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24294
Online Program

Adventures Online: Women in Democracy

Trace the roles of women in democracy from the Women’s Suffrage Movement in Seneca Falls, N.Y. to the work of present-day legislators during this live, online learning adventure!
New
Program No. 24294RJ
Length
3 days
Starts at
349
Online Program

Adventures Online: Women in Democracy

Trace the roles of women in democracy from the Women’s Suffrage Movement in Seneca Falls, N.Y. to the work of present-day legislators during this live, online learning adventure!
Length
3 days
Starts at
349
Program No. 24294 RJ
Prefer to enroll or inquire by phone? 800-454-5768
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DATES & PRICES

Online Program
Details
Accommodation Details
Learn from the comfort of your own home.

DATES & PRICES

Online Program
Details
Accommodation Details
Learn from the comfort of your own home.

At a Glance

From the work of Susan B. Anthony in the Women’s Suffrage Movement to laws passed by present-day female legislators, the role of women in democracy has changed significantly in the United States. Join historians and a legislator for an immersive look into women’s roles in democracy during this live, online learning adventure. Enjoy a virtual field trip to the home of Susan B. Anthony in Seneca Falls, N.Y. to explore her work and legacy as an American Suffragist, and learn why the Seneca women served as an example to the Suffrage Movement during a virtual exploration of the Seneca Arts and Culture Center. Meet Latha Mangipudi, a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, for a look into her life and experiences as an elected official. Join a historian for an examination of the life of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, and enjoy a costumed interpretation that introduces you to Fannie Lou Hamer, the co-founder and vice-chair of the Freedom Democratic Party. Get to know your fellow Road Scholars as you discuss the work and successes of determined women who have changed the face of democracy in the U.S.

Best of all, you’ll…

  • Join experts from the Susan B. Anthony House for a virtual exploration of her home and learn about her work and legacy in the Women’s Suffrage movement.
  • Meet Latha Mangipudi, a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, to hear about her life and her experience as a female legislator.
  • Enjoy a costumed interpretation that offers an opportunity to “meet” Fannie Lou Hamer, the co-founder and vice-chair of the Freedom Democratic Party, which she represented at the 1964 Democratic National Convention.

General Notes

You’ll enjoy 2-3 hours of daily instruction, discussion and/or field trips, which includes sufficient breaks throughout the program. Please review the daily itinerary for start and end times to ensure you won’t miss a minute of this live experience. This online program is through Zoom, an easy-to-use web video service that includes closed captioning. All you need is an Internet connection and your computer. We’ll provide a how-to guide to make sure you’ll have a hassle-free experience. This session is offered live only and will not be available on demand.
Featured Expert
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Linda Lopata
Linda Lopata is the Director of Interpretation and Guest Services at the National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House. She manages programs to reflect contemporary issues and to challenge guests, students, and volunteers to think what the words liberty, justice, equality, and humanity mean to them. Linda holds a Masters degree in education from Nazareth College and was a special education teacher in the Rochester City School District for twenty years. She also earned a Master’s degree in Public History from the College at Brockport.

Please note: This expert may not be available for every date of this program.

Profile Image of Shirley Scott
Shirley Scott View biography
Shirley Scott attended Monroe Community College and SUNY Brockport. She worked at the New York State Department of Developmental Services before retiring and is now a reenactor and storyteller. She is a member of the Akwaaba Heritage Associates and Blackstorying League of Rochester. Shirley has portrayed Anna Murray Douglass and Fannie Lou Hamer along with others whose stories are unknown. She believes our history is important and that we must share that history with others. Everyone has a story and every story must be told.
Profile Image of Jaime Johnson
Jaime Johnson View biography
Jamie Johnson calls the nation’s capital home. She has been a professional guide with expertise in founding era American History and has led educational programs there since her relocation from the Midwest more than a decade ago. Jamie holds graduate degrees in American Studies and Legislative Affairs from Georgetown University. She is passionate about the revolutionary ideas that gave birth to a nation, and more importantly, the people who continually shape America with their aspirations to make it anew.
Profile Image of Linda Lopata
Linda Lopata View biography
Linda Lopata is the Director of Interpretation and Guest Services at the National Susan B. Anthony Museum and House. She manages programs to reflect contemporary issues and to challenge guests, students, and volunteers to think what the words liberty, justice, equality, and humanity mean to them. Linda holds a Masters degree in education from Nazareth College and was a special education teacher in the Rochester City School District for twenty years. She also earned a Master’s degree in Public History from the College at Brockport.
Visit the Road Scholar Bookshop
You can find many of the books we recommend at the Road Scholar store on bookshop.org, a website that supports local bookstores.
Women Will Vote: Winning Suffrage in New York State
by Susan Goodier and Karen Pastorello
Women Will Vote celebrates the 2017 centenary of women’s right to full suffrage in New York State. Susan Goodier and Karen Pastorello highlight the activism of rural, urban, African American, Jewish, immigrant, and European American women, as well as male suffragists, both upstate and downstate, that led to the positive outcome of the 1917 referendum. Goodier and Pastorello argue that the popular nature of the women’s suffrage movement in New York State and the resounding success of the referendum at the polls relaunched suffrage as a national issue. If women had failed to gain the vote in New York, Goodier and Pastorello claim, there is good reason to believe that the passage and ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment would have been delayed. Women Will Vote makes clear how actions of New York’s patchwork of suffrage advocates heralded a gigantic political, social, and legal shift in the United States. Readers will discover that although these groups did not always collaborate, by working in their own ways toward the goal of enfranchising women they essentially formed a coalition. Together, they created a diverse social and political movement that did not rely solely on the motivating force of white elites and a leadership based in New York City. Goodier and Pastorello convincingly argue that the agitation and organization that led to New York women’s victory in 1917 changed the course of American history.
America’s Women: 400 Years of Dolls, Drudges, Helpmates and Heroines (P.S.)
by Gail Collins
America's Women tells the story of more than four centuries of history. It features a stunning array of personalities, from the women peering worriedly over the side of the Mayflower to feminists having a grand old time protesting beauty pageants and bridal fairs. Courageous, silly, funny, and heartbreaking, these women shaped the nation and our vision of what it means to be female in America.
African American Women and the Vote, 1837-1965
by Ann D. Gordon
Written by leading scholars of African American and women's history, the essays in this volume seek to reconceptualize the political history of black women in the United States by placing them "at the center of our thinking." The book explores how slavery, racial discrimination, and gender shaped the goals that African American women set for themselves, their families, and their race and looks at the political tools at their disposal. By identifying key turning points for black women, the essays create a new chronology and a new paradigm for historical analysis. The chronology begins in 1837 with the interracial meeting of antislavery women in New York City and concludes with the civil rights movement of the 1960s. The contributors focus on specific examples of women pursuing a dual ambition: to gain full civil and political rights and to improve the social conditions of African Americans. Together, the essays challenge us to rethink common generalizations that govern much of our historical thinking about the experience of African American women.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton: An American Life
by Lori D. Ginzberg
In this subtly crafted biography, the historian Lori D. Ginzberg narrates the life of a woman of great charm, enormous appetite, and extraordinary intellectual gifts who turned the limitations placed on women like herself into a universal philosophy of equal rights. Few could match Stanton's self-confidence; loving an argument, she rarely wavered in her assumption that she had won. But she was no secular saint, and her positions were not always on the side of the broadest possible conception of justice and social change. Elitism runs through Stanton's life and thought, defined most often by class, frequently by race, and always by intellect. Even her closest friends found her absolutism both thrilling and exasperating, for Stanton could be an excellent ally and a bothersome menace, sometimes simultaneously. At once critical and admiring, Ginzberg captures Stanton's ambiguous place in the world of reformers and intellectuals, describes how she changed the world, and suggests that Stanton left a mixed legacy that continues to haunt American feminism.
Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom
by Catherine Clinton
Celebrated for her courageous exploits as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, Harriet Tubman has entered history as one of nineteenth-century America's most enduring and important figures. But just who was this remarkable woman? To John Brown, leader of the Harpers Ferry slave uprising, she was General Tubman. For the many slaves she led north to freedom, she was Moses. To the slaveholders who sought her capture, she was a thief and a trickster. To abolitionists, she was a prophet. Now, in a biography widely praised for its impeccable research and its compelling narrative, Harriet Tubman is revealed for the first time as a singular and complex character, a woman who defied simple categorization.
Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women’s Rights Movement
by Sally McMillen
In the quiet town of Seneca Falls, New York, over the course of two days in July, 1848, a small group of women and men, led by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, held a convention that would launch the women's rights movement and change the course of history. In Seneca Falls and the Origins of the Women's Rights Movement, Sally McMillen reveals, for the first time, the full significance of that revolutionary convention and the enormous changes it produced. The book covers 50 years of women's activism, from 1840 to 1890, focusing on four extraordinary figures--Mott, Stanton, Lucy Stone, and Susan B. Anthony. McMillen tells the stories of their lives, how they came to take up the cause of women's rights, the astonishing advances they made during their lifetimes, and the far-reaching effects of the work they did. At the convention they asserted full equality with men, argued for greater legal rights, greater professional and education opportunities, and the right to vote--ideas considered wildly radical at the time. Indeed, looking back at the convention two years later, Anthony called it "the grandest and greatest reform of all time.
Susan B Anthony: Biography of a Singular Feminist
by Kathleen Barry
Barry, noted feminist sociologists and author of, Female sexual slavery, offers an enlightening biography of perhaps the most unconventional woman of her century. By drawing upon letters, diaries, and other documents, she integrates Anthony's personal story into the political, economic, and cultural milieu of 19th c. America.





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