2520
Arizona

Red Rocks & Rafting: Sedona & Grand Canyon With Your Grandchild

Alongside your grandchild, find adventure in Sedona’s Red Rocks and the Grand Canyon as you whitewater raft, explore hidden waterfalls and ride a helicopter for awe-inspiring views!
Rating (5)
Program No. 2520RSBLOG
Length
6 days
Starts at
1,699 / ADULT
1,199 / CHILD

At a Glance

The Grand Canyon is so gigantic that if you gathered together every single person on the planet and put them inside it — they would only fill a fraction of it! It’s hard to imagine how big this natural wonder is until you see it with your own eyes. Share a week with your grandchild you'll never forget at the majestic Grand Canyon and amid the spectacular red rock cliffs of Sedona. Experience the Grand Canyon with a trip to the bottom of the canyon on a remote rode on the Hualapai Reservation. Take part in an exciting 37-mile whitewater adventure in motorized rafts on the Colorado River and a helicopter flight to the rim as a finale!
Activity Level
Outdoor: No Sweat
Walking up to one mile on varied terrain. Getting in/out of rafts. Some bumpiness in open-air jeep ride. Elevations up to 7,000 feet.

Best of all, you'll ...

  • Experience the Grand Canyon’s beauty on a walk along the South Rim and a ride to the bottom of the canyon through the Hualapai Reservation.
  • Experience a 37-mile whitewater adventure in the Grand Canyon on a motorized raft.
  • Explore Sedona’s red rock country by jeep to see off-the-beaten-path sights, and get up close to local desert critters during a wildlife presentation!

General Notes

Program is for grandchildren ages 9-12. Children must be 9 years old for rafting/helicopter rides. Helicopters cannot fly in excessively hot and/or windy conditions for safety reasons. Although this happens very infrequently, it remains a possibility. In that event, the raft trip will be extended to a location where ground transportation can reach the group.
Featured Expert
All Experts
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Ken Mikell
Ken Mikell is part of a music duo with his wife, Lynn. They play a wide range of traditional music, with particular attention to the Celtic roots of cowboy music. Using harp, guitar, recorder, fiddle and harmonica, they animate and illuminate the music that followed the trail west. From old time trail songs to the golden era of the radio and silver screen cowboy, they have an extensive knowledge of the history of Western music and enjoy sharing it with audiences.

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

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Mikaela Ray
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Ken Mikell
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Ashley Hardy
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Margaret (Maggie) Mitchell
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Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Field Guide to the Grand Canyon
by Whitney, Stephen R
This book describes and illustrates the area's plants and animals, and offers fascinating in-depth information on the natural history and geology of this dramatic region. 272pp
Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water
by Reisner, Marc
The story of the American West is the story of a relentless quest for a precious resource: water. It is a tale of rivers diverted and dammed, of political corruption and intrigue, of billion-dollar battles over water rights, of ecologic and economic disaster. In Cadillac Desert Marc Reisner writes of the earliest settlers, lured by the promise of paradise, and of the ruthless tactics employed by Los Angeles politicians and business interests to ensure the city's growth. He documents the bitter rivalry between two government giants, the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, in the competition to transform the West. Based on more than a decade of research, Cadillac Desert is a stunning expose and a dramatic, intriguing history of the creation of an Eden--and Eden that may be only a mirage. 608pp
Volcanoes of Northern Arizona - Sleeping Giants of the Grand Canyon Region
by Duffield, Wendell A
Just south of the Grand Canyon lies a range of volcanic mountain including Mt. Humphreys, the highest point in Arizona. These mountains encompassing Sunset Crater and the San Francisco Peaks, collectively make up the San Francisco Volcanic Field. This book provides, for the first time, a popular look at the fiery origin of these volcanic features. With magnificent aerial photographs, original geologic illustrations, and detailed road logs to many of the key features, this book is an indispensable tool for the traveler, the educator, and all that are interested in the remarkable landscape of northern Arizona. 68pp
Living at the Edge: Explorers, Exploiters, and Settlers of the Grand Canyon Region
by Anderson, Michael F
A comprehensive look at the pioneer history of the Grand Canyon Region, from its earliest residents to the creation of the national park at the end of the pioneer era (circa 1920). Included are close to two hundred historic photographs, many never published before, and 12 custom maps of the region. 184pp
Secret Sedona: Sacred Moments in the Landscape
by Larry Lindahl
This book provides an overview of the terrain, ancestral Indian ruins and petroglyphs found in Sedona's wilderness areas. Extraordinary photography from one of the nations most photogenic areas. 80 pages.
An Introduction to Grand Canyon Ecology
by Houk, Rose
56pp
An Introduction to Grand Canyon Prehistory
by Coder, Christopher M.
People have inhabited Grand Canyon for the past twelve thousand years. Evidence of their lives exists throughout the canyon; but it is up to their ancestors and archaeologists to interpret those remains for us. This book provides a popular look at the architecture, art, and tools of prehistoric Puebloan peoples, as well as information about modern-day Native American tribes. With illustrations and color photographs.
Carving Grand Canyon: Evidence, Theories, and Mystery
by Ranney, Wayne
Ranney explains how rivers in general can physically carve canyons, looks chronologically at the numerous theories that have been presented by successive generations of geologists regarding the Grand Canyon's formation, and describes a plausible sequence of geologic events that could create such a landscape. Numerous color photographs, detailed illustrations, and maps are provided. Annotation ©2005 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR 160pp; 2nd edition 2012.
The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons
by Powell, John Wesley
Full text of Powell's 1,000-mile expedition down the fabled Colorado in 1869. Superb account of terrain, geology, vegetation, Indians, famine, mutiny, treacherous rapids, mighty canyons. 240 illustrations. 432pp
Grand Canyon: Time Below the Rim
by Craig Childs and Gary Ladd
Prepared by the Book Division of Arizona Highways magazine, this book is written and photographed by 2 of the leading authorities on the subject matter. There's no place on earth like the Grand Canyon, and there's no book about the Canyon like this one. "Grand Canyon: Time Below the Rim" connects you with remote sections of the Canyon most people will never see: the waterfalls, the streams, the thousands of side canyons, the prehistoric rock formations, the rock art and other remains of an ancient civilization, and the entire course of the Colorado River through the Canyon.
Half Broke Horses
by Walls, Jeannette
Jeannette Walls, author of The Glass Castle, wrote this true life novel which unfolds across Northern Arizona from the 1920s to the 1960s. Its heroine, Lily Casey Smith, (Ms. Wall's grandmother) battled the elements, prejudices, economic conditions and politics of remote frontier Arizona. Many of the locations described - Peach Springs, Seligman, Flagstaff, the Navajo Reservation, the Arizona Strip - are sites visited by NAU Road Scholar programs. Readers of this selection will feel the sense of heritage from this tale of life in our distant corner of America. Note: may not be appropriate for young readers.





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