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Virginia

From Colony to Revolution: Jamestown, Williamsburg, Yorktown

Program No. 2011RJ
Immerse yourself in historic Virginia with scholars, instructors and historians as you explore Colonial Era history from the founding of Jamestown to the end of the Revolutionary War.
Length
7 days
Rating (4.71)
Activity Level
Starts at
1,549

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DATES & starting prices
PRICES
May 7 - May 13, 2023
Starting at
1,549
Jun 4 - Jun 10, 2023
Starting at
1,549
Sep 17 - Sep 23, 2023
Starting at
1,549
Oct 1 - Oct 7, 2023
Starting at
1,549
Apr 14 - Apr 20, 2024
Starting at
1,549
May 19 - May 25, 2024
Starting at
1,549
Jun 2 - Jun 8, 2024
Starting at
1,549
Sep 29 - Oct 5, 2024
Starting at
1,549
Oct 27 - Nov 2, 2024
Starting at
1,549
DATES & starting prices
PRICES
May 7 - May 13, 2023
Starting at
1,889
Jun 4 - Jun 10, 2023
Starting at
1,889
Sep 17 - Sep 23, 2023
Starting at
1,889
Oct 1 - Oct 7, 2023
Starting at
1,889
Apr 14 - Apr 20, 2024
Starting at
1,939
May 19 - May 25, 2024
Starting at
1,939
Jun 2 - Jun 8, 2024
Starting at
1,939
Sep 29 - Oct 5, 2024
Starting at
1,939
Oct 27 - Nov 2, 2024
Starting at
1,939

At a Glance

Embark on a journey through Virginia’s “Historic Triangle” with no less than a dozen historians and other experts. Delve into Virginia society, from the establishment of the first successful British outpost at Jamestown in 1607 through the end of British rule only a few miles away at Yorktown in 1781. Traveling between these sites, pause to visit the Colonial capital in Williamsburg. Learn about the development of plantation society, slavery and the role of religion and events leading to the Siege of Yorktown. You'll also enjoy a unique tavern dining experience.
Activity Level
Keep the Pace
Walking up to two miles daily on brick, cobblestone and uneven ground.

Best of all, you’ll…

  • Relish an in-depth look with the head curator at the incredible Jamestown Rediscovery Project, where archaeology is uncovering the original fort.
  • Experience William & Mary's Wren Building and the historical Duke of Gloucester Street, heart of Colonial Williamsburg, with a knowledgeable interpreter.
  • Follow your instructor across the earthworks to the field where American independence was guaranteed by the surrender of Lord Cornwallis.

General Notes

For a shorter experience with more free time in this area, check out "Historic Triangle Sampler: Williamsburg, Jamestown & Yorktown" (#22991).
Featured Expert
All Experts
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Susan Kern
A former archaeologist at Monticello, Susan Kern is passionate about American history. In her current role, Susan is a Visiting Associate Professor in the history department of the College of William & Mary, and teaches for the National Institute of American History and Democracy (NIAHD), a program of courses in early American history, material culture, and museum studies. Her book, "The Jeffersons at Shadwell," won Virginia Historical Society's Richard Slatten Award for Excellence in Virginia Biography, and the Abbott Lowell Cummings Award from the Vernacular Architecture Forum. Susan holds an M.A. in architectural history from the University of Virginia, and a Ph.D. in history from William & Mary.

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

Profile Image of Susan Kern
Susan Kern View biography
A former archaeologist at Monticello, Susan Kern is passionate about American history. In her current role, Susan is a Visiting Associate Professor in the history department of the College of William & Mary, and teaches for the National Institute of American History and Democracy (NIAHD), a program of courses in early American history, material culture, and museum studies. Her book, "The Jeffersons at Shadwell," won Virginia Historical Society's Richard Slatten Award for Excellence in Virginia Biography, and the Abbott Lowell Cummings Award from the Vernacular Architecture Forum. Susan holds an M.A. in architectural history from the University of Virginia, and a Ph.D. in history from William & Mary.
Profile Image of Dean Shostak
Dean Shostak View biography
In 1991, Dean Shostak became involved in the revival of the rare and beautiful glass armonica, invented by Benjamin Franklin in 1761. Today, he is one of eight glass armonica players in the world, and the only musician since the 18th century to use a flywheel and foot treadle as Franklin originally designed. Dean began his musical career in Colonial Williamsburg at the age of 14, and after graduating from the University of Virginia, began to study 18th-century instruments such as the pocket violin and the hurdy-gurdy. He has now incorporated spectacular new and antique glass instruments into his show, including the glass violin and crystal handbells. Dean has emerged as a nationally acclaimed touring artist, and his music has been featured on numerous television and radio programs including Voice of America, The Weather Channel, The Discovery Channel, NPR's All Things Considered and Mister Rogers' Neighborhood.
Profile Image of Stephen Christoff
Stephen Christoff View biography
Stephen Christoff has been a musical fixture at Colonial Williamsburg for more than 15 years. Since 2006, he has performed his one-man show called "Seller of Songs" at the Hennage Theater in Colonial Williamsburg to sell-out audiences and rave reviews. In 2007, Stephen was a member of a collaborative performance team that played over 100 performances of "American Musicworks," a signature show designed for the Dewitt Wallace Galleries folk art exhibition, and also performed for the Jamestown 2007, Godspeed Sail and Landing Party Festival. He has headlined at locations including Mount Vernon, Chestertown Tea Party Festival, Virginia's Yorktown Celebration Festival, The National Portrait Gallery, The Library of Congress, The Black Swamp Arts Festival and Disney's Epcot Center.
Profile Image of Tom Marshall
Tom Marshall View biography
An instructor in the Music Department at the College of William and Mary for more than 20 years, Tom Marshall has been performing private concerts for Road Scholar participants at the historic Wren Chapel for many years. He has served for two decades as a harpsichordist for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation where he has performed numerous works of the concerto grosso style in original orchestrations, on original instruments. He is featured on many of the historical recordings issued by the foundation. A long-time member of the American Guild of Organists, he has served as organist for the Williamsburg United Methodist Church since 1977. Tom performs frequently with the Virginia Symphony, numerous baroque chamber ensembles, and organ and harpsichord recitals throughout the United States and Europe. He has made seven study tours in Europe to examine and play many surviving keyboard instruments from the 15th to the 19th century.
Profile Image of Bly Straube
Bly Straube View biography
As a member of the team of archaeologists who found the remains of James Fort, the site of America's 1607 birthplace, Bly Straube is renowned for her knowledge of our country's history. Since 1973, she has worked in the Williamsburg area as a historical archaeologist, first with the Virginia Department of Historic Resources and then as co-founder of the James River Institute for Archaeology. Bly has recorded many programs for the History Channel, the Discovery Channel, National Geographic, and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.
Profile Image of Anne Conkling
Anne Conkling View biography
A native of Pennsylvania with family roots deep in that state, Anne Conkling attended American University before finally settling in Williamsburg, Va. She has a passion for anything historical, particularly from the period 1500-1875. Her interests include colonial Virginia, the role of the Anglican Church in colonization, royal charters, political life cycles, and the roles of women of all races. Anne has written for various newspapers and publications, is a historical interpreter at Bruton Parish Church, and a teacher of historical interpreters at Jamestown Island.
Profile Image of Felicity Meza-Luna
Felicity Meza-Luna View biography
Felicity Meza-Luna currently serves as an American Indian interpreter for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Previously, she held the same position at Historic Jamestowne, site of the original first permanent English settlement in the New World and a point of First Contact. Felicity participates as a Jingle Dress Dancer at powwows around the region and is the Sergeant-at-Arms for the Inter-tribal Women's Circle. She is a member of the Lakota Tribe, Rosebud Reservation, and has family at the Pine Ridge Reservation.
Profile Image of Bunny Rich
Bunny Rich View biography
Bunny Rich has worked for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation for more than 40 years. Among her many interests, she has concentrated on Colonial family life, cooking, and clothing, often interpreting at the Powell House. Bunny also has served as a leader for VIP guests ranging from Bill Clinton to David Brinkley. A native of York County, Bunny can trace her roots on the Virginia Peninsula back to the 1630s.
Profile Image of Lee Rose
Lee Ann Rose View biography
Lee Ann Rose has found a way to use her theatre degree and her love of history into a career that has spanned 20 years at Colonial Williamsburg and now has allowed her to step out creating her own company called, Shades of Our Past. At her time at Colonial Williamsburg, she has played Martha Washington and coached other character interpreters and Nation Builders. When she is not performing, she is working on a book about Martha Washington's children.
Profile Image of Mary Griffith
Mary Griffith View biography
Mary Griffith, a chocolatier, has an MBA from Old Dominion University and started Virginia's Finest Chocolate while an undergraduate student at Christopher Newport University. Taking the Small Business Institute class, she created the business plan for Virginia's Finest Chocolate and carried it out. For more than 25 years, Mary has enjoyed sharing her love for all things chocolate with her handmade products and educational programs. Her products carry Virginia's Finest Trademark as awarded by the Virginia Department of Agriculture.
Profile Image of Kate Tilley
Kate Tilley View biography
A Pennsylvania native, Kate Tilley received a bachelor’s in theatre from DeSales University with concentrations in acting and costuming. In 2009, she turned her costuming attention to historical clothing in the colonial time period and began an internship with the tailors at Colonial Williamsburg. As a historic clothing technician at the Jamestown-Yorktown Foundation, Kate served as a mentor for new staff in the historical clothing services department, team leader for day-to-day activities at the Jamestown Settlement Costume Shop.
Profile Image of Mary Alie
Mary had a 34-year career in education as a classroom teacher, assistant principal and principal. Since retiring in 2001, Mary has worked as a schools and groups Interpreter for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. She has also served as an instructor for the Colonial Williamsburg’s Teacher Institute. Mary also serves as a costumed interpreter in Colonial Williamsburg’s original and restored homes and public buildings, such as the Governor’s Palace and the Colonial Capitol.
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, and Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia
by Brown, Kathleen
The Revolution in Virginia, 1775-1783.
by Selby, John E
Pocahontas’s People: The Powhatan Indians of Virginia through Four
by Rountree, Helen
A Land as God Made It: Jamestown and the Birth of America
by James Horn
Becoming Americans: Our Struggle to Be Both Free and Equal.
by Carson, Cary
A Revolutionary People at War: The Continental Army & American Character
by Royster, Charles
Jamestown: The Buried Truth
by Kelso, William
Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation
by Ellis, Joseph J
American Scripture: The Making of the Declaration of Independence
by „h Maier, Pauline.
American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia
by Morgan, Edmund S
Damned Souls in a Tobacco Colony
by Bond, Edward L.
Colonial Virginia-A History
by Billings, Warren M., John E. Selby and Thad W. Tate.
American Colonies
by Taylor, Alan
Plantation Homes of the James River.
by Roberts, Bruce.
Empires at War: The French and Indian War and the Struggle for North
by Fowler, William M.
Women’s Life and Work in the Southern Colonies
by Spruill, Julia Cherry
The Stamp Act Crisis: Prologue to the American
by Morgan, Edmund S. & Helen M. Morgan
Slave Counterpoint: Black Culture in the Eighteenth Century Chesapeake and
by Morgan, Philip
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7 days
6 nights
15 meals
6 B 5 L 4 D
DAY
1
Introduction to Williamsburg, Welcome Dinner, Orientation
Williamsburg
D
DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Williamsburg

Activity note: Hotel check-in from 4:00 p.m. If you arrive early, you may leave your luggage at the front desk.

Afternoon: Program Registration: After you have your room assignment, join us at the Road Scholar table to register with the program staff, get any up-updated information, and confirm the time and location of the Orientation session. If you arrive late, please locate your Group Leader and let them know you have arrived. Your program materials will be sent to you a few days before the program, digitally, through your roadscholar.org account. This includes your program itinerary, any related handouts, and restaurant/free time suggestions. Please plan to print them out and bring along to the program, utilize the hotel's business center to access them, or view them on your own personal electronic device. We begin our immersion in colonial and revolutionary Virginia with an expert presentation on Williamsburg. Learn about the town’s history from its beginnings when the colonial capital moved from Jamestown to Middle Plantation. Follow its growth through the 18th century to its height during the Revolution. Then trace its decline with the removal of the capital to Richmond, leaving little more than the College and the hospital for the insane. Finally gain an appreciation for its phoenix-like rise in the early 20th century thanks to vision of a local minister and the generosity of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., resulting in today’s treasure of colonial American interpretation.

Dinner: In our private dining area at the hotel.

Evening: Orientation: The Group Leader will greet everyone with a warm welcome and lead introductions. We will review the up-to-date program schedule and any changes, discuss roles and responsibilities, logistics, safety guidelines, emergency procedures including contact numbers for key staff, and answer any questions you may have. Indicated times are approximate; program activities and schedules may need to change due to local circumstances. In the event of changes, we will alert you as quickly as possible. Thank you for your understanding. Scheduled free time is reserved for your personal independent exploration. Please be aware that program activities, schedules, and personnel may need to change due to local circumstances. In the event of changes, we will alert you as quickly as possible. Thank you for your understanding. Continue getting to know your fellow participants, settle in, and get a good night’s rest for the day ahead.

DAY
2
Historic Jamestowne, Williamsburg's Indigenous Peoples
Williamsburg
B,L,D
DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Williamsburg

Activity note: This program includes significant physical activity. Today's field trip includes an extended walk of nearly a mile round trip; slightly rolling terrain, paved and gravel paths; quite a bit of standing, few resting places. Those who are concerned about the physical challenges can remain in the Visitor Center that offers both detailed exhibits and a fascinating "in the round" video of the Jamestown story. The dig site is about half way on the walk and the Archaearium is at the far end.

Breakfast: Breakfast buffet at the hotel

Morning: In an illustrated two-part presentation, an expert associated with Historic Jamestowne provides a fascinating, in-depth look at the incredible Jamestown Rediscovery Project that has been underway for more than 20 years. The site — where the first English settlers built a fort to establish a permanent settlement in North America — was long thought lost to erosion by the James River, but through the perseverance of a dedicated team of archaeologists it has slowly been revealing its incredible secrets. After a morning of classes, depart via motor coach for Historic Jamestowne.

Lunch: Enjoy lunch with your group onsite at Historic Jamestowne.

Afternoon: We begin our afternoon at the Visitor Center, where you can see a film and exhibits later on your own. Then, led by an expert, we will explore the site of the original fort and view the area now under investigation by archaeologists. Depending on the season, you may see members of the team actively working at the dig. Pass through the church tower — all that remains of the 17th century building — and sit in the cool interior of the reconstructed church. Gaze out over the James River and imagine the three small ships bobbing at anchor on the broad waterway. You will also have time to see many of the artifacts uncovered at the dig and exhibited in the architecturally unique Archaearium, with a "see-through" floor that lets you view the foundation of the 17th century statehouse.

Dinner: At the hotel

Evening: In our hotel classroom, we will learn about Williamsburg's indigenous peoples with an expert speaker, tracing their interactions with the government and settlers of early Virginia. Learn about the many different tribes with whom the colonists interacted as they moved farther and farther into the wilderness. Investigate the changing roles of the tribes as they negotiated not only with encroaching settlers, but also with other indigenous groups, and as war approached, with the competing factions among the colonists.

DAY
3
Slavery, 17th Century Lady, Jamestown Settlement
Williamsburg
B,L
DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Williamsburg

Activity note: The Settlement field trip includes an extended walk of nearly a mile down and back up a gently sloping hill. Those who wish can board one of the reconstructed ships via a gangway and investigate the decks by climbing steep, narrow stairs. Anyone preferring a less active experience can explore extensive galleries in the indoor museum; special exhibits on the second floor can be reached by elevator.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: Our first session today focuses on slavery in the 18th century. With a noted expert, we will examine the evolution of slavery from its introduction in the 17th century, from a form of indentured servitude to lifelong bondage. We will also consider the impact of the “peculiar institution” on families black and white, cultural influences brought to America from Africa, attitudes toward race in the colonial era including changes in laws that reflected and institutionalized the status of Africans in Virginia, and other facets of the lives of both masters and slaves. What better way to experience a different time than to meet someone who lived then? We will next engage in a conversation with a lady of the 17th Century, personified by a talented and knowledgeable costumed interpreter. You will quickly begin to feel that you are truly in the presence of an early colonist as she shares tales of triumphs, tragedies, and the mundane activities of daily life. Be prepared to share your own travel adventures and why you would have emigrated to this new colony on the edge of wilderness.

Lunch: Enjoy a box lunch on site with your group at Jamestown Settlement.

Afternoon: Following up on our Historic Jamestowne field trip, we’ll explore the adjacent Jamestown Settlement museum and its re-created early colonial environment. Here you will have opportunities to investigate exciting interactive exhibits in the newly renovated museum, stroll through a village of Eastern Woodland Indians, talk with “settlers” in the fort, and walk the decks of the three ships (replicas) that brought the first adventurers to Virginia in May of 1607. These reconstructed venues provide a colorful, compelling look at life in the early 17th century, illustrating the story you saw previously in artifacts and outlines at Historic Jamestown. You will have some free time at your own pace to see what interests you most, whether special exhibits, short films, or chatting with interpreters around the site.

Dinner: Dinner is on your own this evening. This meal has been excluded from your program cost to explore the local fare on your own or with new friends.

Evening: At leisure. Feel free to relax, spend time with new Road Scholar friends, or check out available activities from the information in your preparatory materials. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions and give directions.

DAY
4
Colonial Williamsburg Then & Now, Afro-Am. Music
Williamsburg
B,L,D
DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Williamsburg

Activity note: The Historic Area walk is about 1-1/2 miles in one direction with a good deal of standing; few opportunities for rest stops; level, pebbled streets, occasional benches along the way. For anyone concerned about the physical challenges, there is a bus available about half-way that stops a short block from the College. We will ride the motor coach to and from the Historic Area.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: As preparation for our extensive walking field trip, we will have an expert presentation highlighted by archival slides on Williamsburg before and after what is lovingly called the Restoration. The presenter herself grew up in the old town and lived through the amazing transformation that took place in the mid-20th century. She will discuss the physical changes that took place as well as the attitudes and reactions of locals. Learn more about the reinvention of Virginia’s old colonial capital from the Great Depression through World War II, the involvement and generosity of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., and the town’s continuing evolution.

Lunch: At the hotel.

Afternoon: Our field trip this afternoon will begin at the east end of the historic town, from which we will stroll down historic Duke of Gloucester Street, heart of Colonial Williamsburg. This walk will highlight some of the most interesting features of the Restored Area, including the reconstructed Capitol, Governor's Palace, homes, and tradesmen's shops. We will also view gardens, urban plantations, and even the Public Gaol (jail) for a thorough overview to guide your personal independent exploration on Day Five. The College of William and Mary is adjacent to Colonial Williamsburg. The last stop of the afternoon is the college’s Wren Building, oldest continuously used academic building in the country, built before the town existed, and the first building to be restored during the Restoration. Sit on the hard benches as the early students did and learn about a university education in the 18th century. We will finish with a visit to the Wren Chapel for a concert of period music on its 18th century pipe organ, one of the four oldest in the U.S., with an opportunity to learn about the instrument.

Dinner: At the hotel.

Evening: We gather for an evening of African-American music and storytelling. With a talented singer/storyteller, take a sweeping journey through several centuries of African-American cultural tradition as it evolves from its roots in Africa through transformation during years of indentured servitude and slavery to emancipation during the Civil War.

DAY
5
Colonial Performances, Tavern lunch, Free time
Williamsburg
B,L
DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Williamsburg

Activity note: Transportation via motorcoach to the tavern lunch. After lunch, those wishing to explore Colonial Williamsburg can opt to be dropped off there rather than returning to the hotel. During the afternoon free time, participants can walk as little or as much as they want in the Restored Area or explore other venues (no transportation provided).

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: We'll start our morning with another delightful costumed interpreter posing as a Woman of the Town, Jane Vobe. Mrs. Vobe will entertain you with tales of life in the colonial village, the impact of the revolutionary crisis, and the challenges to an independent woman. Next, we’ll enjoy the talents of an accomplished musician who was involved in the revival of the rare and beautiful glass armonica, invented by Benjamin Franklin in 1761. Today, he is one of eight glass armonica players in the world.

Lunch: At a colonial style tavern, we’ll enjoy a plated lunch of stew, Virginia ham biscuits, fruit salad, dessert, and beverages including coffee and tea. We’ll dine in 18th century fashion in this authentically reconstructed inn serving traditional Southern fare. The building, built in 1962, incorporates architectural salvage over 200 years old, including paneling from Carter's Grove Plantation. Transportation to/from the tavern will be by motorcoach.

Afternoon: Free Afternoon. Take this opportunity for personal independent exploration to see and do what interests you most. Please refer to the list of Free Time Opportunities. The Group Leader will be happy to offer suggestions and give directions. With your Colonial Williamsburg pass, you can independently explore what appeals to you most in the town. At the Colonial Williamsburg Visitor Center, accessible by shuttle, you can view the classic film “Story of a Patriot.” You are also free to visit other sites in the area on your own, or simply relax.

Dinner: This meal has been excluded from your program cost to explore the local fare on your own or with new friends.

Evening: At leisure.

DAY
6
Yorktown & Revolutionary War, Yorktown Battlefield & Museums
Williamsburg
B,L,D
DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Williamsburg

Activity note: Walking along the Yorktown earthworks requires balance and stamina because of the steep sides of the works. Those concerned about the physical challenges can explore the Visitor Center galleries until the group returns. The walk at Surrender Field is about half a mile round-trip. The American Revolution Museum is fully accessible, but the grounds include some hilly areas and rough paths.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: In an extended two-part class, receive an introduction to the course of the Revolutionary War in the Tidewater area, thereby setting the stage for our field trip to Yorktown. Hear from a military expert about army life and maneuvers during the war. Explore Washington's campaign, coordinated with movements of the French fleet, that trapped British Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown, leading to his surrender and eventually to American independence.

Lunch: At the hotel.

Afternoon: We will board a bus with our group leader and head to the battlefield where climactic events of 1781 unfolded. We will be able to get out and walk around for a closer look at siege lines to visualize the opposing forces facing off. At Surrender Field, imagine the defeated British turning over their arms to the victorious American and French forces as their military band (allegedly) played “The World Turned Upside Down” — surely an understatement as far as Lord Cornwallis was concerned! From the battlefield, we move on to the American Revolution Museum at Yorktown, with many period artifacts, immersive experiences, dioramas, interactive exhibits, and short films. We finish our field trip at the museum's recreated 1780s farm, complete with a house, kitchen, tobacco barn, crop fields, and herb and vegetable garden.

Dinner: Farewell dinner at a local restaurant to include salad, choice of entrée, dessert, and coffee, tea, or water. Additional beverages available for purchase.

Evening: Enjoy the talents of an accomplished musician as he introduces a variety of fascinating instruments typical of the Revolutionary era. Some will be familiar, but others may be quite a surprise.

DAY
7
Women's Roles, Colonial Chocolate Making
Williamsburg
B

Activity note: Hotel check-out is by 11:00 a.m.

Breakfast: At the hotel.

Morning: We will examine the status of women in the colonial era, very different than it is today, and not just because they could not vote. Explore the "sphere" in which 18th century women of all classes and colors were expected to function, centered on home and family. Learn about women's legal standing and how some enterprising ladies found ways around the restrictions of their time. Then to bring the week to a delicious end we’ll learn about the foods, tools, and techniques of colonial cooks as we participate in the concoction of a simple but delicious treat of the time under the instruction of a colonial foodways instructor. Not only will we get to assist with the preparation, we will enjoy a sample of this traditional holiday treat. This concludes our program. We hope you enjoy all your Road Scholar learning adventures and look forward to having you on rewarding programs in the future. We encourage you to join our Facebook page and share photos of your program. Visit us at www.facebook.com/rsadventures. Best wishes for all your journeys!






Important registration tip:
If you want to attend the live lecture, please do not wait until the last minute to enroll.
If you enroll after a lecture is complete, we’ll send you a recording of the event.