 15 minutes. Getting on and off the train; 130 miles to Denali Railroad Depot. Getting on and off a bus; 10 miles total over 20 minutes. Up to 2-miles walking possible throughout the day on compact surfaces and forested paths, with no significant elevation gain.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: After checking out of our hotel, we'll take a motorcoach to the Fairbanks Depot, the starting point for our journey across Alaska by rail. Once aboard, we'll travel along the first leg of the 470-mile long Alaska Railroad as it winds its way south to the Alaska Range and Denali National Park. As we near the Park, the tracks wind through a canyon along the Nenana River at the base of Mt. Healy. From 1923 to 1971, the only way to reach the Park was by train, so you'll arrive at the Denali Depot in nearly the same way a traveler from the early 20th century did. From the depot, we'll head to the Denali Education Center campus, our home for the next three nights. DEC's tranquil, wooded 10-acre campus is located seven miles south of the Denali Park Entrance along the banks of the Nenana River.

Lunch: At Denali Education Center's Riverside Hall.

Afternoon: After lunch, we’ll have a short orientation to DEC, its amenities, and campus. Afterwards, we'll hear from an expert field educator about the sometimes surprising, always extreme conditions that shape life in Denali and define our subarctic ecosystem in a hybrid nature walk and lecture.

Dinner: At Denali Education Center's Riverside Hall.

Evening: At leisure. Relax and unwind after a long day of travel, or stretch your legs and explore Denali! Riverside Hall is available for your use 24 hours a day. Grab a book from the library, enjoy a hot beverage on the deck, or play a game with friends!

DAY
4
Heart of the Wilderness, Journey into Denali National Park
Denali National Park
B,L,D
Denali Education Center

Activity note: Getting on/off a bus. Driving into Denali National Park, approximately 5 hours total aboard, with stops to view wildlife and rest stops every 1-1.5 hours. The Park Road is mostly unpaved, bumpy ride possible. Walking up to 1-mile throughout the day; opportunities for more walking dependent on personal preference. Bring a camera and binoculars, if you have them.

Breakfast: At Denali Education Center's Riverside Hall.

Morning: After breakfast, we'll take a bus to Denali National Park, where we'll visit the "front country" area, which includes the Denali Visitor Center, the Morino Grill restaurant, the Alaska Geographic bookstore, and numerous hiking and walking trails.You'll have time for independent exploration, during which the Group Leader will be available to offer recommendations or answer questions.The Denali Visitor Center features an impressive exhibit hall and regular showings of "Heartbeats of Denali," a 20-minute non-narrated film that shares visuals of the various seasons, landscapes, and wildlife of this beautiful place. Elective: Join an educator for a short hike into the Park's storied past. We'll see historic building remains and learn about the beginnings of the Park and the now vanished boomtown of McKinley Station.

Lunch: In the field, you'll enjoy a boxed lunch.

Afternoon: We’ll board a park bus and travel deep into Denali National Park on a journey into the wilderness. Along the way, we’ll enjoy commentary about the park from our bus driver and on-board educator while we take in breathtaking views of the many peaks of the Alaska Range. Have your cameras ready, the ride offers a good chance to view Denali's wildlife, which may include caribou, grizzly bears, Dall sheep, moose, and more! As you traverse the landscape, your on-board educator will keep their eyes peeled for wildlife and learning opportunities. Throughout the afternoon, your educator will explain the history, ecology, and cultural significance of Denali National Park. Opportunities to stretch your legs will be available throughout the trip. Typically, restrooms are available every 1-1.5 hours. We will stop periodically to observe wildlife when sighted and for photo opportunities.

Dinner: At Denali Education Center's Riverside Hall.

Evening: At leisure.

DAY
5
Wildlife of Denali; Enjoy a Hike or Free Time
Denali National Park
B,L,D
Denali Education Center

Activity note: Light walking on packed gravel surface. Less than one mile. Opportunities for more activity dependent on personal preference.

Breakfast: At Denali Education Center's Riverside Hall.

Morning: Denali is home to 39 species of mammals and 169 species of birds. We’ll join a field educator in class in Riverside Hall to discuss the extraordinary adaptations that allow local wildlife to survive in Alaska’s extreme subarctic climate. During this educational program, we will examine fur pelts, skulls, and hooves from regional species as we learn about how they survive in the North.

Lunch: At Denali Education Center's Riverside Hall.

Afternoon: Choose your own adventure on a free afternoon in Denali. Set off on an excursion provided by a local operator, like rafting, flightseeing or flyfishing. (Your Group Leader can help you schedule and purchase these activities in advance when you arrive in Denali.) Spend your afternoon exploring the boreal forest on a front country trail with one of Denali Education Center's field educators. You may decide to head over to the Denali National Park kennels to catch the 30-minute ranger-led presentation on Denali's canine rangers. Or you can spend this time exploring the Denali Visitor Center, the Morino Grill restaurant, and Alaska Geographic bookstore.

Dinner: At Denali Education Center's Riverside Hall.

Evening: We'll gather together for a presentation given by a local speaker on a topic pertinent to the program theme.

DAY
6
Visit a Local Dog Musher, Train to Anchorage
Downtown Anchorage, AK
B,L,D
The Historic Anchorage Hotel

Activity note: Getting on and off a bus. Driving about 36 miles total approximately 1.5 hours. Standing up to 30 minutes outside during field trip. Benches available. Getting on and off the train, 230 miles total over 9 hours. 1-2 miles total of light walking on paved and unpaved surface with no significant elevation gain. 1-4 steps possible while moving about the train.

Breakfast: At Denali Education Center's Riverside Hall.

Morning: After checking out of our rooms at the Denali Education Center, we'll board a bus and travel to the kennels of a local musher to learn about the life of a working sled dog, the art of mushing, and what it's like to train for races like the Yukon Quest and the Iditarod. We'll even get a chance to interact with these furry athletes. Afterward, we'll head to the Denali Depot and board a train bound for Anchorage.

Lunch: Aboard the train.

Afternoon: Enjoy beautiful scenery on the Alaska Railroad as we wind our way south through Broad Pass and over the Alaska Range to Anchorage. Weather and visibility permitting, this leg of the journey can provide beautiful panoramic views of Mt. Denali. You'll also be treated to a vista of Hurricane Gulch from a 296-foot railroad bridge. Afterward, the tracks veer away from the road system and into the backcountry. Keep your eyes peeled for remote, off-grid cabins. These cabins are only accessible by train--Alaska Railroad has a flagstop service that allows these residents to get on and off a train with the wave of a flag. The train will pass through the quirky town of Talkeetna before following the Susitna River south toward the Chugach mountains and Anchorage. As always, watch for wildlife on this scenic journey. Moose are commonly spotted along this route!

Dinner: Aboard the train.

Evening: We'll arrive in Anchorage and check into our hotel. The rest of the evening is at leisure.

DAY
7
Alaska Native Heritage Center; Anchorage Museum
Downtown Anchorage, AK
B,D
The Historic Anchorage Hotel

Activity note: Getting on/off a bus. Driving up to 20 miles over the course of the day. Light standing and town walking up to 2 miles: mostly paved and gentle inclines possible. Steps possible, elevator available. Opportunities for more walking dependent on personal preference.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: We'll board a charter bus and head to the Alaska Native Heritage Center: a gathering place that celebrates, perpetuates, and shares Alaska Native culture, language, heritage and tradition. Explore the indoor and outdoor exhibits and take in one-of-a-kind demonstrations by Alaska Native artists, dancers, musicians, and story tellers of all ages.

Lunch: This lunch has been excluded from the program cost and is on your own to enjoy what you'd like. Ask your Group Leader for suggestions, or strike out and explore downtown Anchorage.

Afternoon: We will meet at Alaska's largest museum: the Anchorage Museum. Through a combination of art and design, history, science and culture, the Anchorage Museum invites us on a rich, deep exploration of the history, land and people of Alaska. A docent will join us on an investigation of the one of the museum's permanent collections. We'll learn about Alaska's history before taking time to explore the Museum's extensive collection of Alaskan art and artifacts.

Dinner: At a local restaurant.

Evening: At leisure. Explore downtown Anchorage or rest and relax before our early train transfer to Seward tomorrow morning.

DAY
8
Train to Seward, Seward's History
Seward
B,D
Gateway Hotel

Activity note: Getting on/off a train. Travel by rail approx. 120 miles, over approximately 4 hrs. Getting on/off a bus. Driving about 15 miles total over the course of the day. Light town walking up to 1.5 miles over pavement and some uneven terrain.

Breakfast: Due to an early departure time, breakfast will be aboard the train.

Morning: We'll check-out of our hotel and take a motorcoach to the Anchorage depot for an early morning train to Seward. This last stretch of the Alaska Railroad has been called one of the most spectacular railroad journeys on the continent. We'll first wind our way southeast along the Turnagain Arm. When the train reaches the end of the Arm, it sets out into backcountry wilderness of Chugach National Forest. We'll encounter gorgeous views of Spencer Lake and the massive Spencer Glacier, Bartlett Galcier and Trail Glacier on our way south to the coastal town of Seward. Once we arrive, we'll board a bus headed to "downtown" Seward.

Lunch: This lunch has been excluded from the program cost and is on your own to enjoy what you'd like. Ask your Group Leader for suggestions, or explore Seward on your own.

Afternoon: After lunch, we'll meet at an announced time and place. We'll learn about the origin and home of the Alaska state flag, visit Mile-0 of the Iditarod Trail and dive into the history of this harbor town on a expert-led exploration of Seward by mini-bus. When we've finished, the bus will drop us at our hotel for check-in.

Dinner: At a local restaurant.

Evening: At leisure. Stretch your legs and explore this beautiful harbor town, or unpack and relax after a day of travel.

DAY
9
Kenai Fjords National Park Marine Wildlife Cruise
Seward
B,L
Gateway Hotel

Activity note: Short walk to the small boat harbor: less than a mile. Getting on/off a boat; riding approximately 6 hours. Indoor and outdoor seating available. Potential for rain and wind, please dress accordingly. Please bring a camera and binoculars if you have them.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: After a short walk to the small boat harbor, we’ll board a catamaran-style boat for a full-day, expert-led field trip into Kenai Fjords National Park and Resurrection Bay. A park ranger will be aboard the boat to provide interpretation and answer questions. This is a great opportunity to spot wildlife, so be on the lookout (and have your camera ready!) as we travel through this strikingly beautiful habitat. We may be lucky enough to see whales, sea otters, Steller sea lions, harbor seals, puffins, eagles, and more. Along our route, we will visit two active tidewater glaciers: the Holgate and the Aialik.

Lunch: Aboard the boat.

Afternoon: We’ll continue our expert-led field trip aboard the boat in Kenai Fjords National Park and Resurrection Bay. Upon our return to the dock, we’ll walk back to the hotel. Before breaking for the evening we'll discuss the following day's schedule and our travels north to Anchorage. The rest of the evening is yours for you to do any final exploring of Seward.

Dinner: This dinner has been excluded from the program cost and is on your own to enjoy what you'd like. Your Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions.

Evening: At leisure.

DAY
10
Alaska SeaLife Center, Aviation Museum
Anchorage
B,L,D
Courtyard Anchorage Airport

Activity note: Getting on/off a bus. Light walking up to 1 mile possible over pavement and uneven terrain. Light walking and standing at both the SeaLife Center and Aviation Museum. Driving about 130 miles to Anchorage; approximately 3 hours with stops.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: After checking out of our hotel, a motorcoach will drop us at the Alaska SeaLife Center, a public aquarium and the state's only permanent marine mammal rehabilitation facility. The center was established after the Exxon-Valdez oil spill and as one of the only aquariums in the world with an on-site research facility, brings in top-notch researchers from all over the world. We'll have a chance to attend an presentation on a current research project. There will be time to explore the SeaLife Center's many exhibits, view the resident wildlife, and learn more about the Center's goals and continuing research.

Lunch: At the SeaLife Center.

Afternoon: We’ll board a motorcoach bound for Anchorage. Enjoy the scenery and dramatic shorelines as we travel on the Seward Highway along the Turnagain Arm. Keep an eye out for wildlife: if we are lucky, we might spot a beluga in the waters of the Arm, or dall sheep in the Chugach mountains above the road. Once we arrive, we'll head to the Alaska Aviation Museum, located on the the Lake Hood Seaplane Base, the largest float plane base in the world. A docent will lead an exploration of Alaska's colorful aviation history through the Museum's interactive displays and extensive collection. Afterward, the motorcoach will bring us to the hotel for check-in.

Dinner: At a local restaurant.

Evening: During the program wrap-up, we’ll tell stories and share favorite experiences from our time together in Alaska. We'll recount our explorations of Alaska by rail and describe the new knowledge that we'll take home to share with others. After wrap-up, the remainder of the evening is yours to explore Anchorage or prepare for departure in the morning.

DAY
11
Program Concludes
Anchorage
B

Activity note: Breakfast at your pace. Check out by 12:00 p.m. Hotel offers 24-hour airport shuttle service.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: Hotel checkout is at noon. The Courtyard Anchorage Airport offers a 24-hour courtesy airport shuttle service departing on the half hour, allowing you to head to the airport at your convenience. This concludes our program. If you are returning home, safe travels. If you are staying on independently, have a wonderful time. If you are transferring to another Road Scholar program, detailed instructions are included in your Information Packet for that program. We hope you enjoy Road Scholar learning adventures and look forward to having you on rewarding programs in the future. Don’t forget to join our Facebook page and follow us on Instagram. Best wishes for all your journeys!






Important registration tip:
If you want to attend the live lecture, please do not wait until the last minute to enroll.
If you enroll after a lecture is complete, we’ll send you a recording of the event.