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Exploring Salem: A Literary Trail, Witches on Trial, the Peabody Essex Museum

Program Number: 1571RJ
Start and End Dates:
4/15/2013 - 4/19/2013; 5/18/2015 - 5/22/2015; 7/20/2015 - 7/24/2015; 9/14/2015 - 9/18/2015;
Duration: 4 nights
Location: Salem, Massachusetts
Price starting at: $861.00 - Price may vary based on date, departure city
Program Type: Literature; History & Culture Activity Level: t (see description)
Meals: 11; 4 Breakfasts, 3 Lunches, 4 Dinners    
Meal Options: Vegetarian; Kosher; Low Fat; Low Salt    

In 1692, controversial witch trials made the city of Salem, Massachusetts famous — but there is so much more to this dynamic city! Discover the remarkable historical, architectural, and cultural heritage of one of America's oldest communities. Through lively illustrated lectures, walking excursions and visits to historic sites, relive the excitement of Salem's lucrative maritime trade and enjoy the grace and beauty of its magnificent mansions. Visit the world-renowned Peabody Essex Museum to see Yin Yu Tang, an authentic 17th-century Chinese house, and enjoy the museum's outstanding collection of art and antiques.




Highlights

• Learn about the 1692 Witch Trials and today's theories of how this blight on American history was allowed to occur.
• Follow the footsteps of Nathaniel Hawthorne on a Salem Literary Trail ending at the House of Seven Gables.
• Join historian Jim McAllister for a look at American Impressionism, and learn why many artists came to the region.



Activity Particulars

Light walking over uneven ground.



Coordinated by Road Scholar.




Salem (Massachusetts)

Settled in 1626, Salem is one of America’s oldest seaport communities. The Peabody Essex Museum, one of the largest on the East Coast, houses a diverse collection of art and tells the story of New England art and architecture.



Accommodations
Beautifully restored National Trust Historic Hotel, located on Salem Common.

Road Scholar Instructors
These instructors are participating on at least one date of this program. Please note that changes may occur.
Jim McAllister

Jim McAllister is a Salem historian, photographer, author, and teacher and serves as a historic consultant to the City of Salem and The Hawthorne Hotel. A graduate of Stonehill College, his photographs of Salem have appeared in publications including The New York Times and The Boston Globe. He is the author of “Salem: From Naumkeag to Witch City,” and co-author of “Salem: Cornerstones of a Historic City.” Jim has appeared on both the History Channel and Home and Garden TV.
 
Meals and Lodgings
   Hawthorne Hotel
  Salem, Massachusetts 4 nights
 Hawthorne Hotel
Type: Hotel
  Description: Each of the 89 rooms are individually furnished and tastefully appointed with 18th century style reproduction furnishings to reflect their own New England charm and character. There is a lovely fireplace in the lobby. A National Trust Historic Hotel. www.hawthornehotel.com
  Contact info: On the Common
Salem, MA 01970 USA
phone: 800-729-7829
web: www.hawthornehotel.com
  Room amenities: Cable TV, private baths.
  Facility amenities: Nathaniel's Restaurant, Tavern on the Green, valet and laundry service, seven meeting & function rooms, full formal ballroom, exercise facility, gift shop, parking available, complimentary morning coffee service, complimentary local phone calls
  Smoking allowed: No
  Elevators available: Yes
  Additional nights prior: Contact Hotel Please consult Hotel for rates.
  Check in time: 3:00 PM
  Additional nights after: Contact Hotel Please consult Hotel for rates.
  Check out time: 11:00 AM


Travel Details
  Start of Program:
4-5 pm check in and registration You will be staying at Hawthorne Hotel that night.
  End of Program:
Program ends after morning lecture. You will be staying at Hawthorne Hotel the night before.
  Required documents:
The Road Scholar Health & Safety Form is required.
  Parking availability:
Parking is free for the entire program
Transportation
To Start of Program
  Location:  Salem, Massachusetts
  Nearest highway: Rte. 114
  Nearest airport:  Logan Airport, Boston, MA
  From End of Program
  Location: Salem, Massachusetts
    (Additional transportation information same as above)
Travel Details
 

Boston's North Station to Salem

 

To Train Station

 
 

Service:

 

Public Transportation
MBTA Commuter Rail
phone: 617-222-3200

 

Per Person/One Way:

 

$6.75
Prices are subject to change.

 

Travel Time:

 

30 minutes 

   

Board any Newburyport, Rockport, or Beverly bound train. After departing the train at Salem station, walk to the other end of the platform and up the staircase that leads toward the street. Walk straight across the cross-walk and down Washington Street. You'll walk three blocks down Washington, passing several shops and restaurants before you get to Essex Street. Hang a left on Essex and walk the historic 1/4 mile until you come out on Hawthorne Blvd. The Hawthorne Hotel is across the street.

 
Driving Directions
  From Boston's Logan Airport As you are exiting the airport, you want to follow the signs for Route 1A North (Revere/Lynn) You will follow Route 1A for 16 miles - watch carefully for the signs. You will go through several small towns, as Route 1A is the coastal road out of Boston. Within a few miles of the airport, you will come to two small rotaries - whenever you hit these - stay in the right lane for Route 1A North. Once you enter Lynn, you will pass several car dealerships, Walmart, Building 19, Ferguson Enterprises. Route 1A takes a left turn; North Shore Community College is on your right. Again, you are going through small towns; watch for 1A North signs at intersections. Once you pass the "Entering Salem" sign, you will quickly come upon Salem State College South Campus on your left. At Lena's Sub Shop, bear right - staying on Route 1A. You will then pass the Central Campus Parking on the right. You then see Salem State's main campus on your right - this is identified by the light brick buildings. At the light in front of the college, you will turn left (still Route 1A). This is Lafayette Street - also Route 114 West. Pass Christina's Pizza. Pass St. Joseph's Church on your right - stay straight. At the next light, Fire Station will be across the street; turn right - still Route 1A North. At the next four-way intersection, turn left. Still Route 1A North (Hawthorne Blvd.). The hotel is one block up on the right. Parking lot is the right turn at the light before the hotel.
  From North (Maine and Eastern NH) You want to get to I-95 heading south into Massachusetts. Maine Turnpike is I-95.Take Exit 45 - Route 128 North, Gloucester Take 1-95 to exit 45 (Route 128 North - Gloucester). Take Exit 26, Lowell Street East to Peabody & Salem. Follow Lowell Street 1 mile to the center of Peabody. You will pass the Fire Department on your left and then Town Hall on your right. At the next set of lights, stay straight on Lowell Street. Go through two more sets of lights and you will pass the "Entering Salem" sign on the right. When you enter Salem, the street name changes to Boston Street. As you approach the second set of lights, Dunkin Donuts is on your left and Walgreen's is on your right. You need to be in the left lane. At the lights, make a left on to Route 107 North, also called Bridge Street. Follow Bridge Street 3/4 of a mile to the traffic lights on the overpass and stay in the right lane. Stay straight through the lights, staying on Bridge Street and take the right onto St. Peter Street. At the end of St. Peter Street, take a left on Brown Street. At the end of Brown Street, you will be facing the Salem common. Take a right and the Hawthorne Hotel will be on your left. Parking lot is directly behind the hotel.
  From South and West of Salem (I-93, 1-84, I-95(RI), I-90): You want to get to Interstate 95 North in Massachusetts. (This is Exit 14 off I-90) Take Exit 45 - Route 128 North, Gloucester Take 1-95 to exit 45 (Route 128 North - Gloucester). Take Exit 26, Lowell Street East to Peabody & Salem. Follow Lowell Street 1 mile to the center of Peabody. You will pass the Fire Department on your left and then Town Hall on your right. At the next set of lights, stay straight on Lowell Street. Go through two more sets of lights and you will pass the "Entering Salem" sign on the right. When you enter Salem, the street name changes to Boston Street. As you approach the second set of lights Dunkin Donuts is on your left and Walgreen's is on your right. You need to be in the left lane. At the lights, make a left on to Route 107 North, also called Bridge Street. Follow Bridge Street 3/4 of a mile to the traffic light on the overpass and stay in the right lane. Stay straight through the lights, staying on Bridge Street and take the first right onto St. Peter Street. At the end of St. Peter Street, take a left on Brown Street. At the end of Brown Street, you will be facing the Salem Common. Take a right and the Hawthorne Hotel will be on your left. Parking lot is directly behind the hotel.
The prices listed for commercial services and facilities that are not included in the program cost, such as airport shuttles or extra nights lodging, are subject to change without notice. Since Road Scholar cannot guarantee the accuracy of these prices, we strongly suggest contacting the companies directly for the most up-to-date information.


Daily Schedule

Day 1: Registration and Welcome Dinner/Orientation
(Monday, April 15)
   
 Afternoon: 4-5PM arrival to hotel for registration.
 Dinner: Dinner will be served at the hotel. All dinners are served at the hotel's restaurant, Nathaniels which has an excellent reputation for fine continental cuisine.
 Evening: Following dinner, there will be an orientation and introductions.
   
Accommodations: Hawthorne Hotel
Meals Included: Dinner

Day 2: Introduction to Salem/ Lecture and guided walk on the history of witch trials/ Salem witch museum
(Tuesday, April 16)
   
 Breakfast: Breakfast is served at the Hawthorne from 7:30-8:30AM.
 Morning: Introduction lecture to Salem followed by a visit to the Salem Witch Museum for a very different and entertaining view of the Witch Trials. This program is a sound and light interactive show and is surprisingly authentic. Museum consultants give their view of some current theories on the origins of the superstitions about witches and why the early Christian religious leaders came to persecute many innocent victims.
 Lunch: Lunch at local restaurant
 Afternoon: Discover what you didn't know about the history of the 1692 Witch Trials, with a local Salem historian who is an expert on the Witch Trials. Following the lecture, our guide will treat us to a leisurely walking tour of historic sites central to the witch trials. We'll see the Salem's Witch Memorial and a 17th century burial ground that guarantees goosebumps.
 Dinner: Dinner is served at the hotel.
 Evening: Lecture on beliefs of the Puritans in 17th century New England.
   
Accommodations: Hawthorne Hotel
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Day 3: Private docent led visit to the Peabody Essex Museum / Learn about the First American Impressionists and their connection to the North Shore and Cape Ann through a lecture and guided walk
(Wednesday, April 17)
   
 Breakfast: Breakfast is served at the Hawthorne from 7:30-8:30AM.
 Morning: We start at the Peabody Essex Museum for an exclusive private docent led visit before the museum opens to the public. Explore the Yin Yu Tang, the only complete Qing Dynasty house outside of China. Learn about the beginnings of this museum dating to the 1799 founding of the East India Marine Society, an organization of Salem ship captains who had sailed beyond either the Cape of Good Hope or Cape Horn. The society’s charter mandated the establishment of what we today would call a museum. With this in mind, society members brought home to Salem a wide-ranging collection of objects from the northwest coast of America, Asia, Africa, Oceania, and India. By 1825, the society moved into its own building, East India Marine Hall, which today contains the original display cases and some of the very first objects collected. The museum today contains objects merged from different organizations over the past 200 years, including the Essex Historical Society, the Essex County Natural History Society, and the Peabody Academy of Science. Each of these groups contributed artwork and artifacts from its collections: natural specimens, ethnological objects, books and historical memorabilia. Today the Peabody Essex Museum houses more than 840,000 works of art and culture featuring maritime art and history; American art; Asian, Oceanic, and African art; Asian export art; two large libraries with over 400,000 books, manuscripts, and documents; and 22 historic buildings. *Work has begun on the museum’s renovation and expansion project, part of a comprehensive $650 million Advancement Campaign to celebrate outstanding artistic and cultural creativity in ways that transform people’s lives. Upon completion of the building expansion in 2017, PEM will rank among the top 10 art museums in the nation in terms of gallery space and total endowment and in the top 15 in annual operating budget. Due to these renovations the libraries and some exhibits will be not available for viewing
 Lunch: Lunch at a local restaurant
 Afternoon: This afternoon, we have a fascinating slide show and lecture by Salem historian Jim McAllister on the first American Impressionists, who called Cape Ann/North Shore home. These artists were drawn to this area for its natural beauty, the clarity and distinctions of the seasons, and the quality of light in the landscapes. The works of Theodore Wendel, Winslow Homer, Arthur Wesley Dow (teacher of Georgia O'Keefe), Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper and many more will be discussed.
 Dinner: Dinner is served at the hotel.
 Evening: After another delicious Hawthorne dinner, we enjoy an entertaining lecture.
   
Accommodations: Hawthorne Hotel
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Day 4: Lecture on Nathaniel Hawthorne & "Hawthorne Trail" guided walk. Visit to the House of Seven Gables and then lunch followed by an exploration of Salem Maritime Historic Site.
(Thursday, April 18)
   
 Breakfast: Breakfast served at Hawthorne from 7:30-8:30AM.
 Morning: Today we travel back to the times of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Salem's most famous native son. In the morning we hear an entertaining lecture on Hawthorne's life, the times he lived in, his writings and his relationships to Transcendentalists Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Elizabeth Peabody and poet Jones Very. We go for a guided walking , tracing Hawthorne's footsteps on his first date with Sophia Peabody, following their courtship and marriage. We see the houses where Hawthorne lived and wrote, where he courted Sophia, and the cemetery where his ancestors are buried. We will also visit sites that appear in, or are otherwise related to, his writings, including the House of the Seven Gables. The house, also called the Turner-Ingersoll Mansion, was built in 1668 and was owned by Hawthorne’s cousin, whom he frequently visited. It was where our Nathaniel Hawthorne was inspired to write his famous novel. Our guide points out all the nooks and crannies that appear in Hawthorne’s best-selling mystery. If you haven’t read this novel recently, this tour will make you want to! Also on the property are lovely seaside gardens and the original house Hawthorne was born in, which was transported to this site. The House of the Seven Gables’ campus constitutes its own national historic district on The National Register of Historic Places. The museum houses more than 2,000 artifacts and objects, more than 40 framed works, 500 photographs and glass plate negatives, and more than 650 volumes in the research and rare-book library.
 Lunch: Lunch in downtown Salem.
 Afternoon: After lunch we take a guided tour of the stately Federal-style Custom House, a Salem Maritime National Historic Site, where Nathaniel Hawthorne worked for three years and whose employees he describes in unflattering terms in the opening chapter of “The Scarlet Letter” after his firing. Hawthorne's office in the Customs House is restored to look exactly as it did when he worked there as Surveyor of the Port of Salem. Walking down Derby street and along Derby Wharf, we picture ourselves in Hawthorne’s Salem and can climb aboard the magnificent tall ship Friendship of Salem, a recently launched replica of the ship that was built in Salem 200 years ago. We can also visit the elegant Georgian style Derby House, built in 1767 as a wedding present for Elias Haskett and Elizabeth Crowninshield Derby, who lived here for twenty years, raising their seven children here during the years leading up to and during the Revolutionary War.
 Dinner: Dinner served at The Hawthorne.
 Evening: Lecture: Local Color of Salem
   
Accommodations: Hawthorne Hotel
Meals Included: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Day 5: Farewell Breakfast, final discussion and check-out
(Friday, April 19)
   
 Breakfast: Breakfast is served at the Hawthorne Hotel from 7:30-8:30AM.
 Morning: After our farewell breakfast, we enjoy an entertaining lecture before departing for home.
   
Meals Included: Breakfast

Free Time Opportunities
 
  Salem, Massachusetts Marblehead
Known as the yachting capital of the world, Marblehead is a beautiful little town with shops, beaches, cafes and a lighthouse.
  Newburyport
A beautiful city on the ocean. Fun shops and good food. Historic 18th century buildings, movie theater, antique shops, Plum Island beach and the Parker River Wildlife Refuge For additional information, visit www.newburyportchamber.org/
  Rockport
A quaint fishing village with shops and cafes, art galleries and dramatic views of the rocky coastline. Visit a house made entirely of paper, Halibut Point State Park and Bearskin Neck.
  Visitor's Bureau
17 Peabody Square, Peabody, MA 01960 Tel: 978.977.7760 Fax: 978.977.7758
Important information about your itinerary: Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the information featured on this website. Itineraries are based on our best information at this time. Circumstances beyond our control may require us to adjust itineraries or other details. We regret any inconvenience this may cause and appreciate your understanding. Information will be sent to you from your Program Provider approximately three weeks prior to the program start date. The prices listed for commercial services and facilities that are not included in the program cost, such as airport shuttles or extra nights lodging, are subject to change without notice. Since Road Scholar cannot guarantee the accuracy of these prices, we strongly suggest contacting the companies directly for the most up-to-date information.

Suggested Reading List


The Scarlet Letter


Author: Nathaniel Hawthorne


Description: Published in 1850, it is considered a masterpiece of American literature and a classic moral study. The novel is set in a village in Puritan New England. The main character is Hester Prynne, a young woman who has borne an illegitimate child. Hester believes herself a widow, but her husband, Roger Chillingworth, returns to New England very much alive and conceals his identity. He finds his wife forced to wear the scarlet letter A on her dress as punishment for her adultery. Chillingworth becomes obsessed with finding the identity of his wife's former lover. When he learns that the father of Hester's child is Arthur Dimmesdale, a saintly young minister who is the leader of those exhorting her to name the child's father, Chillingworth proceeds to torment the guilt-stricken young man. In the end Chillingworth is morally degraded by his monomaniacal pursuit of revenge; Dimmesdale is broken by his own sense of guilt, and he publicly confesses his adultery before dying in Hester's arms. Only Hester can face the future bravely, as she plans to take her daughter Pearl to Europe to begin a new life.



Every Day Life in the Massachusetts Bay Colony


Author: George Francis Dow


Description: Product Description: Comprehensive, reliable account of 17th-century life in one of country’s earliest settlements. Contemporary records, over 100 historically valuable pictures vividly describe early dwellings, furnishings, medicinal aids, wardrobes, trade, crimes, punishment, much more. "...beautifully made, interestingly illustrated."—New York Times.



The Crucible


Author: Arthur Miller


Description: Product Description: Based on historical people and real events, Arthur Miller's play uses the destructive power of socially sanctioned violence unleashed by the rumors of witchcraft as a powerful parable about McCarthyism.





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