22443
Costa Rica
Birding in Northern Costa Rica: Tanagers to Toucans
If Spotted Woodcreepers and manakins are on your birding life list, join us for an exploration of northern Costa Rica! An estimated 894 avian species call this country home.
Program No. 22443RJ
Length
11 days
Starts at
2,299
Flights start at
455
Getting There
See travel details and required documents

At a Glance

What makes Costa Rica a paradise for enthusiastic birders? An unparalleled list of 600 avian species call this tropical nation home year round, while an estimated 294 species make an appearance during their annual migrations. Add to your birding life list as you join expert naturalists in Costa Rica’s northern habitats for explorations of the lowlands of Sarapiquí, the wetlands of Caño Negro National Park, the lush rainforests of Arenal Volcano National Park and a private refuge along the Gulf of Nicoya.
Activity Level
Outdoor: Spirited
Walking up to three miles daily over varied terrain and uneven trails. Extensive coach travel. Elevations of 3,700 feet.
Small Group
Small Group
Love to learn and explore in a small-group setting? These adventures offer small, personal experiences with groups of 10 to 24 participants.

Best of all, you'll ...

  • Search for Keel-billed Toucans and the endangered Great-green macaw at the La Selva Biological Field Station.
  • On a boat ride through the mangrove swamps in the Gulf of Nicoya, spot Mangrove Black Hawks and Mangrove Warblers.
  • Discover why Caño Negro is one of the few nesting spots for the endangered Jabiru Stork.

General Notes

Maximum group size for this program is 12. All Road Scholar birding programs have a maximum participant-to-instructor ratio of 14:1 in the field. We adhere to the American Birding Association’s Code of Ethics. Learn more at http://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html Due to the nature of this program, listening devices are not available.
Featured Expert
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Luis Vargas
Having been immersed in Costa Rica’s rainforest since he grew up in a rural town in the Sarapiqui region, Luis Vargas knows its flora and fauna very well. He has been involved in research at the La Selva field station, worked with a program that teaches children about the environment, and served as a local expert at jungle lodges. Luis has been leading Road Scholar programs since 2010 and enjoys learning as much from his participants as they learn from him.
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Luis Vargas
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