21296
Georgia

The Savannah Film Festival

Experience the splendor of Savannah and the creative wonders of the Savannah Film Festival. Enjoy panel discussions, screenings, lectures and downtown excursions.
Rating (5)
Program No. 21296RJ
Length
6 days
Starts at
1,649

At a Glance

Every year, amidst antebellum architecture and cobblestoned squares, Savannah, Georgia transforms into a bustling mecca for film buffs. The annual Savannah Film Festival showcases award-winning professionals and groundbreaking independent films from seasoned veterans and budding directors alike. Get insider access to their creative works with admittance to screenings, panel discussions and engaging lectures that show you firsthand what goes into the making of a film. Enjoy a total of ten films, with a feature film each night and opportunities to choose the films you want to see most during the day. Notable 2016 selections included Oscar nominated films "La La Land," "Manchester by the Sea," "Lion," and "Moonlight."
Activity Level
On Your Feet
Savannah is a walking city. Walking up to 2 miles daily to venues and events, some uneven sidewalk terrain.

Best of all, you'll ...

  • Attend premieres of six first-run and independent films (pre-chosen by the festival director) and receive four ticket vouchers to attend daytime screenings on your own.
  • Join in discussions with acclaimed and up and coming directors, actors, writers and producers during panel discussions.
  • Explore downtown Savannah with local experts and ample opportunities to take in the historic district’s homes and treasures.
Featured Expert
All Experts
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Lyn Warr, Group Leader
Lyn Warr is a South Georgia native who currently resides on St. Simons Island. She served as an educator for 28 years, is a seasoned domestic and international traveler and enjoys sailing, biking, reading and cooking. In addition to leading groups for Road Scholar, Lyn has served as a docent at the St. Simons Island Lighthouse and Maritime Museum at the Historic Coast Guard Station.

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

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Lyn Warr, Group Leader
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Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
New Moon Rising (St. Simons Trilogy) Book 2
by Eugenia Price
Horace Gould returns to St. Simons and wins the heart of lovely neighbor Deborah Abbott, who adores her Mr. Gould", despite the difference in their years. She is not concerned with his rumored past, but she is saddened by his lack of faith.
The Savannah College of Art and Design: Restoration of an Architectural Heritage (Images of America: Georgia)
by Connie Capozzola Pinkerton
In 1979, a small art college with 71 students opened its doors in a renovated 19th-century building in the urban heart of colonial Savannah, Georgia. One of the most historic cities on the eastern seaboard, Savannah is noted for its architectural treasures, urban forest and verdant squares, and for the unique 1733 city plan designed by General Oglethorpe. The campus fabric of the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) grew from the Romanesque revival Savannah Volunteer Guards Armory, designed by Boston architect William Gibbons Preston in 1892, to comprise some 60 rehabilitated historic structures situated within four historic districts. Currently, more than 6,200 students pursue their dreams in this wonderful setting.
Convergence: A Literary Arts Journal
by Savannah College of Art and Design (Author), John Valentine (Author), Teresa Griffis (Author)
The literary arts magazine for the Savannah College of Art and Design presents a spectrum of excellent written and visual work. This publication features the selected work of talented writers and artists who work at the college, as well as that of alumni, and three visiting poets from the Georgia Poetry Circuit.
Saving Savannah - The City and the Civil War
by Jacqueline Jones
In this masterful portrait of life in Savannah before, during, and after the Civil War, prize-winning historian Jacqueline Jones transports readers to the balmy, raucous streets of that fabled Southern port city. Here is a subtle and rich social history that weaves together stories of the everyday lives of blacks and whites, rich and poor, men and women from all walks of life confronting the transformations that would alter their city forever. Deeply researched and vividly written, Saving Savannah is an invaluable contribution to our understanding of the Civil War years.
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
by John Berendt
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil is a sublime and seductive reading experience. Brilliantly conceived and masterfully written, this enormously engaging portrait of a most beguiling Southern city has become a modern classic.Shots rang out in Savannah's grandest mansion in the misty,early morning hours of May 2, 1981. Was it murder or self-defense? For nearly a decade, the shooting and its aftermath reverberated throughout this hauntingly beautiful city of moss-hung oaks and shaded squares. John Berendt's sharply observed, suspenseful, and witty narrative reads like a thoroughly engrossing novel, and yet it is a work of nonfiction. Berendt skillfully interweaves a hugely entertaining first-person account of life in this isolated remnant of the Old South with the unpredictable twists and turns of a landmark murder case.
Slavery and Freedom in Savannah
by Daina Berry (Editor, Contributor), Leslie Harris (Editor, Contributor), Jonathan M. Bryant (Contributor), Bobby J. Donaldson (Contributor), Jacqueline Jones (Contributor), Timothy Lockleyby (Contributor), Susan O'Donovan (Contributor), Janice Sumler-Edmo
"Slavery and Freedom in Savannah" is a richly illustrated, accessibly written book modeled on the very successful "Slavery in New York," a volume Leslie M. Harris coedited with Ira Berlin. Here Harris and Daina Ramey Berry have collected a variety of perspectives on slavery, emancipation, and black life in Savannah from the city’s founding to the early twentieth century. Written by leading historians of Savannah, Georgia, and the South, the volume includes a mix of longer thematic essays and shorter sidebars focusing on individual people, events, and places.
Savannah: A History of Her People Since 1733
by Preston Russell (Author), Barbara Hines (Author)
Savannah: A History of Her People Since 1733 offers a chronological view of Savannah history, including period photogrpahs and sketches. If you are acquainted with Savannah, this book will help solidify your knowlegde. If you are new to Savannah or need to learn more about the city, the book will increase your knowledge.
Savannah Style: Mystery and Manners
by Susan Sully
Savannah is a city of mercurial history and enigmatic charms. Home to cotton barons, shipping magnates, antiques dealers, and tireless preservationists, it has helped define Southern elegance, manner, and style for more than two centuries. From the slightly faded grandeur of the Second Empire baroque Thomas Levy House, filled with antique maps, prints, books, and other curiosities, to the phantasmal, Proustian decor of the high style Greek Revival Knapp House, the 20 houses featured in this book express the city's alternating moods of decadence and decorum. Quite often, a serene exterior-- designed in a Georgian, federal, or restrained Greek Revival style-- will relinquish its polite composure to an ingenious play of interior whimsy or flight of decorative fancy. Elegant town houses designed by William Jay, John Ash, Isaiah Davenport, and William Gibbons Preston, gracious plantation manors, and unpretentious summer cottages are featured in detail in word and image. A delightful foreword by John Berendt acts as an informative addendum to Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil and an excellent introduction to this book.
St. Simons Trilogy
by Eugenia Price
A compelling, vibrant saga of conflict, love, and a young man's search to fulfill his dreams. In this enthralling first novel of the St. Simons Trilogy, Eugenia Price shares the compelling story of James Gould, a young man with a passionate dream. Raised in post-Revolution Granville, Massachusetts, Gould could only imagine the beauty and warmth of lands to the south. It was there that he longed to build bridges and lighthouses from his very own design and plans. The gripping story unfolds as Gould follows his dream to the raw settlement of Bangor on the Penobscot River, to St. Simons Island off the coast of Georgia, to lawless Spanish East Florida, and back—at last and finally—to St. Simons. Along the way, he encounters hardship, peril, failure, and success, but it is the unwavering love of Janie Harris, an especially beautiful and strong-willed young woman, that fulfills his deep need for someone who can share the dream and the life he has chosen.
Rebels, Saints, and Sinners: Savannah's Rich History and Colorful Personalities
by Timothy Daiss
Since its founding in 1733 by James Oglethorpe, the city of Savannah has experienced many triumphs and disasters. Its citizens have endured hurricanes, fires, and epidemics, and they have dealt successfully with social injustice and political corruption. Savannahians have also experienced both sides of war-winning as colonial rebels in the American Revolution and losing as Confederate patriots in the Civil War-and they have welcomed many heroes and stars to their city such as George Washington, Elvis Presley, and Shoeless Joe Jackson. In Rebels, Saints, and Sinners, Timothy Daiss tells the story of Savannah through captivating anecdotes about the city's past-a past full of intriguing characters and astonishing twists of fate. This book offers a wealth of detailed historical research presented in easily accessible prose, and it is a must-read for history buffs, travelers, educators, and anyone else interested in America's greatest cities.





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