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Exploring Coastal Habitats on Chincoteague, Assateague and Wallops Islands by Land and by Sea

Program Number: 14761RJ
Start and End Dates:
6/15/2014 - 6/20/2014; 9/21/2014 - 9/26/2014; 8/30/2015 - 9/4/2015;
Duration: 5 nights
Location: Wallops Island, Virginia
Price starting at: $589.00 - Price may vary based on date, departure city
Program Type: Science & Nature
Meals: 15; 5 Breakfasts, 5 Lunches, 5 Dinners    
Meal Options: Vegetarian    

The barrier islands off Virginia’s Eastern Shore are protected from the effects of human habitation, their abundant ecosystems left to develop naturally amid the whims of tide and tempest. Through special access to three of these shifting masses of sand, swampland and coves — Chincoteague, Assateague and Wallops islands — join biologists and naturalists on a quest for understanding these dynamic environments that are designated a World Biosphere Reserve. Collect specimens on research cruises and kayak for a day to study the islands’ complex ecology firsthand. Search for dolphins, identify shells, and scour the dunes and marshlands for birdlife along this remarkable stretch of the Atlantic Flyway.




Highlights

• Cruise through one of the most productive ecosystems on earth as you trawl for samples of the organisms found in the estuary.
• Catch glimpses of egrets and herons on a peaceful kayak paddle through Jane’s Island State Park.
• Explore Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge — more than 14,000 acres of beach, dunes, marsh and forest.



Activity Particulars

Walking up to two miles on uneven, soft, sandy surfaces.



Coordinated by the Chincoteague Bay Field Station.




Wallops Island

Virginia’s Eastern Shore offers a historic and scenic combination of maritime heritage, wave-swept beaches, and both fresh and saltwater wetlands, as well as Wallops Island, a barrier island just off the coast in Chesapeake Bay.



Accommodations
Brand new, state-of-the-art residential hall in an environmental learning center. University-style suites have two bedrooms, one bath, large lounge area with television and internet access.
Meals and Lodgings
   Chincoteague Bay Field Station
  Wallops Island 6 nights
 Chincoteague Bay Field Station
Type: Field Station
  Description: The Chincoteague Bay Field Station (CBFS) of the Marine Science Consortium is a residential environmental learning center and field station which provides hands-on educational programs on coastal and marine environments. Road Scholar participants will be housed in one of the CBFS' residence halls. The residence hall is two stories tall and has no elevator. This facility is set up like a college-style dorm or camp retreat center where bedrooms are grouped into sets of four bedrooms, accessed through one exterior locking door. Inside participants will find four comfortable bedrooms and two bathrooms. Bedrooms have single twin beds, no bunk beds. There are two bathrooms per set of four rooms. Each bathroom has two sinks, two showers with changing areas, and two toilets. Bathrooms are not connected to bedrooms but are shared by only two rooms. (There will never be more than 4 people sharing one bathroom. Usually there are only two). All rooms are comfortable with central heat, and air conditioning. Each room has 2-4 beds, one night stand, a lamp and clothing storage. These accommodations give participants the private space they need, in private single bedrooms or shared with desired roommate, as well as great opportunities for socializing with others. Meals are served in a common dining room shared by all CBFS guests. A hot meal option is provided along with cereal, fruit, and yogurt available at breakfast and a salad bar available at lunch and dinner. Some meals are also taken at area restaurants that feature a variety of local seafood specialties. While our address says that CBFS is located on Wallops Island, participants will find that our campus is not actually on an island. We share a historic postal code with the nearby NASA Wallops Flight Facility and Navy base because of our common history and partnership. We are just a 5-minute drive away from three of Virginia's beautiful barrier islands- Wallops, Chincoteague, and Assateague.
  Contact info: 34001 Mill Dam Rd
Wallops Island, VA 23337 USA
phone: 757-824-5636
web: www.cbfieldstation.org
  Room amenities: A/C and Heat, Nightstand, Clothing Storage
  Facility amenities: The residence hall is located across campus from meeting spaces and cafeteria, with parking available nearby. A coin-operated laundry room is available. The campus has a large lounge for participants with comfortable chairs and sofas, tables to play games, and television. Wireless Internet access is available in the main Education Center.
  Smoking allowed: No
  Bathroom: There are two bathrooms per set of four rooms. Each bathroom has two sinks, two showers, and two toilets. Bathrooms are not connected to bedrooms. (There will never be more than 4 people sharing one bathroom. Usually there are only two).
  Additional nights prior: $35 Availability for additional nights of lodging is based on field station capacity and other scheduled programs. Please call the CBFS at least 3 weeks in advance to make a reservation.
  Check in time: 3:00 PM
  Additional nights after: $35 Availability for additional nights of lodging is based on field station capacity and other scheduled programs. Please call the CBFS at least 3 weeks in advance to make a reservation.
  Check out time: 9:00 AM


Travel Details
  Start of Program:
Registration and Check-In is from at 3:00-5:00 PM at the Chincoteague Bay Field Station Education Center You will be staying at Chincoteague Bay Field Station that night.
  End of Program:
Check out after lunch on the last day of the program. You will be staying at Chincoteague Bay Field Station the night before.
  Required documents:
The Road Scholar Health & Safety Form is required. Health form & liability release form are to be completed and returned to the program coordinator prior to the start of the program. They are mailed in advance to participants. You may want to bring your Golden Age Pass/Golden Eagle Pass/Duck Stamp if you plan on visiting the National Wildlife Refuge on your own, although it is not necessary for participation in our programs.
  Parking availability:
Parking is available.
Transportation
To Start of Program
  Location:  Wallops Island
  Nearest city or town:  Chincoteague, VA
  Nearest highway: VA Rt 13
  Nearest airport:  Salisbury Airport (SBY)
  From End of Program
  Location: Wallops Island
    (Additional transportation information same as above)
Travel Details
 

Oak Hall / T's Corner

 

From Bus Terminal

 
 

Service:

 

Hotel Shuttle
Chincoteague Bay Field Station
phone: 757-824-5636
Advanced Reservations Required

 

Per Person/One Way:

 

0
Prices are subject to change.

 

Travel Time:

 

.25 

   

Please call the Chincoteague Bay Field Station and let us know in advance if you are arriving by bus to Oak Hall, Virginia. We will arrange a ride for you.

 

Salisbury-Ocean City Wicomico Regional Airport

 

From Airport

 
 

Service:

 

None - Car Required
Advanced Reservations Required

 

Travel Time:

 

1.25 

   

We recommend renting a car ahead of time for the week. As there is no public transportation at all in Chincoteague, participants would otherwise be confined to the downtown shopping area during downtime. Avis, Enterprise and Hertz rentals have desks and cars at the airport. Avis: (410) 742-8566 Enterprise: (410) 677-3810 Hertz: (410) 749-2235

 

Salisbury-Ocean City Wicomico Regional Airport

 

From Airport

 
 

Service:

 

Taxi
Advanced Reservations Required

 

Travel Time:

 

1.25 

   

Costs include both the arrival and return trips. Gene's Taxi: (410) 749-8888 Cost: $206 Bailey's Taxi: (410) 546-4025 Cost: $199 cash $239 credit

 

Norfolk International Airport

 

From Airport

 
 

Service:

 

None - Car Required
Advanced Reservations Required

 

Per Person/One Way:

 

Price of rental + $12.00 toll for Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel
Prices are subject to change.

 

Travel Time:

 

2.3 

   

We recommend renting a car ahead of time for the week. As there is no public transportation at all in Chincoteague, participants would otherwise be confined to the downtown shopping area during downtime. The following companies have cars and desks at the airport: Alamo (800) 462-5266 Avis (800) 831-2847 Budget (800) 527-0700 Dollar (800) 800-3665 Enterprise (800) 736-8222 Hertz (800) 654-3131 National (800) 227-7368 Thrifty (800) 367-2277

 

Salisbury, MD

 

From Airport

 
 

Service:

 

Commercial Van/Shuttle
Greyhound
phone: 180-023-1222
Advanced Reservations Required

 

Per Person/One Way:

 

$33.00 (not including taxi from airport)
Prices are subject to change.

 

Travel Time:

 

1.3 

   

Bust station is a 5.2 mile ride from the airport by taxi. Gene's Taxi: (410) 749-8888 Bailey's Taxi: (410) 546-4025 International Taxi: (410) 548-1008 You will be traveling to the bus stop in Oak Hall, Va. Information is provided above about how to get from there to your final destination.

 
Driving Directions
  VA Rt 13 Follow Route 13 (Lankford Highway) to the traffic light at VA 175 (T’s Corner and Chincoteague Road). This is about 4 miles south of the MD-VA border on the Delmarva Peninsula. Take VA 175 E for approximately 3 miles. At the traffic light take a left onto Atlantic Road. At the end of Atlantic Road (approx. 0.5 miles) bear left onto Mill Dam Road. The Chincoteague Bay Field Station is located on your right. Turn right onto Enterprise Street (the right after the Chincoteague Bay Field Station sign), then make an immediate left. Check in will be at the Education Center.
Elevation Note: Sea level

Equipment Requirements: Closed toe shoes with good traction for work aboard the research vessel, shoes able to get wet, layered clothing for changeable weather, quick dry clothing for kayaking, rain gear, bug spray, & sunscreen.
The prices listed for commercial services and facilities that are not included in the program cost, such as airport shuttles or extra nights lodging, are subject to change without notice. Since Road Scholar cannot guarantee the accuracy of these prices, we strongly suggest contacting the companies directly for the most up-to-date information.


Daily Schedule

Day 1: Arrival and Welcome/Orientation
(Sunday, June 15)
   
 Arrive To: Please check into the Chincoteague Bay Field Station between 3:00 pm and 5:00 pm. Check in will be held in the Education Center. There will be signs to direct you. Program information, a current schedule, and your name tag will be given out at registration.
 Dinner: Get ready for a seafood feast! Sample local crabs and shrimp or if you choose, grilled chicken, or portabello mushrooms
 Evening: The first evening will entail introductions, a schedule overview, and social time.
   
Accommodations: Chincoteague Bay Field Station
Meals Included: Dinner

Day 2: Introduction to Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge /Inshore Research Cruise/Barrier Island Lecture
(Monday, June 16)
   
 Breakfast: Breakfast will be in the Chincoteague Bay Field Station cafeteria. Each day our cafeteria staff will present an array of fruits, hot and cold cereals, meats, breads/biscuits, pancakes and eggs for your choosing.
 Morning: Visit the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge.We will take a tour of one of the little seen, restricted access areas of the Refuge. Here we will see Wild Ponies, Birds and Amazing Wildlife!
 Lunch: Lunch will be on the Island at a local restaurant.
 Afternoon: Travel to the Chincoteague Bay Field Station boat basin. The boats are monitor boats, which are flat-bottomed stable vessels. On our research cruise you will use oceanographic equipment and chemical tests to explore the surrounding water. An otter trawl will then be used to collect organisms for future identification.
 Dinner: Dinner will be served in the Chincoteague Bay Field Station cafeteria. Our dining staff will prepare and serve your meal cafeteria style, with options ranging from a hot meal to a diverse salad bar.
 Evening: Barrier islands: the natural history, importance and future of these unique ecosystems. Learn about how one of the world's most biologically productive areas constantly changes as a result of a multitude of collaborative environmental factors.
   
Accommodations: Chincoteague Bay Field Station
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Day 3: Janes Island State Park/Salt Marsh Ecology Guest Speaker on the life of a waterman
(Tuesday, June 17)
   
 Breakfast: Breakfast will be in the Chincoteague Bay Field Station cafeteria.
 Morning: Today's adventure will lead us through Jane’s Island State Park in the Chesapeake Bay. Winding through the small tidal inlets of the salt marsh in our quiet kayaks will provide intimate encounters with egrets, herons and other animals. Learn about the different microhabitats within a marsh, the organisms that spend their lives there, and the reasons we should protect this increasingly endangered environment.
 Lunch: Box lunches will be eaten on along the shore of the Chesapeake Bay. Participants will prepare their lunches in the cafeteria before leaving in the morning.
 Afternoon: During lunch, your instructors will lead a group discussion about wetlands. The afternoon will be a continuation of the paddle through the winding creeks and guts of the salt marsh.
 Dinner: Dinner will be served in the Chincoteague Bay Field Station cafeteria. Our dining staff will prepare and serve your meal cafeteria style, with options ranging from a hot meal to a diverse salad bar.
 Evening: Discuss the local fisheries and life on the water with a local waterman!
   
Accommodations: Chincoteague Bay Field Station
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Day 4: Organism Laboratory/Salt Marsh Ecology/ Horseshoe Crab Lecture
(Wednesday, June 18)
   
 Breakfast: Breakfast will be in the Chincoteague Bay Field Station cafeteria.
 Morning: This morning will be a lecture on the different organisms in the area! In one of the laboratories identify all the species caught on the boat trips and have a fun and interactive talk about these local animals. Visit the aqua lab to observe the feeding behavior of different marine organisms and learn about the other year round creatures in the tanks. Also view plankton under the lens of a microscope.
 Lunch: Lunch will be in the Chincoteague Bay Field Station cafeteria.
 Afternoon: Spend the afternoon at a salt marsh on Wallops Island, learning about the ecology of wetlands. The island is a Navy/NASA facility and closed to the public, therefore the environments have maintained their pristine quality.
 Dinner: Dinner will be in the Chincoteague Bay Field Station cafeteria.
 Evening: Horseshoe crabs have been around since the time of the dinosaurs! Their blood is becoming increasingly important in medical research. Learn about how horseshoe crab blood is being collected and studied.
   
Accommodations: Chincoteague Bay Field Station
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Day 5: Maritime Forest Hike, Free Afternoon, Music Performance
(Thursday, June 19)
   
 Breakfast: Breakfast will be in the Chincoteague Bay Field Station cafeteria.
 Morning: Take a walk through the unique habitat of a maritime forest. Learn about flora and fauna of the coastal forest and how it formed.
 Lunch: Lunch will be in the Chincoteague Bay Field Station cafeteria.
 Afternoon: This is a free afternoon to visit some of the local sites, explore the town of Chincoteague, walk the trails of the Wildlife Refuge, fish, shop, or just relax on our pristine beach.
 Dinner: Sample some of our local fare, clams, crab or maybe a juicy steak!
 Evening: Enjoy evening entertainment by very talented local musicians and storytellers
   
Accommodations: Chincoteague Bay Field Station
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Day 6: Wallops Island Dune Trip
(Friday, June 20)
   
 Breakfast: Breakfast will be in the Chincoteague Bay Field Station cafeteria.
 Morning: Venture back out to Wallops Island for a trip to the beach to learn about dune succession. Time on the beach will be spent looking for dolphins, birding, and collecting/identifying shells.
 Lunch: Lunch will be in the Chincoteague Bay Field Station cafeteria.
 Afternoon: Check out with your leader and say goodbye!
   
Accommodations: Chincoteague Bay Field Station
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch
Important information about your itinerary: Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the information featured on this website. Itineraries are based on our best information at this time. Circumstances beyond our control may require us to adjust itineraries or other details. We regret any inconvenience this may cause and appreciate your understanding. Information will be sent to you from your Program Provider approximately three weeks prior to the program start date. The prices listed for commercial services and facilities that are not included in the program cost, such as airport shuttles or extra nights lodging, are subject to change without notice. Since Road Scholar cannot guarantee the accuracy of these prices, we strongly suggest contacting the companies directly for the most up-to-date information.

Suggested Reading List


A Field Guide to the Atlantic Seashore: From the Bay of Fundy to Cape Hatteras


Author: Kenneth L. Gosner


Description: More than 1,000 illustrations, arranged according to visual similarities, show plant and animal species of the Atlantic Coast from the Bay of Fundy to Cape Hatteras. This guide includes information on how to locate each species by geographic range, tidal range, tidal level, season, topography, and climate.



Atlantic Shorelines: Natural History and Ecology


Author: Mark D. Bertness


Description: Atlantic Shorelines is an introduction to the natural history and ecology of shoreline communities on the East Coast of North America. Writing for a broad audience, Mark Bertness examines how distinctive communities of plants and animals are generated on rocky shores and in salt marshes, mangroves, and soft sediment beaches on Atlantic shorelines. The book provides a comprehensive background for understanding the basic principles of intertidal ecology and the unique conditions faced by intertidal organisms. It describes the history of the Atlantic Coast, tides, and near-shore oceanographic processes that influence shoreline organisms; explains primary production in shoreline systems, intertidal food webs, and the way intertidal organisms survive; sets out the unusual reproductive challenges of living in an intertidal habitat, and the role of recruitment in shaping intertidal communities; and outlines how biological processes like competition, predation, facilitation, and ecosystem engineering generate the spatial structure of intertidal communities. The last part of the book focuses on the ecology of the three main shoreline habitats--rocky shores, soft sediment beaches, and shorelines vegetated with salt marsh plants and mangroves--and discusses in detail conservation issues associated with each of them.



Beautiful Swimmers: Watermen, Crabs and the Chesapeake Bay


Author: William W. Warner


Description: William Warner exhibits his skill as a naturalist and as a writer in this Pulitzer Prize-winning study of the pugnacious Atlantic blue crab and of its Chesapeake Bay territory. This wonderful work contains all you ever wanted to know about the life cycle of one particular kind of crab that lives in Chesapeake Bay (the kind you probably smashed with mallets if you ever went to that area). Surprisingly, for most of its life, the Atlantic blue crab has nothing to do with beer. Taking it for a focus, Warner draws connections with the sea, the rivers, the crab-friendly environment that produced such a wealth of the creatures, and then the people who live from that wealth, the islanders who lived isolated for centuries, but are now firmly within the web of modern life. Warner tells of the marketing of crabs, the catching of other Chesapeake products like oysters, and even of festivals like a Miss Crustacean contest ! You can learn about esoterica like crab pots, the Waterman's Union, the religious heritage of crabbers, and lots more.



Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge: An Ecological Treasure


Author: Irene Hinke-Sacilotto


Description: Beautiful photos of Chincoteague National Wildlife: birds, ponies, sunsets. Not a lot of detailed information but it is a photography book primarily and nice to look at and dream of being there.



Common Plants of the Mid-Atlantic Coast: A Field Guide


Author: Gene M. Silberhorn


Description: From eelgrass rooted in wrack lines on windswept back shores to hardy maritime forests sculpted by strong winds and salt spray, the Mid-Atlantic coast is rich with a variety of habitats and an abundance of common, if not always familiar, plants. In Common Plants of the Mid-Atlantic Coast, Gene M. Silberhorn provides a field guide to the plants found along the coast from Long Island Sound to North Carolina's barrier islands. This introduction to the fragile ecology and remarkable beauty of the flora of the coastal region was highly praised by reviewers when it was first published in 1982. This revised edition retains the features that earned it acclaim and provides a wealth of new information. The three sections of the book correspond to the natural divisions of the landscape: Section One covers beaches, dunes, and marine forests; Section Two includes salt and brackish marshes; and Section Three reviews plants found in tidal and nontidal freshwater wetlands. Each section of Common Plants begins with an introduction that describes the characteristics of the area and the flora to be found there. Individual plant entries follow. Delicate illustrations accompany facing page descriptions that aid in identification and provide concise background information, as well as delightful anecdotes. Plant entries now includes the subheadings: "Growth Habit and Diagnostic Characteristics," where the reader will find descriptions of general appearance, "Distribution," which tells where along the coast the plant is found, "Habitat," and, particularly important in this age of heightened environmental awareness, "Ecological Value/Benefits." The author has also added each plant's "Wetland Indicator Status," which estimates a species' frequency of occurrence in wetland habitats. Seventeen species have been added to this fully updated second edition. The appendices now include websites for various federal and state, coastal parks, refuges, and natural areas.



Kayaking Made Easy, 3rd: A Manual for Beginners with Tips for the Experienced (Made Easy Series)


Author: Dennis Stuhaug


Description: This newly expanded and revised third edition of Kayaking Made Easy: A Manual For Beginners With Tips For The Experienced by Dennis Stuhaug is a complete and thorough "how to" guide to the sport and recreation of kayaking. Providing readers with a concisely presenting approach to preparing for and engaging in kayaking, Kayaking Made Easy offers a truly "user friendly" guide to everything from choosing the right hull for individual needs, outfitting the kayak with seat, flotation, spray deck and other fittings, mastering basic maneuvers from the sweep stroke to the sculling brace, and assembling a kayaking wardrobe that is both comfortable and affordable, to safe navigation through the hazards of wind, fog, eddies and rip currents, and ensuring that all companions, including kids, enjoy the active and fun ride. A welcome addition to personal and community library reference collections, Kayaking Made Easy is very strongly recommended reading for novice kayakers, and has much of value to offer even seasoned kayakers. Warning: This instruction guide relies heavily on written descriptions rather than pictures.



Life and Death of the Salt Marsh


Author: Mildred and John Teal


Description: Life and Death of the Salt Marsh is a book that focuses on many aspects of the ecology of the salt marsh. To quote the authors, it is "about the marshes of the East Coast of North America: how they were formed; why they continue to exist; the interplay of plants and animals; and the effect of that influential animal, man." This book does a very thorough job of covering all these topics. It begins with the story of one particular salt marsh, how it formed, what happened to it when colonists first arrived and used it for hay production, and its eventual death after human impact became so great as to prevent marsh recovery. The remainder of the book gives detailed descriptions of the processes and organisms that affect the salt marsh. These include the geology, history of glaciation, plant and animal species, seasons, and topics relating to marsh pollution and conservation. Considering that this book was written in 1969, thirty years ago, it still seems to have good scientific accuracy. It is interesting to look at this book from a historical perspective, especially the sections on conservation. Preservation of marshes is important for many reasons. The main reason for preservation being that a large variety of species rely on salt marshes during part or all of their life cycle. Many of these species are commercially viable and are (or were when the book was written) important to the East Coast economy. The chapter on pollution control was very interesting. It includes discussion of the use of DDT. Most ecologist today have heard of or read Silent Spring and know about the dangers of DDT. Life and Death of the Salt Marsh was written just before Silent Spring, by Janet Carson, and brings up the many dangers and harmful side effects of DDT. Obvious DDT was an area of concern for many people in fields related to ecology in the late 60's. The entire book could be related to many aspects of ecology and is thus relevant to anyone interested in the ecology of salt marshes.



Misty of Chincoteague


Author: Marguerite Henry


Description: On an island off the coasts of Virginia and Maryland lives a centuries-old band of wild ponies. Among them is the most mysterious of all, Phantom, a rarely seen mare that eludes all efforts to capture her--that is, until a young boy and girl lay eyes on her and determine that they can't live without her. The frenzied roundup that follows on the next "Pony Penning Day" does indeed bring Phantom into their lives, in a way they never would have suspected. Phantom would forever be a creature of the wild. But her gentle, loyal colt Misty is another story altogether. Marguerite Henry's Newbery Honor Book has captivated generations of boys and girls both with its thrilling descriptions of true incidents from the tiny island of Chincoteague, and its realistic yet wonderfully magical atmosphere. This story of an animal brought into captivity poignantly reveals the powerful opposing forces of humans and nature. Wesley Dennis's pen-and-ink ponies are masterfully depicted with rippling muscles, shaggy coats, and free spirits.



Off 13: The Eastern Shore of Virginia Guidebook


Author: Kirk Mariner


Description: Kirk Mariner's book "Off 13 - The Eastern Shore of Virginia Guidebook" offers a highly informative and entertaining guide to an overlooked but tranquil peninsula bounded by the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean, not far from the Nation's Capital. Many people know of Chincoteague but may not be aware that the rest of the Virginia eastern shore is well worth exploring. "Off 13" is full of interesting anecdotes and historical information about the area and its many little towns as well as useful and practical information for travellers.



Once upon an island: The history of Chincoteague


Author: Kirk Mariner


Description: This book is not just another collection of essays and sepia pictures about a local landmark or town. Kirk Mariner's review is a thoughtful and thorough history of a small island community - as thorough as one can be when natural history and the lack of written records affect the narrative as often as it does Chincoteague.



The Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Eastern North America


Author: David Allen Sibley and Rick Cech


Description: Providing birders the convenience of portability, Sibley's newest volume breaks down the information in The Sibley Guide to Birds into specific regions (The Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Western North America will be published the same month). The guide includes much of the basic information in the Guide to Birds, such as the parts of a bird and general color-coded maps, but focuses most of its attention on birds who make their home east of the Rocky Mountains, such as the Double-crested Cormorant and the Eastern Screech-Owl. The color-coded maps that accompany each bird show where the birds live throughout North America, so that birders in, say, Pennsylvania, will know to look for the Northern Mockingbird in California as well. And, of course, Sibley's beautiful full-colored paintings of birds jump out at every page-even in small format.



True Tales of the Eastern Shore


Author: Kirk Mariner


Wallops Island (Images of America: Virginia) (Paperback)


Author: Nan Devincent Hayes and Bowen Bennett


Description: Located in Accomack County on Virginiaís Eastern Shore, Wallops Island was once a primitive swath of land, uncivilized but by the wild ponies and mosquitoes that made its scrub-covered shores their home. But as the centuries passed, the wildness of the island was radically altered by the influx of colonists, then vacationers, and, eventually, some of the brightest scientific minds in the country. ÝÝThe history of Wallops Island has been one of transition. In the colonial period, John Wallop, an industrious man and self-made millionaire, was granted much of the islandís acreage by the English Crown for providing assistance to new colonists trying to reach Virginia. In 1889, Wallops Island was bought and converted into a vacation destination for a handful of wealthy families from Pennsylvania, who, in turn, sold the island to the federal government in the 1940s. Once in the hands of NASA the island was transformed into a center for the high-tech development of rockets, missiles, and the means for space travel. From weather balloons and Tiamat missiles to aerodynamics and hurricane research, the Wallops Island Flight Facility and its predecessors have been instrumental in the evolution and success of the American space program.





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