Road Scholar educational adventures are created by Elderhostel,
the not-for-profit world leader in lifelong learning since 1975.


Call (800) 454-5768

Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET


Create an account                             Forgot your password?

or Log In via Facebook

Log in to see all you can do with your online Road Scholar account.

PERU

Hiking the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu

Select a Date

 

SIGN UP

and receive your

FREE E-NEWSLETTER

&

E-Photo Book:



Top 10 Learning Experiences Around the World

Find A Program

Search By:

Location

Peru

Interest

Walking/Hiking

Price Range

$2000 - $3500

Start Date

End Date

More Options


AnyInternationalSt. BartsUnited StatesCanadaAfghanistanAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanAzoresBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaireBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBrazilBritish Virgin IslandsBruneiBulgariaBurmaBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanary IslandsCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChileChinaColombiaComorosCongoCook IslandsCosta RicaCroatiaCubaCuracaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEaster IslandEcuadorEgyptEnglandEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland IslandsFaroe IslandsFederated States of MicronesiaFijiFinlandFranceFrance Southern TerritoriesFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench West IndiesGabonGalapagos IslandsGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernsey IslandGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard and Mc Donald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIrelandIsles of ScillyIsraelItalyIvory CoastJamaicaJapanJersey IslandJordanKazakhstanKenyaKoreaKosovoKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacedoniaMadagascarMadeira IslandsMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMidway IslandMoldovaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueNamibiaNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorthern Mariana IslandsNorthwest TerritoriesNorwayOmanPacific IslandsPakistanPalauPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarReunionRomaniaRussia (Siberia)Russian FederationRwandaSaint HelenaSamoaSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaScotlandSenegalSerbiaSeychellesShetland IslandsSierra LeoneSingaporeSlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSpainSri LankaSt Kitts and NevisSt. Eustatius (Statia)St. LuciaSt. Pierre & MiquelonSt. Vincent and the GrenadinesSurinamSurinameSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaTasmaniaThailandTibetTogoTongaTrinidad and TobagoTristan da CunhaTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and CaicosUS Virgin IslandsUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamWalesWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe
Road Scholar
Program #19937RJ
12 Days | 11 Nights
ACTIVITY LEVEL: Challenging
While all of our learning adventures offer extraordinary value, our "Best Value" programs were rated by our participants themselves who thought their dollar went particularly far.
Love to learn in a small-group setting? This collection of programs has at most 10-24 participants.
See our Small Group programs.
EasyFor people looking to exercise their minds more than their bodies. There’s minimal walking and not too many stairs.
ModerateThese programs get you on your feet and include activities such as walking up to a mile in a day through a city and standing in a museum for a few hours.
ActiveFor people who enjoy walking as much as two miles a day, perhaps to explore historic neighborhoods or a nature trail.
Moderately ChallengingFor hardy explorers who enjoy a good physical challenge, spending most of their days on the go.
ChallengingGet ready to keep up with our highest-energy group. These demanding — and rewarding — programs are for seasoned outdoor enthusiasts.
Discussion Board

Before we can post your comment, you must be logged in to your Road Scholar Account
or


Log In via Facebook

Richard Smith Nov 17, 2014 at 07:38 PM

Although the RS materials didn't mention it, a good Thermorest pad and bag liner (sheet) were provided on the trail.
Laura Hare Nov 18, 2014 at 09:33 AM

Thank you, Richard for bringing this up! We have added these two items, the 1.75 mat and the sleeping bag liner, to our Final packing list.
Richard Smith Nov 18, 2014 at 11:25 AM

I may have misstated it, Road Scholar provided them, no need to bring the Thermorest or liner yourself
Laura Hare Nov 18, 2014 at 11:29 AM

My apologies, I work for the the provider, Holbrook Travel, and we create the packing list. We added these to our list of materials for the Preparatory Booklet since you mentioned it.
Laura Hare Nov 18, 2014 at 11:30 AM

we appreciate your comments and are always looking for ways to improve to keep participants more informed.
Laura Hare Nov 18, 2014 at 11:30 AM

we appreciate your comments and are always looking for ways to improve to keep participants more informed.


Sheri Ann Cate Nov 06, 2014 at 11:36 PM

One of the most helpful things you can do to prepare for this trip is to spend time at high altitude before you go. All you folks who live in the Rockies or the Sierras will do great if you put in some time hiking there before you go. On the other hand if you live near sea level you're going to have more trouble with the altitude. You'll have several days in Cusco at about 10,000 feet to help acclimatize but spending time hiking at altitude before the trip will really give you a big advantage.
Mike Chesnut Nov 07, 2014 at 04:55 AM

I strongly agree with Sheri Ann. We live 4 hours from the Great Smoky Mts and even hiking at 6000 ft a couple of weeks prior will help acclimate.. If I had any way, and could do the trip over, I would get to 6000 to 10000 feet a week or two prior and hike a couple days. Not Mandatory but I believe you would enjoy the trip more.


Laura Noyes Nov 06, 2014 at 04:38 PM

I read a blog that said Trekking Poles were provided to all participants is that true?
Joyce Minosh Nov 06, 2014 at 04:40 PM

Yes, Poles were provided. This trip was incredible, I've been home4 months and I still can't stop thinking about it. I want to do it again so that I can appreciate it more. Next time I will look up more and take time to enjoy the views.
Laura Hare Nov 06, 2014 at 04:40 PM

Yes, trekking poles are included for the program! If you decide to bring your own, please make sure that they have rubber tips.
Laura Hare Nov 06, 2014 at 04:40 PM

Laura Noyes Nov 06, 2014 at 04:45 PM

Any recommendations on boots. I'm thinking low cut but not sure if they are appropriate.
Bev Schrage Nov 06, 2014 at 05:11 PM

We went last month and I wore my trusty high top boots-- they did me quite well. Other folks were wearing mid top boots and seemed just fine. Pick a pair and train really extensively in them would be my recommendation.
Sheri Ann Cate Nov 06, 2014 at 11:29 PM

Unless you have trouble with your ankles you probably don't need high tops. The porters walked most of the way in flip flops. I wore lightwieght low top Keen hiking boots. I was glad not to have heavy boots to slow me down on those uphill stairs.
Helen Berkman Nov 07, 2014 at 01:19 AM

1. definitely you need hiking boots (NOT tennies or trainers) - and break them in as soon as possible. I had mine for about a year before the Peru trip. 2. yes, poles are essential but they give you very nice ones the first day you get to the Sacred Valley. 3. Try to bring an extra bottle on the plane so you don't have to buy the $8 bottle in the airport hotel the first night. After that bottled water is plentiful-handed out every day by your guides, and boiled by the porters on the trail. I brought iodine tablets but never used them.
Sharon Gray Nov 18, 2014 at 01:07 PM

If you use low cut boots and hike in them like I do, they are fine.


Laura Noyes Nov 06, 2014 at 04:29 PM

We're signed up to go in on the April 2015 trip. I need to get hiking shoes. Are low cut shoes OK or should I get boots. I'm reading we can't drink the water anywhere?
Joyce Minosh Nov 06, 2014 at 04:36 PM

I had hi tops, mid tops and low tops and looked at the for weeks before choosing the hi tops. They served me well and I never looked back.
Sheri Ann Cate Nov 06, 2014 at 05:40 PM

The water in the restaurants during the trip is O.K. The porters will boil your water on the trail. We brought a Steri-Pen which you can use to sterilize water anywhere.
Mike Chesnut Nov 06, 2014 at 06:30 PM

I would not hike the trail in low cut shoes unless you are an experienced hiker. From 35 years experience hiking, buy the best boots you can. I would not be concerned about the cost and get good help when purchasing boots. Break the boots in well and if have any concerns over a pinch or hot spot, get another pair. Blisters can ruin a hiking trip. I have seen this many times. You do not want your memories of one of the worlds great trails to be blisters and sore feet. I would not drink untreated water.
Jody Gebhardt Nov 06, 2014 at 10:52 PM

We got bottled water in most restaurants - our guides made sure we got safe water. And yes, on the trail, the porters boil all water used for drinking. It was a little hard remembering to use bottled water for toothbrushing, but we always had it available. Also, we brought our own water bottles for hiking, but really didn't use them. We kept using the liter drinking water bottles on the trail, refilling them when needed. They were lighter than our own water bottles.
Sharon Gray Nov 18, 2014 at 01:04 PM

I wore low cut boots because those are my hiking boots and I am most comfortable in them. They were fine.


Daniel Tam Nov 05, 2014 at 06:54 PM

I have a question regarding the food. Is it spicy hot with red chili peppers? Thank you for any comments.
Sheri Ann Cate Nov 05, 2014 at 07:09 PM

Daniel the food parepared on the trail is not spicy. I don't like hot spicy food either. The guide (if it's Paco) will bring some chilies and offer them to anyone who'd like to add them to their meal. There were lots of takers; but not me!
Daniel Tam Nov 05, 2014 at 07:14 PM

Thank you for your quick response. If the food on the trail is not spicy, what about food in general in Peruian restaurants and hotels?
Sheri Ann Cate Nov 05, 2014 at 07:25 PM

The restaurants and hotels on the tour had very good food that was mostly not too spicy; especially the Indio Feliz Restaurant in Aguas Calientes. The spice they use a lot in Peru is called Aji. You can always ask the server about how much spice is in the meal. Just don't order anything uncooked like salads or fruits. Bring an RX for Cipro to take just in case. I ate something in Lima right at the end of the trip that made me sick.
Daniel Tam Nov 05, 2014 at 07:58 PM

I can't take any chili spices at all so I think I may have a problem on my upcoming trip to Peru. Oh well, there is always rice and bread, I hope. Otherwise, I will be packing a lot of protein and fiber bars in my luggage.
Sheri Ann Cate Nov 05, 2014 at 08:22 PM

Those protein & fiber bars are very heavy. I took lots of them and brought most back home. They added a lot of weight to my duffel bag and luggage. I could've used that alloted weight for extra clothing, which I would've really appreciated for warmth and cleanliness.
Daniel Tam Nov 05, 2014 at 08:59 PM

Thank you for your sound advice!!
Jody Gebhardt Nov 05, 2014 at 10:35 PM

I agree with Sheri Ann. Let them know about your problems with chili spice. I found the food perfect in many ways, not too spicy, and I was rarely hungry without there being a meal imminent. They offer a lot of carbs, especially on the trail when you need them, not so much rice, but bread and potatoes. I don't think you'll need a lot of extra food. I never even used what I brought.
Daniel Tam Nov 05, 2014 at 11:35 PM

Thank you so much for everyone's help and advice. I appreciate it very much.
Mike Chesnut Nov 06, 2014 at 10:38 AM

we packed trail bars and peanut butter and did not eat any. the trail food was excellent and not spicy. We found the food overall excellent with plant of fresh fruit and variety. I do not remember anyone on our trip eating food they packed in. I did get a moderate illness the day we lef Lima for home.. I was probably careless with something. I did not treat my illness and in 1 week after arriving home, I was better.
Daniel Tam Nov 06, 2014 at 10:55 AM

Thanks you Mike!!


Ernie Hurwitz Sep 26, 2014 at 09:46 AM

actually, a book we liked better than Turn right is Cradle of Gold
Cradle of Gold: The Story of Hiram Bingham, a Real-Life Indiana Jones, and the Search for Machu Picchu Paperback – July 5, 2011

by


Actually we preferred Cradle of Gold by
Christopher Heaney to Turn Right at Macchu Pichu, altho we did read both.


Donna Opthoff Sep 25, 2014 at 03:11 PM

We are going on the June 2015 trek. One question that I have is about the length of time RS gives you at MP? Is a quick walk through in the evening and the next morning enough to see what you have hiked 4 days to see?
Madeleine Sep 25, 2014 at 03:40 PM

I took this trip in May 2014. From my perspective, we spent the right amount of time at Machu Picchu. We arrived around 3pm on the fourth day of hiking. It was partly cloudy, and a sunbeam broke through the clouds and lit up Machu Picchu. Gorgeous! We stayed at the Sun Gate for an hour or so enjoying the view and celebrating the accomplishment of our hike. To reach our bus, we walked down a trail that skirted the main site. The next morning, we got up early and arrived at MP before the crowds, spending the entire morning at the site. There was plenty of time to explore. Once the hordes of tourists began to arrive mid-day, I was happy to leave. MP is an awesome place, and the 4-day journey to get there made it even much more special.
Joyce Minosh Nov 06, 2014 at 04:38 PM

I feel that we all had as much time as we needed in MP.


Ernie Hurwitz Sep 25, 2014 at 01:50 PM

but was it fabulous?
Sheri Ann Cate Sep 25, 2014 at 03:44 PM

The 2nd and 4th days of the hike were the most exhilarating. The guides were superb. The program very educational.
Madeleine Sep 25, 2014 at 04:01 PM

I thoroughly enjoyed visiting Peru. It was my first time to South America, so it took me a little while to adjust to the differences, e.g., not being able to drink from the water faucets (even at nice hotels), the ramshackled look of many places, the high altitude, etc. But after a short time, I began to 'see' the country from a different viewpoint. The locals are lovely, gentle, hardworking people. The food is yummy. Road Scholar did an excellent job of organizing and delivering the program. (I did not enjoy Lima's traffic & congestion, but we didn't spend much time there.) When I think back to my favorite parts of the trip, the three acclimating hikes in Sacred Valley come to mind, but my top memory is of the 'journey' to Machu Picchu. Yes, MP is fantastic, but the challenging 4-day hike was FABULOUS! I wish I could hike the Inca Trail again . . .
Ernie Hurwitz Sep 25, 2014 at 04:24 PM

ah, that's what i want to hear! thanks
Jody Gebhardt Sep 25, 2014 at 08:24 PM

I agree. It was one of the hardest things I've done in awhile and one of the most exhilarating. You will have plenty of time to see macchu Pichu, and yes, once the crowds start to fill the place up, you will want to leave. I learned a lot about Peru, wish I read more before going, The second and fourth days are challenging, the latter because it is relentlessly down, and yes, you will be tired of down by the end. I loved the Sacred Valley and would gladly go back there to spend more time. I even thought the market at Pisac was better than much of what we saw in Cusco.
Madeleine Sep 26, 2014 at 07:31 AM

Amen, Jody! I recommend reading 'Turn Right at Machu Picchu' by Mark Adams. I read it once before I went to Peru and again after I returned. It's a great book! It's filled with so many details that it helps to refer to the glossary in the back regularly. Notice the book cover. When I first looked at it, it didn't have that much impact on me, but when I returned from Peru, I knew what each tiny detail meant. I agree about the market in Pisac.


Before we can post your comment, you must activate your profile on the Road Scholar Social Network. What's this?

By checking this box, you agree to the terms and conditions and your Road Scholar Social Network profile will be activated. You can continue posting your comment and fill out your profile later.
By checking this box, you will not be able to post your comment.



Before we can post your comment, you must be logged in to your Road Scholar Account
or


Log In via Facebook


Our Value Promise To You

You won't find a better value.

Included
at no additional cost on this date ...
11 nights of accommodations
31 meals: 11 breakfasts, 10 lunches, 10 dinners
5 Expert-led lectures
7 Field trips
1 Performances
2 Flights during the program

Ratings

5
Ratings are determined by participant evaluations.

Support Lifelong Learning

Our educational adventures are made possible by donors like you

Please support lifelong learning here

Free Catalog | Refer a Friend | Gift Certificates | Press | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Careers | Contact Us

© Elderhostel, Inc. 2014
11 Avenue de Lafayette | Boston MA 02111 | Toll-Free 1-800-454-5768