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Intergenerational: Generations Serving the Wild Lands of the Tetons

Program Number: 16168RJ
Start and End Dates:
7/20/2014 - 7/25/2014; 7/19/2015 - 7/24/2015;
Duration: 5 nights
Location: The Tetons (Jackson), Wyoming
Price starting at: $775.00 - Price may vary based on date, departure city
Program Type: Intergenerational; Service Learning
Intergenerational
Activity Level: n (see description)
Meals: 15; 5 Breakfasts, 5 Lunches, 5 Dinners    
Meal Options: Low Fat; Vegetarian; Low Salt    

Program intended for grandchildren from 8 - 18 years of age.

Make a difference for wildlife in the Tetons! Learn about bison, wolves, elk, moose, eagles, pronghorn and other wildlife while enhancing their habitats. You and your family can take pride in stewardship projects that will impact different locations in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Past projects have included restoring wetlands and nesting areas for native waterfowl and protecting willows from overbrowsing from moose. You will assist with a national bird-banding research project and meet wildlife biologists. All generations are welcome.




Highlights

• Work with non-profit and government groups to undertake projects such as clearing a path for migratory birds by removing fences and invasive species, as well as landscape and planting projects.
• Journey by canoe on a pristine glacial lake in Grand Teton National Park in front of the majestic Teton Mountains.
• Learn about the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem from an experienced naturalist and observe many large mammals in their natural habitats.



Activity Particulars

Hiking up to two miles to reach work site. Work may require lifting up to 20 pounds. Site elevation of 6,200 feet.



Coordinated by Teton Science Schools.




The Tetons (Jackson)

Awe-inspiring Grand Teton National Park reflects the ecological diversity of the Teton Range. Towering peaks rise 7000 feet from the valley floor, reflecting the majestic beauty of the Teton Ecosystem that includes wildlife such as elk, grizzly bear and moose. The historic town of Jackson is home to the National Museum of Wildlife Art.



Accommodations
Comfortable dormitory-style rooms with private baths.
Meals and Lodgings
   Teton Science Schools Jackson Campus
  Jackson, WY 5 nights
 Teton Science Schools Jackson Campus
Type: Lodge
  Description: From the highway at the base of Vogel's Hill, all you can see is a road disappearing into the contour of the land. But beyond that lies so much more: The Jackson Campus of Teton Science Schools is busy servicing the educational needs of school children, teachers-in-learning and students of nature young and old, while maintaining and enhancing conservation easements on all but two percent of nearly 900 acres. Carefully integrated into the landscape are two residential lodges, five educational buildings, dining hall, maintenance building and welcome center. Built in 2004, all buildings were designed from a green perspective, using high-performance materials with low-level organic compounds and using minimal resources. Natural lighting and innovation in space design have resulted in an environment that benefits all who live, work and visit here. Ongoing ecological work at the campus specializes in field science experiences within the suburban-rural interface and human-use impacts on our natural communities. Our Jackson Campus has accommodated as many as 300 person events, including educational and wildlife conferences, teaching and professional development workshops and conferences, luncheons, board meetings, community events and weddings.
  Contact info: 700 Coyote Canyon Road
Jackson, WY 83001 USA
phone: 307-733-1313
web: www.tetonscience.org
  Room amenities: Rooms are located in our lodges and provide a clock radio, linens, private bathroom and small chair. Living room areas for social gathering in the same building on the first floor.
  Facility amenities: The Jackson Campus has laundry facilities, phones on all floors of the lodges, wireless internet access from all buildings, coffee, tea and snacks available all day, private bathrooms and on-site dining lodge with exceptional food service from our executive chef.
  Smoking allowed: No
  Elevators available: Yes
  Additional nights prior: $80.00 Please call for availability, 307-734-3750.
  Check in time: 3:00 PM
  Additional nights after: $80.00 Please call for availability, 307-734-3750.
  Check out time: 1:00 PM


Travel Details
  Start of Program:
Check-in begins at 3 PM. You will be staying at Teton Science Schools Jackson Campus that night.
  End of Program:
Program ends after lunch at 1 PM. You will be staying at Teton Science Schools Jackson Campus the night before.
  Required documents:
The Road Scholar Health & Safety Form is required. Participants must sign Teton Science Schools risk/release liability waiver and a supplemental health form.
  Parking availability:
Free parking on site a short distance from the lodges.
Transportation
To Start of Program
  Location:  Jackson, WY
  Nearest city or town:  Jackson, WY
  Nearest highway: WY State Hwy 22
  Nearest airport:  Jackson Hole (JAC)
  From End of Program
  Location: Jackson, WY
    (Additional transportation information same as above)
Travel Details
 

Jackson Campus

 

From Airport

 
 

Service:

 

Taxi
Teton Taxi
phone: 307-733-1506

 

Per Person/One Way:

 

$45
Prices are subject to change.

 

Travel Time:

 

30 minutes 

 

Distance:

 

15 miles

 

Jackson Campus

 

From Airport

 
 

Service:

 

Taxi
Old West Transportation
phone: 307-690-8898

 

Per Person/One Way:

 

$45
Prices are subject to change.

 

Travel Time:

 

30 minutes 

 

Distance:

 

15 miles

 

Jackson Campus

 

From Airport

 
 

Service:

 

Taxi
Taxi Tim
phone: 307-690-4141

 

Per Person/One Way:

 

$45
Prices are subject to change.

 

Travel Time:

 

30 minutes 

 

Distance:

 

15 miles

 

Jackson Campus

 

From Airport

 
 

Service:

 

Commercial Van/Shuttle
Alltrans, Inc.
phone: 307-733-3135
Advanced Reservations Required

 

Per Person/One Way:

 

$16
Prices are subject to change.

 

Travel Time:

 

30 minutes 

 
Driving Directions
  From Dubois, Hoback Junction or Idaho FROM THE NORTH: Follow HWY 89/191 south to the Jackson Town Square. Turn right at the square onto Broadway. Continue 1.5 miles on Broadway to the US 89/191 and HWY 22 intersection (Albertsons & Jackson State Bank on your left). Turn right onto HWY 22. Head west on HWY 22 for approx. 1.7 miles. Watch for the Teton Science Schools sign on the right at Coyote Canyon Road. Turn right onto Coyote Canyon Road. Follow Coyote Canyon Road .6 miles to the Jackson Campus. FROM THE SOUTH: Follow HWY 89/191 north to the US 89/191 and HWY 22 intersection (Albertsons on your right side). Turn left at the light onto HWY 22. Proceed on HWY 22 for approx. 1.7 miles. Watch for the Teton Science Schools sign on the right at Coyote Canyon Road. Turn right on Coyote Canyon Road and follow it .6 miles to the Jackson Campus. FROM THE WEST: Follow HWY 22 (from Teton Pass) east to the town of Wilson. Stay on HWY 22. You will reach the HWY 390 junction after approx. 1.5 miles. Continue on HWY 22. Travel approx. 2.4 miles past the HWY 390 junction. Watch for the Teton Science Schools sign on the left at Coyote Canyon Road. Turn left onto Coyote Canyon Road and follow it 0.6 miles to the Jackson Campus.
  From State Highway 89 Travel to Jackson, Wyoming. Take Highway 22 out of Jackson (to the west), travel one mile to campus.
Elevation Note: Site elevation is 6,200 feet above sea level.

Equipment Requirements: Participants may want to bring water shoes with them for the boating activities, but closed toed shoes will be needed for non-water activities. All canoeing equipment will be provided by Teton Science Schools.
The prices listed for commercial services and facilities that are not included in the program cost, such as airport shuttles or extra nights lodging, are subject to change without notice. Since Road Scholar cannot guarantee the accuracy of these prices, we strongly suggest contacting the companies directly for the most up-to-date information.


Daily Schedule

Day 1: Check-in and move into lodging; orientation and introductions following dinner.
(Sunday, July 20)
   
 Arrive To: Check-in for the program is 3pm to 5pm Mountain Time.
 Dinner: Dinner will be served in our Dining Lodge at 5:30pm by our executive chef. The menu varies greatly and is always healthy and balanced.
 Evening: This week is designed with generations in mind. Projects chosen for the week will have grandparents and grandchildren working together on common goals on rewarding tasks that draw upon the strengths and energies of each generation. All of these projects are designed by Teton Science Schools for our participants, servicing public and private lands and organizations such as Grand Teton National Park, the Jackson Hole Widllife Foundation and Jackson Hole Land Trust. This evening will give us a chance to get to know each other and the facility as we prepare for our week ahead. This is also a time for the group to review the projects for the week, noting additional opportunities and changes due to the timing and needs of the tasks.
   
Accommodations: Teton Science Schools Jackson Campus
Meals Included: Dinner

Day 2: Service project in morning, hike in Grand Teton National Park in the afternoon. Evening program - Communication Chaos
(Monday, July 21)

Note: The hike today will be approximately 3 miles round-trip with 300 feet elevation gain. The service project may be moderately strenuous; it has yet to be determined.



   
 Breakfast: Hot breakfast with cereals, granola, oatmeal, fresh fruit, etc.
 Morning: This morning the group will depart to begin work on the service projects for the week. The projects will develop as time draws closer to the program. Teton Science Schools works with a variety of non-profit and government agencies in Jackson Hole. Some possible organizations we might work with are Grand Teton National Park, the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance, Wyoming Wetlands Society, US Forest Service or the Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation. We might also complete projects on Teton Science Schools' 880 acre property which serves as a migration path and home to many animals both large and small. Projects often include barbed wire fence removal, restoration of historic buildings, landscape and planting projects or invasive species removal.
 Lunch: Lunch will be a packed field lunch. Each participant will get to make their own sandwich and pack what they like.
 Afternoon: This afternoon will take us to Phelps Lake in the Laurence S. Rockefeller Preserve in the south end of Grand Teton National Park. Until recently, these lands were off limits to visitors as they were part of the Rockefeller family's private ranch. However, in 2007, the Rockefeller family donated the ranch and all of the surrounding lands. All visitors to Grand Teton National Park are now allowed to enjoy and explore this amazing piece of property. We will hike to Phelps Lake, a glacially carved gem at the base of Prospectors Mountain.
 Dinner: Dinner will be served in our Dining Lodge by our executive chef. The menu varies greatly and is always healthy and balanced.
 Evening: This evening will feature games and challenges built to connect the group as a whole. Grandparents and grandchildren will work together to figure out creative solutions to group initiatives.
   
Accommodations: Teton Science Schools Jackson Campus
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Day 3: Service project in Grand Teton National Park followed by hike in Grand Teton National Park or Bridger-Teton National Forest.
(Tuesday, July 22)

Note: Approximately 1 mile walk on flat ground to project site. This afternoon hike will be approximately 3-4 miles round-trip with elevation gains of up to 500 feet.



   
 Breakfast: Hot Breakfast with cereals, granola, oatmeal, fresh fruit, etc.
 Morning: This morning the group will depart to begin work on the service projects for the week. The projects will develop as time draws closer to the program. Teton Science Schools works with a variety of non-profit and government agencies in Jackson Hole. Some possible organizations we might work with are Grand Teton National Park, the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance, Wyoming Wetlands Society, US Forest Service or the Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation. We might also complete projects on Teton Science Schools' 880 acre property which serves as a migration path and home to many animals both large and small. Projects often include barbed wire fence removal, restoration of historic buildings, landscape and planting projects or invasive species removal.
 Lunch: Lunch will be a packed field lunch. Each participant will get to make their own sandwich and pack what they like.
 Afternoon: This afternoon in the field will allow us to get away from the roads and crowds and deeper into nature. Learn about and explore the plants and animals that inhabit the different ecosystems of Jackson Hole. Field naturalist techniques will be taught as the group journeys to lesser-known locations in the Bridger-Teton National Forest or Grand Teton National Park.
 Dinner: Dinner will be served in our Dining Lodge by our executive chef. The menu varies greatly and is always healthy, balanced and delicious.
 Evening: This evening will be a seasonal activity or expert-led lecture, to be determined.
   
Accommodations: Teton Science Schools Jackson Campus
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Day 4: Service project followed by Canoeing on String Lake in Grand Teton National Park. Free evening in downtown Jackson.
(Wednesday, July 23)

Note: Canoeing will require paddling and stepping in and out of canoes.



   
 Breakfast: Breakfast will consist of oatmeal, eggs, bacon, french toast, fruits, yogurt, granola, etc.
 Morning: This morning the group will depart to begin work on the service projects for the week. The projects will develop as time draws closer to the program. Teton Science Schools works with a variety of non-profit and government agencies in Jackson Hole. Some possible organizations we might work with are Grand Teton National Park, the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance, Wyoming Wetlands Society, US Forest Service or the Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation. We might also complete projects on Teton Science Schools' 880 acre property which serves as a migration path and home to many animals both large and small. Projects often include barbed wire fence removal, restoration of historic buildings, landscape and planting projects or invasive species removal.
 Lunch: Lunch will be a packed field lunch. Each participant will get to make their own sandwich and pack what they like.
 Afternoon: After the service is completed by lunch, participants will be treated to one of the most beautiful canoeing experiences of their lives on String Lake in Grand Teton National Park. Instructions on canoeing techniques and safety procedures will be provided as well as all equipment needed. String Lake is a pristine glacial body of water that sits at the base of Teewinot Mountain. Float along with your family while you enjoy spectacular scenery and fun on the water!
 Dinner: Dinner will be served in our Dining Lodge by our executive chef. The menu varies greatly and is always healthy and balanced.
 Evening: This will be a free evening for each family to rest or head into town to see the sights or take part in the Jackson Hole Rodeo. For those who would enjoy independent exploration, a shuttle to and from downtown Jackson will be provided by Teton Science Schools.
   
Accommodations: Teton Science Schools Jackson Campus
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Day 5: Bird Banding Service Project at the Conservation Research Center of the Teton Science Schools, followed by Macroinvertebrate Exploration in a local creek
(Thursday, July 24)
   
 Breakfast: Hot breakfast with cereals, granola, oatmeal, fresh fruit, etc.
 Morning: The group will depart for Teton Science Schools' Conservation Research Center property. The Conservation Research Center is home to a MAPS national bird banding research project. This program involves wildlife researchers capturing songbirds in mist nets, identifying species as they collect data for the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship program. During this time, participants will have the opportunity to follow the researchers as they check the mist nets and extract birds from them and then watch as the researchers process the birds by collecting data such as gender, age and health status. Participants will then have the opportunity to release the birds back into the wild.
 Lunch: Lunch will be a packed field lunch. Each participant will get to make their own sandwich and pack what they like.
 Afternoon: This afternoon we will investigate the waters of of a local creek and look at the creatures living underneath the rocks. Macroinvertebrates are tiny microorganisms that live under rocks in streams and rivers and provide a food source for many species as well as indicate the health of the stream. This activity will give grandparents and their grandchildren probably their first glimpse of the alien-like creatures and a chance to get in the stream and kick up rocks and mud.
 Dinner: Dinner will be served in our Dining Lodge by our executive chef. The menu varies greatly and is always healthy and balanced.
 Evening: Wildlife of Jackson Hole specimen display and interpretive talk. Learn about the amazing species that inhabit the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem as well as the strategies and adaptations that they employ in order to survive in this often harsh environment. Hold and touch fur, antlers, horns and bones of many different species.
   
Accommodations: Teton Science Schools Jackson Campus
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Day 6: Closing activities. Hands to Work. National Museum of Wildlife Art. Good-Byes.
(Friday, July 25)
   
 Breakfast: Hot breakfast with cereals, granola, oatmeal, fresh fruit, etc.
 Morning: After breakfast, all participants will take part in "hands-to-work." Hands-to-work is a part of Teton Science Schools' community philosophy. Participants along with staff will address and clean the spaces they have used throughout the week. All participants of Teton Science Schools' programs take part in this which builds a sense of community and rapport amongst program participants throughout the campus. A group that eats, sleeps and cleans up after itself together is stronger and closer. After hands-to-work, there will be a closing ceremony which will draw a close to the program and give us a chance to look back at the fun times we had through the week. The remainder of the morning will be spent at the National Museum of Wildlife Art. Adults will get a docent tour to learn in depth about the art that is on display while an educational program for the youth will include a variety of fun and interactive activities to learn about and appreciate art on their own levels. Then, families can enjoy the art either together or at their own speeds independently.
 Lunch: Program will end after lunch at the Rising Sage Cafe at the National Museum of Wildlife Art.
   
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch

Free Time Opportunities
 
  Jackson, WY Jackson Hole Info
  Wyoming Tourist Info
For additional information, visit www.wyomingtourism.org/
Important information about your itinerary: Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the information featured on this website. Itineraries are based on our best information at this time. Circumstances beyond our control may require us to adjust itineraries or other details. We regret any inconvenience this may cause and appreciate your understanding. Information will be sent to you from your Program Provider approximately three weeks prior to the program start date. The prices listed for commercial services and facilities that are not included in the program cost, such as airport shuttles or extra nights lodging, are subject to change without notice. Since Road Scholar cannot guarantee the accuracy of these prices, we strongly suggest contacting the companies directly for the most up-to-date information.

Suggested Reading List


The Natural World of Jackson Hole: An Ecological Primer


Author: Tim Clark


Description: An introduction to the natural world of Jackson Hole and to the principles of ecology as they operate in the valley.



Along the Ramparts of the Tetons: The Saga of Jackson Hole, Wyoming


Author: Robert E. Betts


Description: The magnificent valley of Jackson Hole at the base of the soaring Teton Range has long been a stage on which a remarkable series of events has been acted out by an equally remarkable cast of characters. This is that story, told with a verve and excitement which brings the past alive.



Windows into the Earth, the Geologic Story of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks


Author: Lee J. Siegel and Robert B. Smith


Description: A geologic history and tour of the northern Rockies, particularly Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Park.



Legacy of the Tetons: Homesteading in Jackson Hole


Author: Candy Vyvey Moulton


Description: This second edition of Legacy of the Tetons is a narrative of the bravery, love, heartbreak, joy, and fortitude of the early pioneers. Candy Moulton shares the struggles of those who lived and died on the land—some of whom came on foot in the Mormon Handcart Migration and established the settlement known today as Mormon Row.



A Naturalist’s Guide to Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks


Author: Frank C. Craighead Jr.


Description: A memoir and classic natural history of the wildlife of Jackson Hole and the Tetons by a celebrated local biologist, organized week-by-week throughout the year.



Plants of the Rocky Mountains


Author: Kershaw, MacKinnon, Pojar


Description: Over 1300 species of trees, shrubs, wildflowers, grasses, ferns, mosses and lichens are described and illustrated. Notes on origin of name, ecology, native uses, edibility and similar species are included, as are color-coded sections to allow for quick identification. 900 color photographs, 700+ line drawings.



The Grizzly Bear


Author: Thomas McNamee


Description: A natural history of “Ursus arctos horribilis” – lyrical, well written and provocative. An appropriate introduction to the beast for anyone traveling to grizzly country. McNamee also wrote “The Return of the Wolf to Yellowstone.”



Scats and Tracks of the Rocky Mountains


Author: James Halfpenny


Description: Wonder no more about those tracks in the mud or that poop on the path. With this packable guide, identification in the field is easy. Featured are the tracks, scats, and signs of 70 different species including wolf, ferret, grizzly bear, as well as birds, frogs and salamanders. Scales for scat diameter and footprint size are included along the edge of each descriptive page. Plus, for accurate measurements, there's a ruler on the back cover.





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