Granite Gorge and Havasupai are some of the best-kept secrets in the Grand Canyon. Come hike these lesser-known wonders as you learn their story, from prehistory to today.
Rating (4.94)
Program No. 7704RSBLOG
Length
6 days
Starts at
1,849
6 days
5 nights
14 meals
5B 4L 5D
2
Western Grand Canyon Hike on Hualapai Reservation.
Grand Canyon Caverns/Peach Springs
4
Hike to Havasupai Waterfalls & Evening Lecture.
Supai (Havasupai Indian Reservation)
5
Havasupai Hike Out Day. Program Wrap up.
Grand Canyon Caverns/Peach Springs
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At a Glance

Explore one of the Grand Canyon’s most exquisite natural landmarks on foot. Hike on two of Arizona’s most remote Native American Reservations with an “off the beaten path” trek through Granite Gorge and to the famous Havasu Canyon and Supai Village. Venture through the canyon’s depth and breadth on foot with field-based and evening discussions focus on geology, ecology, regional prehistory, Native American heritage and current river and land management issues.
Activity Level
Outdoor: Challenging
Hike 5-8 miles daily over uneven terrain, high steps, desert vegetation, rocks, elevation changes up to 2,000 feet. Possible ankle-deep creek crossings. Elevations up to 5,200 feet.
Small Group
Small Group
Love to learn and explore in a small-group setting? These adventures offer small, personal experiences with groups of 10 to 24 participants.

Best of all, you'll ...

  • Drive a little-known road to the Colorado River at the bottom of the Grand Canyon for “off the beaten path” hiking amongst the pristine lower Sonoran Desert environments in Granite Gorge.
  • Spend two days on the Havasupai Reservation with explorations of the spectacular turquoise waters of Havasu, Mooney and Little Navajo Falls.
  • Naturalists share knowledge of the Grand Canyon environment and interpret its geologic, natural and human histories.
Featured Expert
All Experts
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Amy Calhoun
Amy Calhoun has been writing poetry, short stories and human interest pieces for local publications for nearly 35 years. She is an artist working with furniture and mixed media, pulling from her inspiration -- the great Southwest. Amy enjoys the outdoors as much as anything else she. She has spent time studying archeology and anthropology and enjoys working relationships and friendships with members of many Arizona tribes. She has raised three children and has two young granddaughters.

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

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Amy Calhoun
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Kristin Hooten
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Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
We are an Indian Nation: A History of the Hualapai People (First Peoples: New Directions in Indigenous Studies)
by Shepherd, Jeffrey P.
This book focuses on the historical construction of the Hualapai Nation in the face of modern American colonialism. Shepherd shows that Hualapai nation-building was a complex process shaped by band identities, competing visions of the past, creative reactions to modernity, and resistance to state power. He analyzes how the Hualapais transformed an externally imposed tribal identity through nationalist discourses of protecting aboriginal territory; and he examines how that discourse strengthened the Hualapais’ claim to land and water while simultaneously reifying a politicized version of their own history. Drawing on recent work in American Indian history and Native American studies, Shepherd shows how the Hualapai have strived to reclaim a distinct identity and culture in the face of ongoing colonialism.
Half Broke Horses
by Walls, Jeannette
Jeannette Walls, author of The Glass Castle, wrote this true life novel which unfolds across Northern Arizona from the 1920s to the 1960s. Its heroine, Lily Casey Smith, (Ms. Wall's grandmother) battled the elements, prejudices, economic conditions and politics of remote frontier Arizona. Many of the locations described - Peach Springs, Seligman, Flagstaff, the Navajo Reservation, the Arizona Strip - are sites visited by NAU Road Scholar programs. Readers of this selection will feel the sense of heritage from this tale of life in our distant corner of America.
Unquenchable: America's Water Crisis
by Glennon, Robert
In the middle of the Mojave Desert, Las Vegas casinos use billions of gallons of water for fountains, pirate lagoons, wave machines, and indoor canals. Meanwhile, the town of Orme, Tennessee, must truck in water from Alabama because it has literally run out. Robert Glennon captures the irony—and tragedy—of America’s water crisis in a book that is both frightening and wickedly comical. Unquenchable reveals the heady extravagances and everyday inefficiencies that are sucking the nation dry.
I Am the Grand Canyon: The Story of the Havasupai People
by Hirst, Stephen
I Am the Grand Canyon is the story of the Havasupai people. From their origins among the first group of Indians to arrive in North America some 20,000 years ago to their epic struggle to regain traditional lands taken from them in the nineteenth century, the Havasupai have a long and colorful history. The story of this tiny tribe once confined to a too small reservation depicts a people with deep cultural ties to the land, both on their former reservation below the rim of the Grand Canyon and on the surrounding plateaus. 276pp
The Secret Knowledge of Water
by Childs, Craig
Deserts are environments that can be inhospitable even to seasoned explorers. Craig Childs has spent years in the deserts of the American West, and his treks through arid lands in search of water reveal the natural world at its most extreme. This book is a very personal narrative about discovering not only the essence of water sources in arid lands but about the very soul of the place that contain these hidden treasures. A delightful read.
An Introduction to Grand Canyon Prehistory
by Coder, Christopher M.
People have inhabited Grand Canyon for the past twelve thousand years. Evidence of their lives exists throughout the canyon; but it is up to their ancestors and archaeologists to interpret those remains for us. This book provides a popular look at the architecture, art, and tools of prehistoric Puebloan peoples, as well as information about modern-day Native American tribes. With illustrations and color photographs.
The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons
by Powell, John Wesley
Full text of Powell's 1,000-mile expedition down the fabled Colorado in 1869. Superb account of terrain, geology, vegetation, Indians, famine, mutiny, treacherous rapids, mighty canyons. 240 illustrations. 432pp
Introduction to Grand Canyon Geology
by Price, L Greer
This overview of Grand Canyon geology is perfect for the first-time visitor or the seasoned Grand Canyon traveler. Chapters cover the basic priciples of geology, the history of geological exploration at Grand Canyon, the canyon's structural features, and the Colorado River. Includes over 70 photos and illustrations, an index, and glossary. 63pp





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